In The Drink

The Weakening of the Safe Water Drinking Act

Thursday, June 1, 1995

In The Drink

The Weakening of the Safe Water Drinking Act

In 1993-94 over 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) health or biological treatment standards or guidelines. In the Drink documents, on a community-by-community basis, drinking water utilities that have been listed as violating or exceeding these basic health and treatment safety standards.

  • Millions of individuals are made sick by unhealthy drinking water.
  • Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly threatened and contaminated with chemicals or microorganisms.
  • Current standards do not adequately protect large parts of the population -- particularly children or those suffering from illnesses.

In spite of the high health costs of unsafe drinking water, Congress, urged on by the nation's drinking water utilities, is poised to weaken the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Legislation pending in the House and Senate would weaken current law in a number of critical ways, including:

  • Weakening the Act's standard-setting provisions.
  • Curtailing water safety monitoring and reducing the public's right to know about drinking water problems.
  • Reducing protections for those who need it most - small and medium sized communities having the largest problems obtaining safe water.

The Health Effects of Common Drinking Water Contaminants

Total Coliform (Monthly): The presence of coliform bacteria in drinking water is generally a result of a problem with water treatment or the pipes which distribute the water, and possible contamination by disease-causing microorganisms (although the coliform themselves are not harmful). Disease symptoms may include diarrhea, cramps, nausea, and possibly jaundice, and any associated headaches and fatigue. EPA has set an MCL to reduce the risk of these adverse health effects. Under this standard, no more than 5 percent of the samples (assuming at least two samples test positive) collected during a month can contain these bacteria.

Total Coliform (Acute): Fecal coliforms or E. Coli, are a particular type of coliform bacteria. Their presence in drinking water is more serious than other coliform bacteria because they are disease-causing, and also indicate that drinking water has been contaminated by sewage or animal wastes that contain other disease causing microorganisms. This type of contamination can cause severe diarrhea, cramps, and nausea. Because fecal coliform contamination is more severe than contamination by other types of coliform bacteria, EPA sets an acute standard indicating that for water to be considered safe it must be free of all fecal coliform.

Treatment Technique Violations: If water is inadequately treated, microbiological contaminants in the water may cause diarrhea, cramps and nausea. Under the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR), EPA has set enforceable requirements for treating drinking water to reduce the risk from disease-causing microorganisms such as shigella, salmonella, cryptosporidium, and giardia. Under the SWTR, drinking water systems filtering their water must ensure that the process is working effectively as demonstrated by turbidity and objective disinfection criteria. Systems not filtering must ensure that their source waters are clean and adequately disinfected.

Turbidity: During the 1993 cryptosporidium outbreak in Milwaukee, an increase in turbidity was the only indication that there was a problem with drinking water quality. Highly turbid water indicated that disease risk from waterborne microorganisms is significantly increased. Turbidity is a measure of the clarity of a water sample and is used as an indicator for effectiveness of treatment processes to control pathogens in drinking water. In addition, high levels of turbidity may reduce the efficiency of disinfection and interfere with measurement of total coliforms.

Gross Alpha Radioactivity is a measure of radioactivity in water. Its presence indicates contamination by radium, radon, uranium, or other naturally occurring radioactive substances. These substances are known human carcinogens. EPA estimates that, over a lifetime, 15,750 people get cancer from drinking radioactive water (EPA 1991).

Radium-226 and -228 is another measure of radioactivity in water. Radium, a byproduct of the decay of uranium, is a naturally occurring, radioactive metal. It is a human carcinogen. Radium-226 is associated with bone sarcomas and head carcinomas, and Radium-228 is associated with bone sarcomas. EPA estimates that, over a lifetime, 15,750 people get cancer from exposure to radioactive drinking water (EPA 1991). Recommended treatment techniques include lime softening, cation exchange, and reverse osmosis.

