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EWG's Tap Water Database

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Creighton Farms

 

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the Virginia Department of Health - Office of Drinking Water, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the EPA (July 2018 - September 2018), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

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3

contaminants detected above health guidelines

4

other detected contaminants

    Includes chemicals detected in 2015 for which annual utility averages exceeded an EWG-selected health guideline established by a federal or state public health authority; radiological contaminants detected between 2010 and 2015.

  • Arsenic

    cancer

    Arsenic is a potent carcinogen and common contaminant in drinking water. Arsenic causes thousands of cases of cancer each year in the U.S. Click here to read more about arsenic.

    STATE

    NATIONAL

    THIS UTILITY

    How your levels compare

    HEALTH GUIDELINE:
    0.004 ppb
    1.29 ppb
    0.182 ppb
    2.10 ppb
    The State and National averages were calculated using the averages of the contaminant measurements for each utility in 2015.
    ppb = parts per billion.

    Health risks of arsenic in excess of health guideline

    The health guideline of 0.004 ppb for arsenic was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

    Testing summary by quarter

    NOT TESTED

    NOT DETECTED

    DETECTED

    ABOVE HEALTH GUIDELINE

    ABOVE LEGAL LIMIT

    • Utility Average 2015: 2.10 ppb
    • Health Guideline Exceeded 2015: Yes
    • Legal Limit Exceeded 2015: No
    Utility
    Average
    2015
    Health
    Guideline
    Exceeded
    2015
    Legal
    Limit
    Exceeded
    2015
    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
    2.10 ppb Yes No

  • Nitrate and nitrite

    cancer

    Nitrate and nitrite enter water from fertilizer runoff, septic tanks and urban runoff. These contaminants can cause oxygen deprivation for infants and increase the risk of cancer. Nitrite is significantly more toxic than nitrate. Click here to read more about nitrate.

    STATE

    NATIONAL

    THIS UTILITY

    How your levels compare

    HEALTH GUIDELINE:
    5 ppm
    0.764 ppm
    0.629 ppm
    2.50 ppm
    The State and National averages were calculated using the averages of the contaminant measurements for each utility in 2015.
    ppm = parts per million.

    Health risks of nitrate and nitrite in excess of health guideline

    The health guideline of 5 ppm for nitrate and nitrite was defined by EWG based on studies by scientists at the National Cancer Institute and other independent researchers. This health guideline protects against cancer and harm to fetal growth and development.

    Testing summary by quarter

    NOT TESTED

    NOT DETECTED

    DETECTED

    ABOVE HEALTH GUIDELINE

    ABOVE LEGAL LIMIT

    • Utility Average 2015: 2.50 ppm
    • Health Guideline Exceeded 2015: Yes
    • Legal Limit Exceeded 2015: No
    Utility
    Average
    2015
    Health
    Guideline
    Exceeded
    2015
    Legal
    Limit
    Exceeded
    2015
    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
    2.50 ppm Yes No

  • Radiological contaminants

    cancer

    This utility detected Radium, combined (-226 & -228) & Radium-226.

    Radiological contaminants leach into water from certain minerals and from mining. Drinking water contamination with radioactive substances increases the risk of cancer and may harm fetal development.

    Includes chemicals detected in 2015 for which annual utility averages were lower than an EWG-selected health guideline established by a federal or state public health authori.

  • Barium


    Barium is a mineral present in rocks, soil and water. High concentrations of barium in drinking water increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension.

    STATE

    NATIONAL

    THIS UTILITY

    How your levels compare

    HEALTH GUIDELINE:
    700 ppb
    68.0 ppb
    35.3 ppb
    160.0 ppb
    The State and National averages were calculated using the averages of the contaminant measurements for each utility in 2015.
    ppb = parts per billion.

    Health risks of barium in excess of health guideline

    The health guideline of 700 ppb for barium was defined by the Environmental Protection Agency as a children's health-based limit for 10-day exposure, a non-enforceable federal health advisory. This health guideline protects against harm to internal organs.

