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National Drinking Water Database


Trichlorofluoromethane in New York


Trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11) is a refrigerant, solvent, chemical intermediate and halocarbon aerosol that was banned in 2000 under the Montreal Protocol because of its ozone-depleting properties. [read more]

The Most Polluted Communities in New York

16 water utilities reported detecting Trichlorofluoromethane in tap water since 2004, according to EWG's analysis of water quality data supplied by state water agencies

Ranked by highest average Trichlorofluoromethane level

RankSystem Population Served Positive test results of total reported tests Average Level
(Range)
1Chelsea Ridge Apartments
Wappingers Falls, NY
2,6822 of 20.93 ppb
(0.56 to 1.3 ppb)
2Bedford Hills/Taconic Corr. Facilities
Bedford Hills, NY
1,1001 of 10.5 ppb
(0.5 ppb)
3Balsam Crest Homeowners Assoc
NY
253 of 90.45 ppb
(0 to 2.75 ppb)
4Walters Mobile Home Village
New Windsor, NY
2501 of 30.3 ppb
(0 to 0.9 ppb)
5Carle Place Wd
Carle Place, NY
9,00524 of 1090.22 ppb
(0 to 1.8 ppb)
6Saranac Wd
Saranac, NY
2001 of 30.17 ppb
(0 to 0.5 ppb)
7Wild Oaks Water Company
Rockport, NY
8051 of 30.17 ppb
(0 to 0.5 ppb)
8Garden City (V)
Garden City, NY
21,68624 of 2590.14 ppb
(0 to 4 ppb)
9Mcwa, Genesee West
Rochester, NY
8002 of 30.12 ppb
(0 to 0.24 ppb)
10Hicksville Wd
Hicksville, NY
47,81029 of 1870.04 ppb
(0 to 0.8 ppb)

Health Based Limits for Trichlorofluoromethane

StandardDescriptionLevel
California Public Health GoalsDefined by the State of California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) as the level of contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. For acutely toxic substances, levels are set at which scientific evidence indicates that no known or anticipated adverse effects on health will occur, plus an adequate margin-of safety. PHGs for carcinogens or other substances which can cause chronic disease shall be based solely on health effects without regard to cost impacts and shall be set at levels which OEHHA has determined do not pose any significant risk to health.700 ppb
Lifetime health-based limit, non-cancer riskConcentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse, noncarcinogenic health effects for a lifetime of exposure. The Lifetime health-based limit (or Health Advisory, HA) is based on exposure for a a 70-kg adult consuming 2 liters of water per day. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.2000 ppb
Health-Based Screening LevelA benchmark concentration of contaminants in water that may be of potential concern for human health, if exceeded. For noncarcinogens, the HBSL represents the contaminant concentration in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse effects over a lifetime of exposure. For carcinogens, the HBSL range represents the contaminant concentration in drinking water that corresponds to an excess estimated lifetime cancer risk of 1 chance in 1 million to 1 chance in 10 thousand. Source: U.S. Geological Survey.2000 ppb
Children's health-based limit for 1-day exposureConcentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse, noncarcinogenic health effects for up to one day of exposure. The One-Day health-based limit (or Health Advisory, HA) is typically set to protect a 10-kg child consuming 1 liter of water per day. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.7000 ppb
Children's health-based limit for 10-day exposureConcentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse, noncarcinogenic effects for up to ten days of exposure. The Ten-Day health-based limit (or Health Advisory, HA) is typically set to protect a 10-kg child consuming 1 liter of water per day. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.7000 ppb
Drinking Water Equivalent LevelA lifetime exposure concentration protective of adverse, noncarcinogenic health effects, that assumes all of the exposure to a contaminant is from drinking water. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.10000 ppb

Violation Summary for Trichlorofluoromethane in New York

Data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency includes the following violations of federal standards in New York since 2004

Violation TypeNumber of Violations
Failure to monitor regularly174