Total Trihalomethanes: Trihalomethanes, (THMs) are disinfection byproducts, chemicals formed when chlorine used in drinking water disinfection reacts with naturally occurring organic material. More than ten human epidemiological studies have indicated that these chemicals are associated with rectal, bladder, or pancreatic cancers, and a 1993 article in the American Journal of Public Health estimated that annually, 10,700 rectal and bladder cancers may be caused each year by disinfection byproducts like the trihalomethanes (Morris, et al. 1992). A 1993 study by the U.S. Public Health Service suggested that disinfection byproducts are also associated with birth defects, including spine and neural disorders (Bove, et al. 1992). The current EPA standard allows a TTHM concentration of 0.10 mg/l, although in 1987 the National Academy of Sciences recommended that this standard be made more stringent (NRC 1987). Trihalomethane concentrations can be reduced by keeping source water clean, and by reducing or eliminating the "precursors" to these hazardous chemicals (organic material in the water that is necessary for their production) using treatment technologies such as Granular Activated Carbon.

Lead: According to the Department of Health and Human Services, lead is the number one environmental threat to children. For years, many water pipes contained lead, and this lead continues to leach into drinking water. Lead can cause a variety of adverse health effects in humans at low levels of exposure, and the EPA has concluded that there is in fact no "safe" exposure to lead. Exposure to lead in drinking water causes interference with red blood cell chemistry, delays in normal physical and mental development in babies and young children, deficits in the attention span, hearing, and learning abilities of children, and increases in the blood pressure of some adults. EPA has found that lead in drinking water causes over 560,000 children to exceed the CDC's blood-lead level of concern, and that better control of lead could help prevent over 680,000 cases of hypertension. Public water systems that have lead concentrations above 15 parts per billion in more than 10 percent of samples have exceeded EPA's Lead Action Level, and must optimize corrosion control and engage in a public education program to inform consumers of ways they can reduce their exposure to lead in drinking water (NRDC 1993).

Nitrate: Exposure to nitrate in drinking water above the current EPA standard of 10 ppm poses an acute risk to infants of methemoglobinemia, or blue baby syndrome, a condition caused by lack of oxygen. Symptoms of methemoglobinemia include shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and in more extreme cases loss of consciousness, and even death. In addition, nitrate reacts with other chemicals in the gut to form nitrosamines, potent carcinogenic compounds.

Atrazine is an herbicide used on corn and soybeans and commonly found in drinking water. It is a possible human carcinogen, and has been found to cause cancer of the mammary gland in animal studies. In addition, atrazine has also been found to disrupt the hormonal and endocrine system. Exposure to atrazine above the MCL is a serious concern because the standard is particularly weak, allowing cancer risks that exceed the "negligible" risk standard by a factor of 18. EPA has placed atrazine into Special Review, the first step in a possible ban, due to concerns over the public health impacts of exposure in food and water.

Trichloroethylene is a probable human carcinogen. This chemical is commonly used in metal cleaning or dry cleaning, and it usually contaminates drinking water wells due to improper disposal.

About the Report

All information presented in this report was based upon information contained in the EPA's Federal Reporting Data System (FRDS), a database maintained by EPA. The Environmental Working Group obtained the FRDS database, which contains over 300,000 records, via the Freedom of Information Act.

EPA maintains the FRDS database as a repository of compliance information on the Safe Drinking Water Act. States are responsible for entering all violation information into the database, and correcting any data errors.

The EPA FRDS data presented here significantly underestimate the number of systems out of compliance with the Act's health standards. First, many water utilities are not performing required testing, and thus are not detecting and reporting drinking water problems. In 1993-94, 52 million people, 20% of the nation's population, were served water by a utility that violated a SDWA monitoring requirement.

Second, many states are failing to report drinking water systems that are in violation of federal health standards. A 1990 GAO investigation found numerous instances where violations of the SDWA known to states were not reported as violations to EPA (GAO 1990). A 1988 investigation by EPA's Inspector General reported similar findings (EPA Inspector General 1988). And in 1992-93, 18 states reported no violations of chemical or radiological MCL standards (NRDC 1994). This is not because there is perfect compliance with standards in these states, but because these states are failing to report violations. The GAO concluded that, although there were a few instances of over reporting in EPA data, in the vast majority of cases many violations went unreported. Because of this rampant under reporting, the fact that a water system does not appear to have any reported violations should not necessarily be taken to mean that the system has not exceeded EPA health standards.

The following information from FRDS was used in this report.

  • Inventory information on each of the 185,000 drinking water systems in the United States, including names, locations, and population served.
  • Records of 235,000 violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act's Maximum Contaminant Level standards, violations of Surface Water Treatment Rule treatment technique requirements and SDWA monitoring, reporting, and notification requirements (which direct water systems to test the water for chemicals and microorganisms to ensure safety and inform the public of any problems).
  • Lead milestone data, containing 12,000 records of water system activity as part of EPA's Lead and Copper Rule. Included in this database is information pertaining to whether water systems have exceeded EPA's Lead Action Level, an indication of increased health risks from lead.

