GROUP:

Adult Minority Leader Report


health & safety concerns:
chemicals found
on average indivi-
dual range
entire group
Brain and nervous system 29 23-35 36
Reproduction and fertility 28 22-34 35
Birth defects and developmental delays 3 3-3 3
Endocrine system 3 2-3 3
Hematologic (blood) system 2 2-2 2
Immune system (including sensitization and allergies) 2 2-2 2
Cancer 2 2-2 2
Chronic effects, general 2 1-2 2

Group members:

(5 People)

Dr. Beverly Wright
Vivian Chang
Jennifer Hill-Kelley
Suzie Canales
Jean Salone


Locations:

Corpus Christi, TX
Green Bay, WI
New Orleans, LA
Oakland, CA



picture of group

Group: Adult Minority Leader Report
Found 43-48 of 75 tested chemicals (5 participants)

The blood and urine of the "Adult Minority Leader Report" group contained 43-48 of 75 industrial compounds, pollutants and other chemicals tested, including chemicals linked to brain and nervous system toxicity, reproductive toxicity and fertility problems, and birth defects and developmental delays.

Summary of chemicals found in Adult Minority Leader Report

chemical family level found in group health effects exposure routes
Bisphenol A60% high
20% moderate
20% low
Polycarbonate plastics, food can linings, dental sealants
Lead60% moderate
40% low
Lead-based paint in older homes, household dust, vinyl products, tap water
Mercury40% high
20% moderate
40% low
Brain and nervous system Seafood, flu shots/vaccines, dental fillings
Methylmercury40% high
20% moderate
40% low
Dietary sources, particularly seafood
Nitro- and polycylic- musks80% high
20% moderate
Endocrine system Cosmetics, perfumes, cleaning agents, detergents, soaps
Perchlorate100% low
Hematologic (blood) system, Birth defects and developmental delays Contaminated food and drinking water
Perfluorochemicals (PFCs)40% high
60% low
Cancer, Birth defects and developmental delays, Endocrine system Stain- and grease-proof coatings on food packaging, couches, carpets, pans
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)40% high
40% moderate
20% low
Reproduction and fertility, Brain and nervous system Foam furniture, carpet padding, computers, televisions, contaminated house dust, food

Detailed report by chemical (return to summary)

bisphenol a & badge

1 of 1 found

Detected in polycarbonate plastic, dental sealants, and resins that line metal cans. Linked to hormone disruption, birth defects, cancer with effects at very low doses.

1.2ug/g creatinine in urine6.06


metals

3 of 3 found

Neurotoxic heavy metal linked to IQ deficits and behavioral problems. Found in dust from chipping lead paint in older homes, and in some tap water.

0.222ug/dL in whole blood4.7


Mercury is used in dental fillings and to preserve vaccines; it is also a common pollutant in seafood. Mercury harms brain development and function.

7.0E-5ug/L in whole blood12


Forms from mercury, a pollutant from coal-fired power plants and other sources. Methylmercury accumulates in seafood and harms brain development and function.

0.0735ug/L in whole blood25.9


nitro- and polycylic- musks

2 of 10 found

Fragrance ingredients. Build up in human tissues. May harm hormone system.

0.0547ng/g in blood serum4.23


Total Nitro- and polycylic- musks

Synthetic fragrance in cosmetics, cleaning agents, detergents, air fresheners, perfumes. Suspected hormone disruptor. Prevents cells from blocking entry of toxins in animal study. Bioaccumulative.

0.0547ng/g in blood serum3.6


Synthetic fragrance in cosmetics, detergents, cigarettes. Suspected hormone disruptor. Prevents cells from blocking entry of toxins in animal study. Bioaccumulative.

0.11ng/g in blood serum1.6


perchlorate

1 of 1 found

Explosive component of solid rocket and missile fuel. Widespread contaminant of food, drinking water, and people. Disrupts thyroid hormones, particularly in women with lower iodide intake; may harm brain development.

0.2ug/L in urine5.6


perfluorochemicals (pfcs)

7 of 13 found

Includes Teflon, Scotchgard, Stainmaster. Linked to cancer and birth defects.

2.63ng/mL in blood serum77.7


Total Perfluorochemicals (PFCs)

Breakdown product of stain- and grease-proof coatings on food packaging, couches, carpets. A 10-carbon version of PFOA; persistent; bioaccumulative.

0.218ng/mL in blood serum1.47


Breakdown product of stain- and grease-proof coatings on food packaging, couches, carpets. A 9-carbon version of PFOA; persistent; bioaccumulative.

0.283ng/mL in blood serum5.85


Used to make Teflon pan coatings; breakdown product of stain- and grease-proof coatings. Likely human carcinogen. Found in most people. Being phased out of some products.

0.366ng/mL in blood serum10.1


In Scotchgard prior to 2000 - part of the 'PFOS chemistry' phased out of use by 3M in 2000 over health concerns; metabolized into PFOS by the body.

  • geometric mean: 0.235 ng/mL in blood serum (vs. 12 in CDC biomonitoring [1])
  • found in 2 of 5 people in the group (vs. 2,091 of 2,368 in CDC biomonitoring)
  • found in: Dr. Beverly Wright, Jean Salone
0ng/mL in blood serum1.08


Breakdown product of stain- and grease-proof coatings on food packaging, couches, carpets. An 11-carbon version of PFOA; persistent; bioaccumulative.

