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Nailed

Endocrine Disruptor In Nail Polishes Gets Into Women’s Bodies

Nailed

Monday, October 19, 2015

by Johanna Congleton, Senior Scientist

Nailed

Endocrine Disruptor In Nail Polishes Gets Into Women’s Bodies

It’s not surprising that many nail polishes contain potentially toxic chemicals. Now a study conducted by researchers at Duke University and EWG finds that at least one of those chemicals could be ending up in your body.

Triphenyl phosphate, or TPHP, a suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical, is commonly used to make plastics and as a fire retardant in foam furniture. And if you wear nail polish, it could be in your body too.

Researchers at Duke University tested the urine of 26 women who had recently painted their nails and found evidence of TPHP in every participant. Evidence of the chemical in the women’s urine increased sharply after they applied the nail polish.

TPHP is listed on the ingredient labels of a wide array of nail polishes now on the market. Out of more than 3,000 nail products in EWG’s Skin Deep database, half disclose the use of TPHP.*

Here’s where we found it: 

Want to know more about TPHP and how you can avoid it? Click here to read the full report.