Alabama

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Alabama is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Clanton Water Department, Greenhill Water & Fire Protection Authority (Florence), and Sherbrooke Utilities (Toney) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Alabama, Clanton Water Department, Selma Water Works and Sewer Board, and Russellville Water Works had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform and Total Trihalomethanes. Alabama utilities such as Daphne Utilities Board and Fort Payne Water Works Board were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Clanton Water Department and the University Of Montevallo water systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Selma Water Worksand Sewer Board and Northeast Alabama Water System (Fort Payne) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Alaska

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Alaska is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Emmonak Water System, Port Graham, and the Selawik Safewater Facility were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Alaska, USAF Elmendorf Air Force Base had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies was Turbidity. Alaska utilities such as Kodiak City Water System and Arco Pb Operation Center (Anchorage) were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the USAF Elmendorf Air Force Base and USAF Eareckson AFS (Shemya Island) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Eielson Air Force Base and the City Of Sitka were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Arizona

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Arizona is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Mountain View Water Company (St. Johns), Doney Park Water (Flagstaff), and Winslow Municipal Water were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Arizona, Winslow Municipal Water, Metropolitan Water Company (Tucson), and Bella Vista Water Company (Sierra Vista) had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was ColiformGross Alpha Radiation. Residents served by the Tucson Water Department and Scottsdale Municipal Water drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Lake Havasu City and Tucson Metropolitan Water Company were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Arkansas

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Arkansas is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Norman Waterworks, Evening Shade Waterworks, and the Atkins Water System were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Arkansas, Hot Springs Waterworks, Paragould City Light & Water, and Jacksonville Water Department had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies was Coliform. Arkansas utilities such as the West Helena Water Works and Ozark Waterworks were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Saline Co. WW & SS Pfb (Alexander) and East Newton County Water Association drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the Hot Springs Waterworks and Jacksonville Water Department were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

California

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. California is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Cortland Pines Mutual Water Co. (Shingletown), Morris Brothers Dairy (Modesto), and Midway Trailer Park (Trinidad) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in California, Travis Air Force Base, Norco, and the City Of Cupertino system had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. California utilities such as Palo Alto and Presidio Of San Francisco were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Castaic Lake Water Agency and Davis water system drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Fresno and Modesto were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Colorado

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Colorado is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Lake Creek Meadows Water District (Vail), Teen Acres (Sterling), and Walsenburg were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Colorado, the City of Grand Junction water system, Ute WCD (Grand Junction), and Colorado Springs had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies was Coliform. Colorado utilities such as Estes Park and Idaho Springs were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Akron water system drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Colorado Springs and Ute WCD (Grand Junction) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Connecticut

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Connecticut is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Crystal Lake Associates (Madison), Danbury Water Department, and Platoz Apartments (Montville) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Connecticut, Danbury Water Department, Southington Water Department, and Torrington Water Company had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was ColiformTurbidity. Connecticut utilities such as Norwalk First Taxing District and Winsted Water Works were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Bethel Water Department and Indian Spring Water Company (Danbury) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Bridgeport Hydraulic Company and Danbury Water Department were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Delaware

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Delaware is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Pine Crest Terrace (Wilmington), Country Glen Homes (Bridgeville), and Bay City (Millsboro) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Delaware, Dover Water Department had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Nitrate and Coliform. Delaware utilities such as New Castle Water Department and Millsboro Water Department were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Bridgeville Water Company and McNicol Place Mobile Home Park (Rehoboth Beach) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Dover Water Department and Delaware State College were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Florida

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Florida is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Spencers Pinewood (Gibsonton), Useppa Island Club (Bokeelia), and Shady Acres Trailer Park (Fort Myers) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Florida, Plant City Utility, Ocpu/Northwestern Water System (Orlando), and North Port Utilities had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was ColiformGross Alpha Radiation. Florida utilities such as Port St. Lucie Utilities and Miramar were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the North Port Utilities and Lehigh Utilities Inc.(Lehigh Acres) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Manatee County Public Works and Tallahassee were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Georgia

