PFAS Chemicals

‘Forever Chemicals’: Teflon, Scotchgard and the PFAS Contamination Crisis

In 1946, DuPont introduced Teflon to the world, changing millions of people’s lives – and polluting their bodies. Today, the family of compounds including Teflon, commonly called PFAS, is found not only in pots and pans but also in the blood of people around the world, including 99 percent of Americans. PFAS chemicals pollute water, do not break down, and remain in the environment and people for decades. Some scientists call them “forever chemicals."

Since 2001, when news erupted about the contamination of drinking water near a Teflon plant in West Virginia, EWG has been in the forefront of research and advocacy on PFAS chemicals. Links to much of our work follow. For a compelling overview of the contamination in West Virginia and its aftermath, see the acclaimed documentary film The Devil We Know, available on multiple streaming platforms.

A robust body of research reveals a chemical crisis of epic proportions. Nearly all Americans are affected by exposure to PFAS chemicals in drinking water, food and consumer products.

What are PFAS chemicals?

Per- or polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS chemicals, are a family of thousands of chemicals used to make water-, grease- and stain-repellent coatings for a vast array of consumer goods and industrial applications. These chemicals are notoriously persistent in the environment and the human body, and some have been linked to serious health hazards.

What are the health effects of PFAS?

The two most notorious PFAS chemicals – PFOA, formerly used by DuPont to make Teflon, and PFOS, an ingredient in 3M’s Scotchgard – were phased out under pressure from the Environmental Protection Agency after scientific evidence of serious health problems came to light. The manufacture, use and importation of both PFOA and PFOS are now effectively banned in the U.S., but evidence suggests the next-generation PFAS chemicals that have replaced them may be just as toxic. PFAS chemicals pollute water, do not break down and remain in the environment and in people for decades.

Studies have linked PFAS chemicals to:

  • Testicular, kidney, liver and pancreatic cancer.
  • Weakened childhood immunity.
  • Low birth weight.
  • Endocrine disruption.
  • Increased cholesterol.
  • Weight gain in children and dieting adults.

Monday, February 4, 2019

A former chemical and fossil fuel industry executive who recently oversaw the anti-environmental agenda of the Koch brothers is now in charge of the Trump administration’s plan to address the crisis of PFAS contamination in the nation’s drinking water supply, according to a report today by Politico.

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News Release
Monday, January 28, 2019

The Trump administration will not set legal limits for two toxic chemicals that may contaminate more than 110 million Americans’ drinking water, two sources familiar with the upcoming decision told Politico.

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News Release
Wednesday, January 23, 2019

EWG today applauded Reps. Dan Kildee (D-Mich.) and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-Pa.) for establishing a new bipartisan task force in the House of Representatives to address the urgent drinking water contamination crisis caused by the toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS. 

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News Release
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Reps. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), Fred Upton (R-Mich.) and Dan Kildee (D-Mich.) introduced legislation Monday to classify the fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS as hazardous substances under the Superfund toxics law, which would be an important step toward cleaning up the widespread contamination by these compounds across the nation.

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News Release
Wednesday, January 9, 2019

In its guidelines for addressing cleanup of groundwater and military and industrial sites contaminated with toxic fluorinated chemicals, the Environmental Protection Agency is recommending a limit 10 times higher than what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention believe is safe for human health.

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News Release
Thursday, December 6, 2018

A new study from the Danish Environmental Protection Agency found toxic fluorinated, or PFAS, chemicals at high levels in nearly one-third of the cosmetics products it tested.

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News Release
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

GenX, introduced a decade ago as a “safer” alternative for the notorious non-stick chemicals PFOA and PFOS, is nearly as toxic to people as what it replaced, says an Environmental Protection Agency study released today. 

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News Release
Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Congress passed legislation Wednesday that will give commercial airports the option to switch to firefighting foams that do not include the highly toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS.

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News Release
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

The family of fluorinated compounds known as PFAS chemicals includes more than 4,700 chemicals – some linked to cancer, thyroid disease, weakened immunity and developmental defects, and others whose health effects are unknown. One thing’s for sure: You don’t want them in your body.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, August 23, 2018

The contamination of drinking water and groundwater by toxic fluorinated compounds, known as PFAS chemicals, is a national crisis demanding a national response.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Attached are EWG’s comments to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, or ATSDR, on its draft toxicological profile on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, often referred to as PFAS.

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Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, July 30, 2018

The known extent of contamination of American communities with toxic fluorinated compounds, known as PFAS chemicals, continues to grow at an alarming rate.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, June 20, 2018

A government report released today – which was suppressed by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense and the White House for fear it would cause a “public relations nightmare” – recommends a much lower safe level for toxic fluorinated, or PFAS, chemicals than the EPA’s non-enforceable health advisory level.

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News Release
Thursday, June 7, 2018

Attached is a letter submitted by more than 50 public interest organizations calling on the Department of Health and Human Services to release a recent toxicological profile by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry that assesses the

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, June 7, 2018

A wide-ranging coalition of public interest groups is calling for the immediate release of a suppressed federal study that says perfluorinated chemicals in drinking water are hazardous at much lower levels than the Environmental Protection Agency’s guidelines state.

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News Release
Monday, June 4, 2018

Mixtures of chemicals commonly found in consumer products are more likely to increase breast cancer risk than the same chemicals individually, according to a new analysis. But safety tests by government regulators don’t routinely evaluate the combined effects of multiple chemical exposures.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, May 22, 2018

At a so-called leadership summit today, Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt said drinking water contaminated with toxic fluorinated chemicals is a “national priority.” But a new EWG report reveals that the EPA hasn’t even told Americans the true extent of the pollution, which is much worse than previously reported.

Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore via Flickr.com

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News Release
Monday, May 14, 2018

The federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is preparing to propose safe levels for fluorinated chemicals in drinking water nearly six times more stringent than the Environmental Protection Agency’s recommendation.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, May 7, 2018

The Defense Department has for the first time disclosed the locations of military installations where tap water or groundwater on or off base is contaminated with highly toxic fluorinated chemicals.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, April 18, 2018

The latest update of an interactive map by EWG and the Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute at Northeastern University documents publicly known PFAS pollution from 94 sites in 22 states, including industrial plants and dumps, military air bases, civilian airports and fire training sites. It also shows PFAS pollution of tap water for 16 million people in 33 states and Puerto Rico.  

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Reports & Consumer Guides

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