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National Drinking Water Database


Manganese in Massachusetts


Manganese is a naturally occurring element released from mineral deposits as well as industrial use.

The Most Polluted Communities in Massachusetts

120 water utilities reported detecting Manganese in tap water since 2004, according to EWG's analysis of water quality data supplied by state water agencies

Ranked by highest average Manganese level

RankSystem Population Served Positive test results of total reported tests Average Level
(Range)
1Manchaug Water District of Sutton
Sutton, MA
50010 of 101212.33 ppb
(400 to 2600 ppb)
2Mohawk Village Apartments
Shirley, MA
509 of 9792.78 ppb
(145 to 1750 ppb)
3Stafford Heights Apartments
Charlton, MA
8012 of 12776.13 ppb
(577 to 927 ppb)
4Acton Water Supply District
Acton, MA
19,30518 of 18753.61 ppb
(90 to 2600 ppb)
5Juniper Hill Apartments
Charlton, MA
9522 of 22752.07 ppb
(501.5 to 1400 ppb)
6Codman Hill Condominium
Boxborough, MA
21620 of 20634.1 ppb
(570 to 760 ppb)
7Aquarion Water Company: Oxford
Oxford, MA
7,66611 of 11576.29 ppb
(18.5 to 2260 ppb)
8Lunenburg Water District
Lunenburg, MA
5,10015 of 15575.13 ppb
(75 to 1100 ppb)
9Holliston Water Department
Holliston, MA
14,82026 of 26514.68 ppb
(173.6 to 1600 ppb)
10Auburn Water District
Auburn, MA
9,90015 of 17479.79 ppb
(0 to 1850 ppb)

Health Based Limits for Manganese

StandardDescriptionLevel
EPA Human Health Water Quality CriteriaWater quality criteria set by the US EPA provide guidance for states and tribes authorized to establish water quality standards under the Clean Water Act (CWA) to protect human health. These are non-enforceable standards based upon exposure by both drinking water and the contribution of water contamination to other consumed foods. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.50 ppb
National Secondary Drinking Water RegulationsA National Secondary Drinking Water Regulation is a non-enforceable guideline regarding contaminants that may cause cosmetic effects (such as taste, odor, or color). Some states choose to adopt them as enforceable standards. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 50 ppb
Lifetime health-based limit, non-cancer riskConcentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse, noncarcinogenic health effects for a lifetime of exposure. The Lifetime health-based limit (or Health Advisory, HA) is based on exposure for a a 70-kg adult consuming 2 liters of water per day. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.300 ppb
Health-Based Screening LevelA benchmark concentration of contaminants in water that may be of potential concern for human health, if exceeded. For noncarcinogens, the HBSL represents the contaminant concentration in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse effects over a lifetime of exposure. For carcinogens, the HBSL range represents the contaminant concentration in drinking water that corresponds to an excess estimated lifetime cancer risk of 1 chance in 1 million to 1 chance in 10 thousand. Source: U.S. Geological Survey.300 ppb
Children's health-based limit for 1-day exposureConcentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse, noncarcinogenic health effects for up to one day of exposure. The One-Day health-based limit (or Health Advisory, HA) is typically set to protect a 10-kg child consuming 1 liter of water per day. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.1000 ppb
Children's health-based limit for 10-day exposureConcentration of a chemical in drinking water that is not expected to cause any adverse, noncarcinogenic effects for up to ten days of exposure. The Ten-Day health-based limit (or Health Advisory, HA) is typically set to protect a 10-kg child consuming 1 liter of water per day. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.1000 ppb
Drinking Water Equivalent LevelA lifetime exposure concentration protective of adverse, noncarcinogenic health effects, that assumes all of the exposure to a contaminant is from drinking water. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.1600 ppb

Violation Summary for Manganese in Massachusetts

Data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency includes the following violations of federal standards in Massachusetts since 2004

Violation TypeNumber of Violations
Failure to monitor regularly15