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Georgia is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Fairway Villas (Acworth), Southwood Acres Mobile Home Park (Woodbine), and Green Acres Mobile Home Park (Sylvania) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Georgia, Tifton, Statesboro, and Smyrna had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was ColiformGross Alpha Radiation. Georgia utilities such as Cobb County (Marietta) and Marietta were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Winterset Shores Estates (Waycross) drank water that contained chemicalseoplepplies was Coliform or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Lagrange and Statesboro were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Hawaii

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Hawaii is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Lahaina Drinking Water System, Lower Kula Drinking Water System, and Upper Kula Drinking Water System were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Hawaii, Makawao Drinking Water System and USA Schofield (Oahu) had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies was Coliform. Water systems like USA Schofield (Oahu) and Makawao Drinking Water System were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Idaho

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Idaho is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Clarkia South, Paradise Valley Water Association (Bonners Ferry), and Sandpoint Water Dept were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Idaho, the City of Twin Falls, Nampa, and the Moscow Water Department had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Idaho utilities such as Nampa and McCall were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Chubbuck and Genesee water systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Twin Falls and Caldwell were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Illinois

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Illinois is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Coulterville, Pana, and Eureka were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Illinois, O Fallon, Interstate Water Company (Danville), and Collinsville had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was ColiformCombined Radium-226 and -228. Illinois utilities such as Chicago and Aurora were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Aurora and Decatur utilities drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Decatur and Waukegan were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Indiana

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Indiana is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Lakeside Manor Mobile Home Park (Shipshewana), Salem Water Works, and Mount Vernon Water Works were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Indiana, Fort Wayne, West Lafayette Water Company, and Purdue University Water Works had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Indiana utilities such as Hammond Water Works Department and Purdue University Water Works were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Fort Wayne and Marshall Water Works drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Fort Wayne and the West Lafayette Water Company were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Iowa

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Iowa is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Wahpeton Water Supply (Spirit Lake), Washburn Water System, and Prescott Water Supply were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Iowa, Keokuk Municipal Water Works, Iowa City Water Department, and Rathbun Regional Water Association (Centerville) had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Coliform and Nitrate. Iowa utilities such as Rathbun Regional Water Association and the Ankeny Water Works were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Dyersville Municipal Water Company and Guthrie Center Municipal Water Works drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the Iowa City Water Department and Keokuk Municipal Water Works were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Kansas

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Kansas is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Bronson, Uniontown, and Parsons were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Kansas, Parsons, Coffeyville, and Dodge City had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Kansas utilities such as Gardner and Norton were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the City Of Abilene and City Of Columbus drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Kansas City and Emporia were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Kentucky

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Kentucky is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Stamping Ground Water Works, Owenton City Water Works, and the Webster County Water District were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Kentucky, Mountain Water District (Pikeville), Paris Water Works, and the Williamsburg Water Plant had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Turbidity and Coliform. Kentucky utilities such as the Wheelwright Utility Commission were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Paris Water Works and Western Mason County Water District drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the Louisville Water Company and the Paducah Water Works were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Louisiana

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Louisiana is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Colonial Sugar Company (Gramercy), St. Maurice Water Supply (Natchitoches), and Ebarb Water System (West Monroe) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Louisiana, Thibodaux Waterworks, South Fort Polk Water System (Fort Polk), and Bogalusa had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Louisiana utilities such as West Monroe and the Grambling State University Water System were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Gilark Water System (Minden) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Shriever Water Treatment Plant Service Area (Houma) and Lafourche Water District #1 (Lockport) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Maine

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Maine is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Ashland Water & Sewer District, Stonington Water Company, and the Limestone Water District were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Maine, Kittery Water District and Kennebunk had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Maine utilities such as Kennebunk and Orono-Veazie Water District were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like the Kittery Water District and Bath Water District were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Maryland

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Maryland is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Midland-Lonaconing, Hebron Commissioners, and the Klondike Water Company were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Maryland, Havre De Grace Municpal Utility Commmission and Fort George Meade had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Nitrate and Coliform. Maryland utilities such as Department Of Army - Site R (Fort Ritchie) were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Crisfield and Mount Airy water systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Fort George Meade and Havre De Grace Municipal Utility Commmission were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Massachusetts