0ng/mL in blood serum1.76


In fire fighting foams and carpet treatments. Phased out of consumer products by 3M in 2000 over health concerns.

0ng/mL in blood serum13.1


Active ingredient in Scotchgard prior to 2000. Phase out forced by EPA because concentrations in human blood close to levels that harm lab animals.

1.07ng/mL in blood serum64.1


polybrominated diphenyl ethers (pbdes)

29-34 of 46 found

Fire retardants in furniture foam, computers, and televisions. Accumulate in human tissues. May harm brain development.

1.11ng/g lipids in blood serum314


Total Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)

Brominated fire retardants used in polyurethan foam and plastics. These PBDEs are neurotoxic and persist in people and the environment. They were withdrawn from the market in the U.S. in 2005.

  • geometric mean: 0.0134 ng/g lipids in blood serum (vs. 0.0087 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in 1 of 5 people in the group (vs. 8 of 76 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in: Vivian Chang
0.0151ng/g lipids in blood serum0.0606


0.00566ng/g lipids in blood serum3.23


Brominated flame retardants used in plastics. Break down into more toxic and persistent forms in the environment. Withdrawn from the market in the U.S. in 2005.

0.0122ng/g lipids in blood serum4.31


  • geometric mean: 0.0169 ng/g lipids in blood serum (vs. 0.0117 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in 3 of 5 people in the group (vs. 32 of 76 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in: Dr. Beverly Wright, Vivian Chang, Suzie Canales
0.00588ng/g lipids in blood serum0.782


Brominated fire retardants used in foam and plastics. Break down into more toxic and persistent forms in the environment. Withdrawn from the market in the U.S. in 2005.

0.0262ng/g lipids in blood serum0.59


0.0025ng/g lipids in blood serum0.54


0.238ng/g lipids in blood serum76.9


0.0068ng/g lipids in blood serum2.73


0.0184ng/g lipids in blood serum0.488


Brominated fire retardants currently used in plastics and fabric. The major use is in electronic devices; the minor use is as a backcoating on industrial fabrics. Are directly toxic to mammals and breakdown to more dangerous forms in the environment.

0ng/g lipids in blood serum19.9


0ng/g lipids in blood serum19


0ng/g lipids in blood serum14.7


Brominated flame retardants used in plastics. Break down into more toxic and persistent forms in the environment. Withdrawn from the market in the U.S. in 2005.

0ng/g lipids in blood serum16.5


Brominated fire retardants used in polyurethan foam and plastics. These PBDEs are neurotoxic and persist in people and the environment. They were withdrawn from the market in the U.S. in 2005.

0.00528ng/g lipids in blood serum32.6


  • geometric mean: 0.0424 ng/g lipids in blood serum (vs. 0.0171 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in 3 of 5 people in the group (vs. 3 of 76 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in: Jennifer Hill-Kelley, Vivian Chang, Jean Salone
0.032ng/g lipids in blood serum0.251


  • geometric mean: 0.0457 ng/g lipids in blood serum (vs. 0.0116 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in 2 of 5 people in the group (vs. 25 of 76 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in: Vivian Chang, Jean Salone
0.0121ng/g lipids in blood serum0.27


0.000971ng/g lipids in blood serum2.27


In PBDE chemical family - fire retardant in furniture foam, computers, televisions; may harm brain development and hormone systems.

0.0786ng/g lipids in blood serum31.2


Brominated fire retardants used in polyurethan foam and plastics. These PBDEs are neurotoxic and persist in people and the environment. They were withdrawn from the market in the U.S. in 2005.

In PBDE chemical family - fire retardant in furniture foam, computers, televisions; may harm brain development and hormone systems.

0.33ng/g lipids in blood serum143


0.0158ng/g lipids in blood serum1.26


  • geometric mean: 0.0317 ng/g lipids in blood serum (vs. 0.00557 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in 3 of 5 people in the group (vs. 28 of 76 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in: Jennifer Hill-Kelley, Vivian Chang, Jean Salone
0.00522ng/g lipids in blood serum0.191


0.0224ng/g lipids in blood serum1.33


0.008ng/g lipids in blood serum0.273


  • geometric mean: 0.0371 ng/g lipids in blood serum (vs. 0.00491 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in 3 of 5 people in the group (vs. 27 of 76 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in: Vivian Chang, Jennifer Hill-Kelley, Jean Salone
0.00386ng/g lipids in blood serum0.128


0.00643ng/g lipids in blood serum0.823


Brominated fire retardants used in polyurethan foam and plastics. These PBDEs are neurotoxic and persist in people and the environment. They were withdrawn from the market in the U.S. in 2005.

0.0141ng/g lipids in blood serum0.673


0.0385ng/g lipids in blood serum6.17


  • geometric mean: 0.0428 ng/g lipids in blood serum (vs. 0.00418 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in 2 of 5 people in the group (vs. 3 of 76 in all EWG/Commonweal studies)
  • found in: Dr. Beverly Wright, Jean Salone
0.00766ng/g lipids in blood serum0.102


0.00866ng/g lipids in blood serum0.386


References/Notes

[1] CDC (2005). National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Centers for Disease Control. http://www.cdc.gov/exposurereport/. (Methylmercury results have been compared to total mercury in CDC biomonitoring.)

[2] The chemicals co-eluted in the laboratory analysis.