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Chromium-6

EWG found cancer-causing chromium-6 in tap water from 31 of 35 cities it tested. Americans deserve the protection of official safety standards to protect our water and health. Learn more.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

EWG's Nneka Leiba unpacks our recent report on chromium-6 in drinking water.

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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

In 2016, an EWG report found that chromium-6 – a cancer-causing compound made notorious by the film “Erin Brockovich” – contaminated the tap water supplies of 218 million Americans in all 50 states. But our just-released Tap Water Database shows the problem is even worse than that.

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News and Analysis
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Tuesday, September 20, 2016
In the film "Erin Brockovich," the environmental crusader confronts the lawyer of a power company that polluted the tap water of Hinkley, Calif., with a carcinogenic chemical called chromium-6. When the lawyer picks up a glass of water, Brockovich says: “We had that water brought in ‘specially for you folks. Came from a well in Hinkley.”
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Drinking water supplies for two-thirds of Americans are contaminated with the carcinogenic chemical made notorious by the film "Erin Brockovich," which was based on the real-life poisoning of tap water in a California desert town. But there are no national regulations for the compound – and the chemical industry is trying to keep it that way.

 

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News and Analysis
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Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Under an Environmental Protection Agency program, from 2013 to 2015, local water utilities took more than 60,000 water samples and found chromium-6 in more than 75 percent of samples. The EPA's tests were spurred by a 2010 EWG investigation that found elevated levels of chromium-6 in the tap water of 31 of 35 cities sampled. EWG's analysis of the EPA data estimates that water supplies serving 218 million Americans have potentially unsafe levels of the chemical.
 

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News Release
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

As news about North Carolina’s governor and his administration downplaying the risks of drinking water contaminated with hexavalent chromium unfolds, two leading environmental health advocates are pushing the Obama administration to finally set a nationwide standard for the highly toxic chemical.

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News Release
Tuesday, June 10, 2014

June 10, 2014

Re: IRIS Toxicological Review for Hexavalent Chromium; Cr(VI) Docket EPA-HQ-ORD-2014-0313

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, October 11, 2013

In 2013, California proposed a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L) for hexavalent chromium. EWG, in conjunction with the Natural Resources Defense Council, Clean Water Action and others, submitted comments to the California Department of Public Health strongly opposing the proposed standard and urging the Department to move to a health protective standard.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, October 11, 2013

The State of California’s proposed drinking water standard for hexavalent chromium, or chromium-6, could leave roughly 24 million residents, or more than 60 percent of the state’s population, unprotected from the known carcinogen, according to a review of the proposal by Environmental Working Group, Clean Water Action, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Center for Public Environmental Oversight and Integrated Resource Management.

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News Release
Friday, August 17, 2012

This week, EWG joined the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in filing a suit against California regulators for failing to develop a drinking water standard to protect millions of state residents against contamination by hexavalent chromium, or chromium-6.

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Tuesday, August 14, 2012

The Natural Resources Defense Council and the Environmental Working Group today sued the California Department of Public Health for failing to protect millions of Californians from hexavalent chromium, the cancer-causing chemical made infamous in the movie “Erin Brockovich” for contaminating drinking water and sickening residents in the town of Hinkley, California.

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News Release
Wednesday, January 4, 2012

In 2010, EWG identified chromium-VI contamination in the drinking water of 31 of the 35 cities we tested. One Kentucky city has stepped up to solve that problem.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, December 21, 2011

 

People are messy. So is nature. And what people do when nature unleashes its fury often makes things worse.

The staff at Environmental Working Group took a look at the major environmental news stories of the year and came up with two lists: the Top 10 Good News stories and the Top 10 Bad News stories.

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Article
Tuesday, September 20, 2011

 

EWG submits comments on EPA's IRIS program draft toxicological review of hexavalent chromium.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, August 8, 2011

Across the nation, water agencies have conducted hundreds of voluntary tests for this pollutant in response to EWG's startling discovery in 2010 that chromium-6 contamination is widespread in Americans' water supplies.

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Article
Wednesday, July 27, 2011

The California Environmental Protection Agency has set a public health goal of 0.02 parts per billion for drinking water contamination with the carcinogenic compound hexavalent chromium, or chromium-6.

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News Release
Friday, April 15, 2011

The Water Research Foundation, an offshoot of the American Water Works Association of water utilities, has accused Environmental Working Group of informing utility customers about the presence of chromium-6, a suspected carcinogen, in their tap water. "Reckless and irresponsible," the foundation claims.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Tap water industry representatives made no mention of their chromium-6 2004 study when they testified alongside EWG at a Feb. 2 Senate environment committee hearing on chromium-6 pollution.

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News and Analysis
Article
Sunday, April 3, 2011

EWG’s study of chromium-6 contamination in tap water is not the first to attempt to assess chromium-6 pollution across the country. 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, March 28, 2011

Some water utility representatives have protested Environmental Working Group’s report of laboratory tests that found worrisome levels of chromium-6, a suspected carcinogen, in the drinking water of 31 cities across the country. Yet the tap water industry was worried enough about the contaminant to conduct its own extensive survey in 2004 that found clear evidence of widespread chromium-6 pollution in untreated source water. The survey, conducted by the Awwa Research Foundation (since renamed the Water Research Foundation), an offshoot of the American Water Works Association, obtained data on 341 source water samples from 189 utilities in 41 states. The conclusion: chromium-6 is common in American groundwater.

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