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Massachusetts is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that the Wakefield Water Department, Wayland Water Department, and Hudson Water Supply were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Massachusetts, the Wakefield Water Department, Wayland Water Department, and Hudson Water Supply had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Massachusetts utilities such as the Holbrook Public Works Department were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like MWRA (Boston) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Michigan

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Michigan is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Ann Arbor, Linwood Metropolitan District, and Dr. Roger Thomas Apartments (Fenton) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Michigan, Ann Arbor, Sault Ste Marie , and Marquette had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Michigan utilities such as Manistee and Grand Blanc Township were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Blissfield and Dundee water utilities drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Ann Arbor and Marquette were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Minnesota

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Minnesota is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Thief River Falls Municipal, Maple Lake Municipal, and Zumbro Falls MunicipalWater Supply were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Minnesota, New Hope, Hastings Municipal, and Fairmont Municipal had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Coliform and Nitrate. Minnesota utilities such as New Hope and Columbia Heights Municipal were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Hastings Municipal and Clear Lake Municipal water systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Thief River Falls Municipal and Osseo Munc Water Supply were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Mississippi

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Mississippi is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Turner Springs Water Association (Abbeville), Leesburg Water Association (Pelahatchie), and Homestead Water Association (McComb) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Mississippi, Plantersville, Natchez, and Greenville had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Mississippi utilities such as the Freeny Water Association (Carthage) and Houlka were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like Jackson and Greenville were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Missouri

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Missouri is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Bolivar, Laclede County PWSD #2 (Stoutland), and Rockville were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Missouri, Washington and Poplar Bluff had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Missouri utilities such as Lafayette County PWSD #2 (Higginsville) and Jefferson County PWSD# 8 (Cedar Hill) were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Higginsville and New Haven utilities drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Poplar Bluff were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Montana

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Montana is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Ashland Community (Lame Deer), Neihart, and Eastview HOA Missoula (Missoula) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Montana, Butte Silver Bow Water Department had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Montana utilities such as Laurel and Colstrip were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like Butte Silver Bow Water Department and Anaconda Water Department were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Nebraska

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Nebraska is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Crawford, Kearney, and McCook were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Nebraska, Kearney, Scottsbluff, and Norfolk had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Coliform and Nitrate. Nebraska utilities such as Minden, and Wymore were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the McCook and Broken Bow drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Kearney and Norfolk were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Nevada

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Nevada is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Las Vegas Mobile Home Park, Jarbidge Water Users, and Central Nevada Utilities (Pahrump) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Nevada, Sun Valley Water and Sanitation District (Sparks) and Westpac (Reno)had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Residents served by the 114th Street Mobile Home Park (Yerington) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Westpac (Reno) and Sun Valley Water And Sanitation Dist (Sparks) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

New Hampshire

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. New Hampshire is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Fairfield Homeowners Association (Sandown), Pawtuckaway Farms (Raymond), and Whip-O-Will Cooperative (Plymouth) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in New Hampshire, the Keene Water Department, Salem Water Department, and Dover Water Department had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. New Hampshire utilities such as Newport Water Works and Central Hooksett Water Prct. were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like the Dover Water Department and Keene were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

New Jersey

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. New Jersey is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Charles St Community Association (Stanhope), Boonton Water Department, and Belleville Water Department were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in New Jersey, Belleville Water Department, Elizabeth Water Department, and Jersey City had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. New Jersey utilities such as Camden City Water Department and Bloomfield Water Department were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Trenton Water Department and Brick Township MUA drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the Newark Water Department and Jersey City were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

New Mexico

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. New Mexico is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Ponderosa MDWCA, Miami Water Users Association, and Piney Woods Water Users Association (Cloudcroft) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in New Mexico, the Los Alamos Municipal Water System and Farmington Water System had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Residents served by the Glen Acres Subdivision (Lordsburg) and El Llano MDWCA (Fairview) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the Farmington Water System and Los Alamos Municipal Water System were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

New York

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. New York is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Cairo Water District, New York City Aqueduct System, and Delanson Village Water Works were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in New York, the New York City Aqueduct System, Utica Board Of Water Supply, and Jericho Water District (Syosset) had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. New York utilities such as Yonkers and Mount Vernon Water District #1 were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Garden City Village and Liberty Village utilities drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the New York City Aqueduct System and Yonkers were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

