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BPA

EWG has pushed to ban BPA ever since it showed that the chemical leaches from can linings into foods, beverages and infant formula – and ends up in the bodies of 93 percent of Americans.

Friday, September 14, 2018

A groundbreaking new study, the first to test what happens in people immediately after they are exposed to bisphenol A, or BPA, shows that levels at which the federal government states is “safe” and should have no effect, in fact can alter insulin response, a key marker for metabolic diseases like diabetes.

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Monday, June 4, 2018

Mixtures of chemicals commonly found in consumer products are more likely to increase breast cancer risk than the same chemicals individually, according to a new analysis. But safety tests by government regulators don’t routinely evaluate the combined effects of multiple chemical exposures.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, April 26, 2018

New federally funded research links low doses of bisphenol A with a sharp increase in breast tumors in laboratory animals.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, February 9, 2018

No one disputes that bisphenol A, a toxic compound widely used to line food cans and other food packaging, is polluting people. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found BPA in the urine of more than 90 percent of Americans sampled. In 2009, tests commissioned by EWG were the first to find BPA in the umbilical cords of nine of 10 infants sampled.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, November 30, 2017

It’s not just a poor diet and lack of exercise that can make kids overweight.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Replacements for bisphenol A, a hormone-disrupting chemical in plastics and food containers, could be just as harmful or even worse than it, according to a new study by the National Toxicology Program.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, April 10, 2017

If you have small children in the house, are pregnant or are trying to conceive – or simply want to stay healthy – you are probably looking for ways to avoid toxic chemicals at home and outdoors. Harmful pollutants that can increase the risk of cancer and damage your developing child’s IQ can lurk in household dust, leach out of plastic containers and even contaminate tap water.

 

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Children's Health
Article
Wednesday, July 20, 2016

The nation’s new chemical safety law promises to give the Environmental Protection Agency expanded authority to regulate hazardous chemicals in consumer products. But of the tens of thousands of chemicals on the market, most never tested for safety, which should the EPA tackle first?
 

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News Release
Thursday, July 14, 2016

Children with high levels of the chemical bisphenol A in their bodies were more likely to have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder than those with lower levels of the chemical, according to a study published June 6 in the journal Environmental Research.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, June 17, 2016

EWG has uncovered new information about a toxic chemical many of us are buying at the grocery store – and how common it really is.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, June 17, 2016

For consumers who want to avoid bisphenol A, EWG today unveiled an easily searchable database of more than 16,000 food and beverage items that may come in cans, bottles or jars containing the hormone-disrupting chemical, better known as BPA. The list was compiled from a little-known food industry inventory and is now available at EWG's Food Scores database.

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News Release
Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Exposure to BPA has been linked to cancer, infertility, brain, nervous system and cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes, obesity and other serious disorders.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, November 9, 2015

The most egregious flaw of the United States’ toothless and outdated system of regulating chemicals is the failure to adequately and independently test chemicals for safety. Because of the Environmental Protection Agency’s woeful shortage of resources, manufacturers submit their own data to vouch for new chemicals, and most studies of existing chemicals are conducted by for-profit consultants selected and paid by the very companies whose products they’re evaluating.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, July 16, 2015

Conventional thinking about cancer prevention may overlook growing evidence that the combined effects of chemicals that are not carcinogenic on their own may be a significant cause of cancer, according to a new EWG analysis of a series of papers published last week in the scientific journal Carcinogenesis.

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News Release
Wednesday, June 3, 2015

You may know that bisphenol A, a synthetic estrogen found in the epoxy coatings of food cans, has been linked to many health problems. Many companies have publicly pledged to stop using BPA in their cans. But consumers like you have had no way to know which canned foods use BPA-based epoxy. Until now.

EWG analyzed 252 canned food brands, mostly between January and August 2014, to find out which of them packed their food into cans coated with BPA-laden epoxy. Here’s what we discovered.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, June 2, 2015

A new analysis of the canned food marketplace released today by EWG will help American shoppers determine which products still contain the toxic hormone disruptor bisphenol A, or BP

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News Release
Friday, May 8, 2015

The decision of a scientific advisory committee to add bisphenol A, or BPA, to California’s Proposition 65 list of toxic chemicals is a huge victory in the fight to protect people from this harmful hormone disruptor, Environmental Working Group said today.

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News Release
Friday, March 20, 2015

Sen. Diane Feinstein, D-Calif., introduced a bill yesterday that would help protect Americans from the toxic chemical bisphenol A, known as BPA, the Environmental Working Group said in a statement today.

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News Release
Thursday, January 8, 2015

The federal Food and Drug Administration has quietly reaffirmed its position that Americans are not being harmed by bisphenol A, a synthetic estrogen that is an essential ingredient of the epoxy coating that lines the insides of most food cans made in the U.S despite a massive body of evidence that suggests otherwise.  

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Several members of Congress are pushing a bill to better protect consumers – particularly the elderly, pregnant women children, and workers – from a known toxic hormone disruptor bisphenol-A, or BPA.

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