Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.

Toxicologist

As part of the Healthy Living Science team, Thomas Galligan reviews the safety of products and ingredients, from personal care products to cleaners, and contributes to the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™. He joined EWG after completing a postdoctoral position at his alma mater, Virginia Tech, where he investigated links between ecosystem degradation and reproductive health in the hellbender salamander.

External Publications

In The News

We urge consumers who are concerned about their pesticide intake to consider, when possible, purchasing organically grown versions of the foods on EWG’s Dirty Dozen, or conventional produce from our Clean Fifteen.

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Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
Today

We urge consumers who are concerned about their pesticide intake to consider, when possible, purchasing organically grown versions of the foods on EWG's Dirty Dozen, or conventional produce from our Clean 15.

Person Mentioned
Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
UPI

The most important thing is that everyone should be eating lots of fruits and vegetables. We do recommend you try to reduce your pesticide exposure. Choose organic whenever possible.

Person Mentioned
Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
USA Today

If you’re eating the peel, the group’s general advice holds: Choose organic produce when possible — especially for the Dirty Dozen. This is especially important for anything you’re eating raw.

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Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
The Washington Post

If we included raisins in our calculations, they would be number one on the Dirty Dozen.

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Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
Good Housekeeping

Each year the United States Department of Agriculture picks a subset of produce and food commodities and test them themselves in their own labs. For fresh fruits and vegetables, they peel them just like a consumer would do at home. The testing is meant to reflect what someone would experience eating at their own house.

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Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
Well + Good

It is also important to reduce your exposure to pesticides because pesticides have been linked to a variety of health harms, like cancer, hormone disruption, and damaging children's developing brains. Switching to organic produce is an effective way to reduce your pesticide exposure.

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Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
Eat This, Not That!

The most important thing is that everyone should be eating lots of fruits and vegetables. We do recommend you try to reduce your pesticide exposure. Choose organic whenever possible.

Person Mentioned
Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
The Independent

Whether organic or conventionally grown, fruits and vegetables are critical components of a healthy diet. We urge consumers who are concerned about their pesticide intake to consider, when possible, purchasing organically grown versions of the foods on EWG’s Dirty Dozen, or conventional produce from our Clean Fifteen.

Person Mentioned
Thomas Galligan, Ph.D.
One Green Planet