North Carolina

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. North Carolina is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Pheasant Creek (Cherokee), Mingus Creek (Cherokee), and Twin Lakes MHP (Rural Hall) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in North Carolina, Fort Bragg, Thomasville, and Charlotte had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. North Carolina utilities such as Fort Bragg and Hendersonville were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Fort Bragg and Thomasville water systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Charlotte and Asheville were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

North Dakota

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. North Dakota is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Neche, Colony Trailer Park (Minot), and Tuttle were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in North Dakota, Williston, Minot, and Fargo had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. North Dakota utilities such as Harvey and Ramsey Rural Water & Sewer (Devils Lake) were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Minot and Williston systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Fargo and Williston were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Ohio

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Ohio is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Wilmington, Willshire, and Wakeman were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Ohio, Wilmington, Fremont, and East Liverpool had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Ohio utilities such as East Cleveland and Painesville were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Alliance and Urbana Water Department drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Akron and the Columbus-Dublin Road Water Treatment Plant were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Oklahoma

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Oklahoma is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Stroud PWA, Fairfax, and Barnsdall were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Oklahoma, Okmulgee Public Water System, Claremore, and Stillwater had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Oklahoma utilities such as Hennessey and Roff were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Altus and Oklahoma University (Norman) systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the A.B. Jewell Water Treatment Plant (Tulsa) and OKC Hefner (Oklahoma City) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Oregon

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Oregon is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Riddle/Russell Creek, Seaside Water Department, and the Tillamook Water Commission were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Oregon, Lebanon, Woodburn, and Tigard had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Oregon utilities such as Tigard and Lake Oswego Municipal Water (West Linn) were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Canby Regency drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like the Oak Lodge Water District (Milwaukie) and Powell Valley Road Water District were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Pennsylvania

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Pennsylvania is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Whitehall Township Authority, Altoona City Authority, and LCA-WLSA-Washington Township (Slatedale) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Pennsylvania, Whitehall Township Authority, Altoona City Authority, and Watres Reservoir PG&W (Springbrook Township) had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Pennsylvania utilities such as Watres Reservoir PG&W (Springbrook Twp) and Hanover Municipal Water Works were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the North Penn. Water Authority (Lansdale) and Roaring Creek Water Company (Shamokin) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Pennsylvania-American Water Company-Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Water & Sewer Auth (Pittsburgh) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Rhode Island

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Rhode Island is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Zambarano Memorial Hospital (Pascoag), North Kingstown, and Hemlock Estates (Gloucester) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Rhode Island, North Kingstown, Woonsocket, and Bristol County Water Authority had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Rhode Island utilities such as Bristol County Water Authority (Warren) and Wakefield Water Company were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the United States Navy-Newport water system drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Woonsocket and Bristol County Water Authority (Warren) were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

South Carolina

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. South Carolina is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Lancaster County Water, Chester Metro (Ft Lawn), and Lancaster were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in South Carolina, Lancaster County Water, Chester Metro (Ft. Lawn), and Lancaster had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Total Trihalomethanes and Coliform (TCR). South Carolina utilities such as Charleston and Aiken were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Rock Hill and Lancaster County Water systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Greenville Water System and Rock Hill were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

South Dakota

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. South Dakota is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Isabel, Gracevale Colony (Winfred), and South Shore were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in South Dakota, Mitchell and Yankton had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Coliform (TCR) and Combined Radium (-226 & -228). South Dakota utilities such as Clay Rural Water System (Wakonda) and Redfield were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Mitchell and Garretson systems drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Mitchell and Yankton were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Tennessee

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Tennessee is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Red Boiling Springs Water System, Spring City Water System, and Sequatchie Water Works were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Tennessee, Sevierville Water Department, Elizabethton Water Department, and Alcoa Water System had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Tennessee utilities such as Hixson Utility District and Jonesboro Water Department were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like the Elizabethton Water Department and Springfield Water System were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Texas

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Texas is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Emory, East Tawakoni, and Chart House Condominium (Fort Worth) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Texas, San Benito, Greenville, and Forest Hill had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Texas utilities such as Port Neches and Terrell were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Burkburnett and Brady utilities drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Temple and Sherman were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Utah

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Utah is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Richfield City, Deweyville, and South Willard were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Utah, St. George and Payson had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Coliform. Utah utilities such as Dugway-English Village and Eden Waterworks System were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like St. George City and Payson were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Vermont

