Samara Geller

Senior Research & Database Analyst

Samara Geller works on a variety of toxics and chemical transparency issues, including food packaging, antimicrobials and cleaning products. She focuses on developing and expanding EWG’s healthy cleaning consumer guides and programs, including EWG VERIFIED™ Cleaning Products, helping to raise consumer awareness and influence market change. Geller manages EWG’s Guide to Healthy Cleaning, which reviews and rates more than 3,100 household products based on ingredient hazards and disclosure. She also contributes to EWG’s California policy efforts.

In 2015, Geller helped introduce much-needed cleaners disclosure legislation in the state. Most recently, she was part of a team of nonprofit organizations and industry stakeholders that negotiated to help pass the Cleaning Product Right Know Act of 2018.

Videos

External Publications

In The News

To avoid ingesting or breathing dust as much as possible, wipe up dust frequently – don’t just save hard-to-reach spots for spring cleaning – and follow a ‘top-down’ strategy. Start with ceilings and high shelving, and work your way to the floors to limit redistribution of dust and other particles to freshly cleaned surfaces.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
Reader's Digest

Only disinfectants or sanitizers registered with the Environmental Protection Agency can legally make sanitizing or disinfecting claims. Those products will bear an EPA registration number on the label.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
Women's Health

Federal regulation of BPA is woefully inadequate, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration continues to support the use of BPA in most food packaging—ignoring a multitude of scientific studies, including those with evidence of low dose effects.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
Well + Good

Some bathroom cleaners may be more acidic (low pH) or basic (high pH) with higher concentrations of acids or alkalis compared to some all-purpose cleaners. These formulas can be irritating or corrosive to eyes, skin, and airways and can worsen asthma.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
MindBodyGreen

The biggest problem is that people have no reliable way of knowing whether they are buying food that is laced with this toxic chemical.“Federal regulations do not require manufacturers to label their products to identify cans with BPA-based linings.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
Organic Authority

Dryer balls help to lift and aerate the clothing and shorten dryer time. The less dryer time, the less static there will be. Stick a set of four to six balls in the dryer, and even your heaviest loads will dry quickly and evenly.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
Apartment Therapy

Even if the product appears safe – i.e. is marked ‘green’ or ‘fragrance-free’ – that doesn't necessarily mean it's free of dangerous chemicals. Labeling is a massive issue with cleaning products, and their ingredients are disclosed less often.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
House Beautiful

Start with ceilings and high shelving, and work your way to the floors to limit redistribution of dust and other particles to freshly cleaned surfaces.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
Taste of Home

As many people hunker down indoors to flatten the curve of the coronavirus epidemic, they may be using disinfectants and other cleaning products more frequently. It’s more important than ever that consumers use these chemicals safely, making sure to follow label directions exactly.

Person Mentioned
Samara Geller
New York Post