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Energy

EWG is working toward an energy future in which clean, safe and economical sources such as solar and wind power replace dirty, dangerous and expensive coal and nuclear power. We're also investigating the use and disposal of hazardous chemicals in oil and gas drilling, toxic gasoline additives such as corn ethanol and MTBE, uranium mining on public lands, and the transport of nuclear waste through American cities.  

Monday, October 23, 2006

Several years ago, concerned by the time and energy South African women spent fetching water from distant, often polluted sources, Trevor Fields decided to do something. Fields teamed up with an inventor to produce the PlayPump—a children’s merry-go-round, that when spun, pumps water from below ground to an above-ground storage tank. Each PlayPump costs about $14,000, but operating costs are nil since the pumps are run by kidpower.

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Thursday, October 19, 2006

Chevy is back it at with another ridiculous ad strategy. Since their "make your own" Tahoe advert was a flop, Chevy and John "whatever-my-middle-name-is-today" Mellencamp have teamed up to try a new angle--capitalizing on American icons like Rosa Parks and MLK, and tragedies like 9/11 and Katrina, to sell their new Silverados.

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Tuesday, October 10, 2006
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Friday, October 6, 2006

Faux news from The Onion.

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Wednesday, October 4, 2006

In the September issue of Fast Company, author Charles Fishman begins his story like this: Sitting humbly on shelves in stores everywhere is a product, priced at less than $3, that will change the world. Soon. It is a fairly ordinary item that nonetheless cuts to the heart of a half-dozen of the most profound, most urgent problems we face. Energy consumption. Rising gasoline costs and electric bills. Greenhouse-gas emissions. Dependence on coal and foreign oil. Global warming.

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Thursday, September 21, 2006

Britain’s Royal Society, of which both Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton were members, has asked Exxon Mobil to stop financing groups that create a “false sense somehow that there is a two-sided debate going on in the scientific community,” about the effects of global warming.

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Monday, September 11, 2006

Culminating a hike of several hundred miles, West Virginia grandfather Ed Wiley will arrive in Washington tomorrow to ask the federal government to help where his local officials’ resources fall short. Wiley, a former coal industry contractor, wants to see Marsh Fork Elementary moved from its current location, just yards from a coal silo he says makes kids sick--informal surveys indicate that many of Marsh Fork’s 220 students do have asthma or chronic bronchitis.

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Thursday, August 10, 2006

This summer, kids will be getting toy Hummers with their Happy Meals thanks to a new McDonald's promotion to bring “the fun and excitement of Hummer vehicles” to “McDonald’s youngest guests.” In a time of record gas prices, when even our oil-friendly leader has admitted that America is "addicted to oil," it seems a bit irresponsible for McDonald's to be advertising the Hummer to its youngest and most impressionable customers.

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Thursday, July 13, 2006

The U.S. would have imported about 20 percent less foreign oil in 2005 if automakers met federal fuel efficiency or miles per gallon (MPG) standards based on real world driving conditions. That reduction is equivalent to more than 1.3 times the amount of oil imported from Saudi Arabia in 2005, or about two million barrels of oil per day. For consumers this translates into 33 billion gallons of gasoline saved that year.

 
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Wednesday, July 5, 2006

As many of us celebrated the 50th birthday of our nation's highway system and the 230th birthday of America with a roadtrip, it's a good time to ask how we plan to get around for the next fifty years. Even greenies like me are not going to stop driving, so as a nation we'd better figure out how to stabilize gas prices.

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Wednesday, May 3, 2006

This shot was submitted by Susan A. from Dallas who would like to remind us that: "While consumers are paying record-breaking high prices for gasoline, former Exxon CEO Lee Raymond got a $400,000,000 compensation package in 2005."

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Wednesday, May 3, 2006

Congress and the Bush Administration have done nothing to solve the USA's addiction to fossil fuels. Even worse, they are subsidizing Big Oil at a time of record profits.

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Monday, May 1, 2006

Americans in 50 metro areas will pay $83 billion more for gasoline this year at $3 per gallon, compared to the prices they paid in February 2003 — and even more if prices continue to rise as expected, says a new Environmental Working Group (EWG) analysis that calculates the increased cost of gasoline per family in the 50 largest metro areas.

 
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Monday, February 20, 2006

Whether or not you agree with the Bush Administration on energy policy, one thing is clear: when a President brings up the need to become energy independent in a State of the Union address, public debate increases. And as Martha Stewart says, "that's a good thing."

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Thursday, February 2, 2006

It depends on what your definition of "import" is. Turns out the president was simply, well, exploiting American anxiety when he vowed during his State of the Union speech to break our addiction to Middle East oil in coming decades.

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Wednesday, October 19, 2005

The Bush administration continues to combat the country's energy problems with industry giveaways, now allowing oil and gas drilling permits on public lands to be issued without environmental reviews or citizen comment.

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Wednesday, October 19, 2005

Construction on 9,500 new oil and gas wells in western Colorado is creating erosion and runoff that's clogging towns' irrigation systems and raising cleanup costs.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2005

The LA Times has a funny piece about a band of subversive Parisian jokers terrorizing the SUV-driving population with deflated tires and mud-smeared windows.

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Wednesday, August 31, 2005

Drivers in sprawling southern cities with few transportation options are forced to send more of their gasoline dollars abroad, including to Middle East oil producers where an unknown amount of oil money flows to anti-American extremists. Amid rising gas prices and calls for energy independence, an original Environmental Working Group analysis of oil dependence by metro area underscores the urgent need to broaden transportation options for gridlocked, car-dependent communities in order to decrease reliance on Middle East oil sources and increase national security over the long hau

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Thursday, April 14, 2005

During debate over the energy bill in the House Committee on Energy and Commerce on Tuesday, Representatives Hall, Green, Murphy, Rogers, Pickering, and Committee Chair Barton, among others, voiced their opposition to any restrictions on future oil and gas exploration within the United States. The committee majority shot down a number of minority amendments, including an amendment by Rep. Stupak of Michigan to prohibit directional, slant, or offshore oil and gas drilling on the Great Lakes.

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