    Testing summary by quarter

    NOT TESTED

    NOT DETECTED

    DETECTED

    ABOVE HEALTH GUIDELINE

    ABOVE LEGAL LIMIT

    • Utility Average 2015: 160.0 ppb
    • Health Guideline Exceeded 2015: No
    • Legal Limit Exceeded 2015: No
    Utility
    Average
    2015
    Health
    Guideline
    Exceeded
    2015
    Legal
    Limit
    Exceeded
    2015
    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
    160.0 ppb No No

  • Dichloromethane (methylene chloride)


    Methylene chloride is a common industrial solvent used for paint stripping, vapor degreasing, printing, electronics manufacturing and cleaning. It causes cancer and liver damage in animal studies.

    STATE

    NATIONAL

    THIS UTILITY

    How your levels compare

    HEALTH GUIDELINE:
    4 ppb
    0.00303 ppb
    0.00119 ppb
    0.590 ppb
    The State and National averages were calculated using the averages of the contaminant measurements for each utility in 2015.
    ppb = parts per billion.

    Health risks of dichloromethane (methylene chloride) in excess of health guideline

    The health guideline of 4 ppb for dichloromethane (methylene chloride) was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against cancer.

    Testing summary by quarter

    NOT TESTED

    NOT DETECTED

    DETECTED

    ABOVE HEALTH GUIDELINE

    ABOVE LEGAL LIMIT

    • Utility Average 2015: 0.590 ppb
    • Health Guideline Exceeded 2015: No
    • Legal Limit Exceeded 2015: No
    Utility
    Average
    2015
    Health
    Guideline
    Exceeded
    2015
    Legal
    Limit
    Exceeded
    2015
    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
    0.590 ppb No No

  • Fluoride


    Fluoride occurs naturally in surface and groundwater and is also added to drinking water by many water systems.

    STATE

    NATIONAL

    THIS UTILITY

    How your levels compare

    0.437 ppm
    0.692 ppm
    0.150 ppm
    The State and National averages were calculated using the averages of the contaminant measurements for each utility in 2015.
    ppm = parts per million.

    Testing summary by quarter

    NOT TESTED

    NOT DETECTED

    DETECTED

    ABOVE LEGAL LIMIT

    • Utility Average 2015: 0.150 ppm
    • Health Guideline Exceeded 2015: No
    • Legal Limit Exceeded 2015: No
    Utility
    Average
    2015
    Health
    Guideline
    Exceeded
    2015
    Legal
    Limit
    Exceeded
    2015
    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
    0.150 ppm No No

  • Xylenes (total)


    Xylenes are solvents used in industrial and consumer products, such as cleaning agents and paint thinners. Xylenes cause nervous system damage and may harm developing fetuses.

    STATE

    NATIONAL

    THIS UTILITY

    How your levels compare

    HEALTH GUIDELINE:
    1,800 ppb
    0.137 ppb
    0.339 ppb
    0.580 ppb
    The State and National averages were calculated using the averages of the contaminant measurements for each utility in 2015.
    ppb = parts per billion.

    Health risks of xylenes in excess of health guideline

    The health guideline of 1,800 ppb for xylenes was defined by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment as a public health goal, the level of a drinking water contaminant that does not pose a significant health risk. This health guideline protects against harm to the brain and nervous system.

    Testing summary by quarter

    NOT TESTED

    NOT DETECTED

    DETECTED

    ABOVE HEALTH GUIDELINE

    ABOVE LEGAL LIMIT

    • Utility Average 2015: 0.580 ppb
    • Health Guideline Exceeded 2015: No
    • Legal Limit Exceeded 2015: No
    Utility
    Average
    2015
    Health
    Guideline
    Exceeded
    2015
    Legal
    Limit
    Exceeded
    2015
    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
    0.580 ppb No No

Want to filter these contaminants out?