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Vermont is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Pownal Water Company, Shady Knoll Mobile Home Park (Guilford), and Grand Isle F.D.# 3 were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Vermont, Bennington Water Department, Stratton Mountain Water Company, and Barre City Water System had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Vermont utilities such as the Bennington Water Department and Springfield Water Department were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by water systems like the Rutland City Water Department and Barre City Water System were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Virginia

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Virginia is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Grayson Supply Company, Hollins Mobile Home Park (Roanoke), and Wayside Community Water System (Narrows) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Virginia, FCSA - James Diehl Water Treatment Plant (Stephens City), Loudoun County Sanitation Authority, and Fort Eustis had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Virginia utilities such as the Navy Public Works Center and Blacksburg-C'burg-VPI Water Authority were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Fork Union Sanitary District (Palmyra) and Hillwood Mobile Home Park (Gainesville) drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Richmond and the Arlington County Water and Sewer Division were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Washington

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Washington is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Firgrove Mutual Inc (Puyallup), Lewis County Water District #1 (Randle), and Curlew Water District were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Washington, Firgrove Mutual Inc (Puyallup), Lakewood Water District (Tacoma), and East Wenatchee Water District had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Washington utilities such as the Auburn Water Division and Westport Water Department were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Richland system and the Pasco Water Department drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Bremerton and Kennewick were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

West Virginia

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. West Virginia is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Mullens Water Works, Union Public Water Supply, and Parsons were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in West Virginia, Weirton Water Company, Buckhannon Water Board, and Beckley Water Company had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. West Virginia utilities such as Beckley Water Company and Charles Town Water Department were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the PSD-Hammond (Wellsburg) and Lakin State Hospital drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Weirton Water Company and Buckhannon Water Board were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Wisconsin

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Wisconsin is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Granton Waterworks, Bloomfield Manor (Dodgeville), and Hidden Acres Mobile Park #2 (Woodruff) were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Wisconsin, Whitewater Waterworks, Wisconsin Rapids Waterworks, and Watertown Waterworks had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminants of state water supplies were Coliform (TCR) and Combined Radium-226 and -228. Wisconsin utilities such as Watertown Waterworks and Beaver Dam Water Utility were affected by exceedances of the Lead Action Level, meaning that health threatening levels of lead were present in the water in many homes. Residents served by the Tomah Waterworks and Pewaukee Village Waterworks drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Wisconsin Rapids Waterworks and Whitewater Waterworks were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

Wyoming

In 1993 and 1994, more than 53 million Americans drank water that did not meet Safe Drinking Water Act standards. In The Drink is the first analysis of EPA's Safe Drinking Water Act compliance database to document these violations of tap water health standards on a community-by-community basis.

Widespread failure to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act is a symptom of increasing problems with drinking water quality in the United States. Drinking water plants are old and out of date, and water supplies are increasingly at risk from chemical and biological contamination. Wyoming is not immune from these problems; many cities and towns -- both large and small -- experienced violations or exceedances of EPA standards in the last year. These included violations of Maximum Contaminant Levels, (EPA's enforceable standards for chemical and biological contaminants), exceedances of the Lead Action Level, and violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (which requires water systems to adequately filter and disinfect water to prevent disease outbreaks).

The compliance data, which is supplied to EPA by state authorities, indicate that Lusk, Lance Creek Utilities, and Etna Pipeline Company were the three water systems with the most violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994. Among large water systems (those serving more than 10,000 people) in Wyoming, Sheridan and Laramie had the most reported violations or exceedances of drinking water standards in 1993 and 1994, according to EPA data.

The most common contaminant of state water supplies was Coliform. Residents served by the Superior water system drank water that contained chemicals or radioactivity above health-based standards, and water systems like Laramie and Sheridan were affected by violations of microbial contaminant standards such as Total Coliform.

As this report goes to press, Congress is poised to weaken the baseline public health protections provided by the Act. These changes would weaken standard-setting provisions, curtail water safety monitoring, diminish the public's right to know about drinking water problems, and reduce protections for small and medium sized communities. Ironically, much of this effort to roll back standards is being driven by a massive lobbying effort by the nation's water utilities. As In The Drink documents, it's time to strengthen, not weaken, the law that ensures that America's drinking water remains safe.

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