Sarah Porter

Senior GIS Analyst

Sarah Porter investigates and maps the effects of industrial agriculture on the environment and communities. She joined EWG in 2018 after six years with the USDA performing agricultural research and developing precision conservation planning tools. At the University of Iowa, Porter’s studies focused on the effects of modern agriculture on the environment and human health.

External Publications

In The News

Some people benefit economically, others suffer the side effects.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
The Guardian

There was a significant data gap in understanding how much of a contributor animal operations are to the issues we’re seeing in Lake Erie. And without knowledge of where these operations are, how many animals are there, how much manure and phosphorous they are generating – there’s not going to be much progress made.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
Columbus Dispatch

We should be moving faster to prevent it from entering crisis mode.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
Minneapolis Star-Tribune

The fact is, without state-issued permits, nobody knows anything about these facilities.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
Michigan Advance

We saw the highest amount of regulation in Indiana. So officials there have more knowledge and more requirements on the manure management plans in that state.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
Great Lakes Now

The steady growth of factory farms in the area might help explain why the Lake Erie toxic algae bloom is still such a huge problem, despite the hundreds of millions of dollars the state has spent trying to clean it up.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
Toledo Blade

Many years of unaddressed nitrates from farm pollution have brought Minnesota to the brink of a public health crisis. Now Minnesotans are paying for the state’s failure to hold farmers accountable for not keeping fertilizer and manure out of the water supply.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
Rochester Post Bulletin

It’s important to understand where that phosphorous is coming from, whether commercial fertilizer or manure, so you can better develop management plans to address the problem specific to that source.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
ideastream

In certain areas of the state this is really becoming a problem. In some townships where they test, 30% or 40% of the wells are testing above the legal limit.

Person Mentioned
Sarah Porter
Mankato Free Press