Glyphosate

Glyphosate: The Cancer-Causing Roundup Chemical Found in Children’s Cereal

Glyphosate is a toxic pesticide widely used on crops. The active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup, it is sprayed on oats right before harvest to dry them out, so it ends up in many oat-based products, like cereals and breakfast bars.

Since there is no federal monitoring of glyphosate in oats, we wanted to know how much Roundup could be found in oat-based breakfast foods popular with children. So we commissioned independent labs to conduct three separate rounds of tests.

After an initial set of tests revealed troubling amounts of glyphosate in popular oat-based products marketed to children, we twice expanded our test to include even more products. Once again, almost all of the products had levels of glyphosate above 160 parts per billion, which is our health benchmark for glyphosate in oats.

We know it is possible to grow oats and other grains without spraying weedkiller right before the grain is harvested, which is what leads to these high levels of glyphosate. 

We will continue to put pressure on companies to work with suppliers to source oats that aren’t produced with glyphosate. Harmful pesticides don’t belong in kids’ breakfast foods.

 

EWG’s Tests of Glyphosate in Cereal

Glyphosate in the News

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Farmers in Arkansas and Missouri have filed more than 100 complaints with state agriculture agencies over a toxic weed killer that is drifting from adjacent farms and damaging their crops. The herbicide is not only stunting the growth of soybeans – it's also being used illegally.

 

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AgMag
Article
Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Monsanto marketed its potent weed killer glyphosate – brand name Roundup -- and the corn and soybeans genetically engineered to withstand it by claiming that it would replace other, more toxic weed killers such as atrazine on American farmland

 

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AgMag
Article
Friday, June 3, 2016

The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday (June 2) released a draft risk assessment confirming what some scientists have been warning for years: the weedkiller atrazine likely poses a risk to many animals including fish, amphibians, mammals, and birds. If finalized, the finding could lead to severe restrictions on the second-most widely used herbicide in the U.S.

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AgMag
Article
Tuesday, May 10, 2016

When the Environmental Protection Agency recently released and then abruptly withdrew a draft document on the cancer risks posed by the pesticide glyphosate, Monsanto jumped at the chance to say that its signature chemical had been exonerated.

 

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AgMag
Article
Friday, April 8, 2016

Remember when we warned you that Americans are at greater risk of being exposed to Monsanto’s glyphosate herbicide than Europeans? Well, that might become even truer if the French government follows through with a new plan to ban some glyphosate weed killers.

 

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AgMag
Article
Monday, March 28, 2016

Genetically modified corn and soybeans were supposed to reduce chemical use on farms, but instead they’ve done the exact opposite by creating herbicide-resistant "superweeds" and increasing the use of Monsanto’s toxic weed killer Roundup. Now the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's internal watchdog wants to know how this chemical war on weeds is affecting human health and the environment.

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AgMag
Article
Friday, March 25, 2016

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said this week (March 23) it will allow farmers to plant a new strain of genetically modified (GMO) corn created by Monsanto to be tolerant of the week killers dicamba and glufosinate without government oversight, a step likely to expand the use of these chemical herbicides.

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AgMag
Article
Wednesday, March 23, 2016

A new study (March 21) concludes that monarch butterflies may go extinct within two decades, largely as the result of widespread adoption of herbicides used with genetically modified corn and soybeans in the United States.

 

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AgMag
Article
Wednesday, March 9, 2016

In a recent interview for New York magazine’s Grub Street, author and food activist Michael Pollan laid out why he believes that food containing genetically modified ingredients (GMOs) should be labeled – and why GMO crops have been bad for the environment.
 

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AgMag
Article
Monday, February 22, 2016

This week, the Senate Committee on Agriculture will consider a new version of the DARK Act. The House of Representatives has already passed legislation blocking your right to know what’s in your food. Here are the top 10 reasons to oppose the Senate version of the DARK Act.

 

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AgMag
Article
Friday, February 19, 2016

Some members of the Senate are trying to lure their colleagues to the dark side by cosponsoring a version of what critics call the DARK – Deny Americans the Right to Know – Act.

 

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AgMag
Article
Thursday, February 18, 2016

The Food and Drug Administration plans to start testing food for traces of glyphosate, the world’s most commonly used pesticide. I know what you’re thinking: the federal government wasn’t doing that already?!

 

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AgMag
Article
Thursday, February 18, 2016

The Environmental Protection Agency is falling short in its duty to protect Americans from the dangers of glyphosate, the most widely used weed killer in agriculture, according to a scientific review published online yesterday (Feb. 17) in the journal Environmental Health. The agency’s estimates of safe levels of exposure are based on outdated science, and its scientists are not sufficiently monitoring how much glyphosate is getting into food and people.
 

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AgMag
Article
Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Americans are more likely than Europeans to be exposed to Monsanto’s glyphosate weed killer. That’s in large part because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s calculations to determine allowable levels of glyphosate use are much more lax than the European Union’s.

 

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AgMag
Article
Tuesday, February 2, 2016

More than 3.5 billion pounds of glyphosate herbicide have been sprayed in the U.S. since it first hit the market as Monsanto’s “Roundup” in 1974, according to a paper published today by agricultural economist Charles Benbrook in the open-access journal Environmental Sciences Europe.

 

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AgMag
Article
Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Monsanto’s signature herbicide glyphosate, first marketed as “Roundup,” is now the most widely and heavily applied weed-killer in the history of chemical agriculture in both the U.S. and globally, according to a landmark report published today

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News Release
Monday, January 11, 2016

As in past years, EWG asked its staff of scientists, policy analysts and governmental and communications specialists to vote on what they considered the 10 most important stories of 2015 in two categories: stories that relate specifically to agriculture and those that involve general environmental issues. The rest of the agriculture list is below. To see the staff’s ranking of general environmental stories, got to EWG’s Enviroblog.

 

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AgMag
Article
Wednesday, November 25, 2015

In a stunning reversal, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has retreated from its earlier decision to let Dow AgroSciences market a new weed killer, branded Enlist Duo, which the company designed to kill hardy weeds on fields of genetically engineered corn and soybeans.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, November 23, 2015

Some lawmakers are trying to slip the darkest part of the DARK Act onto the must-pass spending bill Congress will consider.

 

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, November 9, 2015

The most egregious flaw of the United States’ toothless and outdated system of regulating chemicals is the failure to adequately and independently test chemicals for safety. Because of the Environmental Protection Agency’s woeful shortage of resources, manufacturers submit their own data to vouch for new chemicals, and most studies of existing chemicals are conducted by for-profit consultants selected and paid by the very companies whose products they’re evaluating.

 

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News and Analysis
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