Pollution sources

Click on each pollution source to see from which source contaminants come.

agriculture icon

Agriculture

teardrop 2
industry icon

Industry

teardrop 6
water treatment icon

Treatment
byproducts

tear drop 1
urban area icon

Runoff &
sprawl

teardrop 3
naturally occuring icon

Naturally
occuring

teardrop 5

  • Arsenic
  • Nitrate and nitrite
  • Arsenic
  • Barium
  • Xylenes (total)
  • Dichloromethane (methylene chloride)
  • Radium, combined (-226 & -228)
  • Radium-226
  • Arsenic
  • Barium
  • Nitrate and nitrite
  • Radium, combined (-226 & -228)
  • Radium-226
  • Nitrate and nitrite
  • Xylenes (total)
  • Dichloromethane (methylene chloride)
  • Fluoride
Specific water contaminants can come from more than one source.

Creighton Farms compliance with legally mandated federal standards

  • From October 2015 to September 2018, Creighton Farms complied with health-based drinking water standards.
Information in this section on Creighton Farms comes from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History Online database. Click here for more information for this utility.

Other contaminants tested


Contaminants detected between 2010 and 2014 and were not part of EPA's UCMR-3 testing program:

Manganese, Nitrate, 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene, Monochloroacetic acid, Dichloroacetic acid, Trichloroacetic acid, Dibromoacetic acid, Haloacetic acids (HAA5), Chloroform, Bromoform, Bromodichloromethane, Dibromochloromethane, Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs), Ethylbenzene, o-Xylene, n-Propylbenzene, m- & p-Xylene

 

Chemicals tested for but not detected from 2010 to 2015:

1,1,1-Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-Trichloroethane, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene, 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,2-Dichloropropane, 2,4,5-T, 2,4,5-TP (Silvex), 2,4-D, 2,4-DB, 2,4-Dinitrotoluene, 3,4-Dichlorobenzoic acid, 3-Hydroxycarbofuran, Acenaphthylene, Alachlor (Lasso), Aldicarb, Aldicarb sulfone, Aldicarb sulfoxide, Aldrin, alpha-Chlordane, Aluminum, Anthracene, Antimony, Atrazine, Baygon (Propoxur), Bentazon (Basagran), Benzene, Benzo[a]anthracene, Benzo[a]pyrene, Benzo[b]fluoranthene, Benzo[g,h,i]perylene, Benzo[k]fluoranthene, Beryllium, Bromacil, Butachlor, Butyl benzyl phthalate, Cadmium, Carbaryl, Carbofuran, Carbon tetrachloride, Chlordane, Chromium (total), Chrysene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Cyanide, Dalapon, DCPA mono- and di-acid degradates, Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, Di-n-butyl phthalate, Diazinon (Spectracide), Dibenz[a,h]anthracene, Dicamba, Dichlorprop, Dieldrin, Diethyl phthalate, Dimethoate, Dimethyl phthalate, Dinoseb, Diquat, Endrin, Ethylene dibromide, Fluoranthene, Fluorene, gamma-Chlordane, Heptachlor, Heptachlor epoxide, Hexachlorobenzene (HCB), Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, Isophorone, Lindane, Mercury (inorganic), Methiocarb, Methomyl, Methoxychlor, Metolachlor, Metribuzin, Molinate, Monobromoacetic acid, Monochlorobenzene (chlorobenzene), MTBE, Nitrite, o-Dichlorobenzene, Oxamyl (Vydate), p-Dichlorobenzene, Paraquat, Pentachlorophenol, Phenanthrene, Picloram, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Propachlor, Pyrene, Radium-228, Selenium, Silver, Simazine, Styrene, Tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene), Thallium, Thiobencarb, Toluene, Toxaphene, trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene, trans-Nonachlor, Trichloroethylene, Trifluralin, Vinyl chloride