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News Releases

Thursday, September 29, 2005
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) next month will release 250,000-acres for oil and gas development in the heart of New Mexico's Otero Mesa — despite strong local opposition from the governor, the attorney general, a U.S. senator, ranchers, hunters, conservationists and thousands of other New Mexicans.
Key Issues: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2005
Two national environmental organizations, Environmental Working Group and Beyond Pesticides, joined today with the Fluoride Action Network in challenging the safety of new food tolerances issued by the EPA for the fluoride based pesticide, sulfuryl fluoride.
Wednesday, September 14, 2005
The federal government is about to make a deal to give a few hundred California farmers control of more water than Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego combined use in a year — at pennies on the dollar of the price paid by urban water users.
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Wednesday, August 31, 2005
Policy needs to change at the federal and state levels. For decades, federal transportation dollars have gone overwhelmingly to road projects. State transportation spending has also favored roads over transit. "We built the national highway system in the 1950s to protect us from Cold War threats," said Wiles. "But the world has changed and the threats to our security have changed. We need to change our transportation system to reflect 21st century security needs."
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Wednesday, August 3, 2005
Some of America's richest agribusinesses are double dipping from U.S. taxpayers' pockets at a rate of hundreds of millions of dollars a year, according to an Environmental Working Group (EWG) computer investigation of federal crop and water subsidies to California's Central Valley Project (CVP).
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Thursday, July 21, 2005
For $2 an acre, the Bush Administration has given the rights to drill for oil and gas on New Mexico's Otero Mesa to a company whose White House connections were key to reversing earlier plans to protect much of the area from drilling.
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Monday, July 11, 2005
A EPA draft risk assessment says MTBE, the gasoline additive that has contaminated drinking water in at least 29 states, is a "likely" human carcinogen, according to agency sources.
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Monday, July 11, 2005
The legislation, entitled the "Kids-Safe Chemicals Act of 2005," contains much-needed fundamental reforms of TSCA, the nation's notoriously weak chemical safety law. TSCA has not been reformed in nearly 30 years.
Tuesday, June 28, 2005
A panel comprised mostly of independent scientists advising the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has found today that DuPont's Teflon chemical, PFOA, is a "likely human carcinogen."
Monday, June 6, 2005
The Wall Street Journal reported that Dr. Elise Bassin's research finding that boys drinking fluoridated water face an increased risk of bone cancer will soon be published in a peer-reviewed journal. Dr. Bassin's research has been at the center of an ethics investigation of her PhD advisor at Harvard, Dr. Chester Douglass.
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Friday, June 3, 2005
A major investigation by The Press-Enterprise of Riverside, Calif., reveals that an industry-funded study relied on by federal scientists to recommend a safe dose for perchlorate erroneously reported that healthy adults were not affected by low doses.
Wednesday, June 1, 2005
In a letter to all U.S. senators, the chief legal officers of 12 states from New York to California are urging lawmakers to vote against the federal energy bill or any legislation that protects oil companies from lawsuits over drinking water contaminated with the toxic gasoline additive MTBE.
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Wednesday, June 1, 2005
In a letter to all U.S. senators, the chief legal officers of 12 states from New York to California are urging lawmakers to vote against the federal energy bill or any legislation that protects oil companies from lawsuits over drinking water contaminated with the toxic gasoline additive MTBE.
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Tuesday, May 24, 2005
A prominent U.S. senator introduced legislation Tuesday to limit federal water subsidies to the richest corporate farms — a measure that could reduce the flow of cheap, taxpayer-subsidized water to many of the biggest agribusinesses in California and other Western states.
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Monday, May 23, 2005
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has come out against a provision in the federal energy bill shielding oil companies from lawsuits over water pollution by the toxic gasoline additive MTBE — a stance at odds with his fellow Republicans in the California congressional delegation, who all voted for it.
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Thursday, May 19, 2005
As Congress prepares to vote on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) budget for the next year, U.S. Representatives Hilda Solis of California and Tim Bishop of New York will introduce an amendment that would bar the Agency from using staff time or money to analyze data from pesticide tests on human subjects. Their amendment also bars the EPA from conducting human pesticide experiments on its own.
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Friday, May 13, 2005
Commissioner Thomas Moore of the federal government's Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) shares Environmental Working Group's (EWG) concern that children playing on decks, play sets and other structures made of arsenic-treated lumber may develop cancer later in life from arsenic that rubs off the wood and sticks to children's skin.
Friday, May 6, 2005
The penalty DuPont will reportedly pay for covering up its pollution of newborn American babies with the cancer-causing Teflon chemical will likely be $15 million. This sum amounts to just 8 percent of the maximum allowable fine.
Thursday, April 28, 2005
The California Air Resources Board today adopted the nation's most stringent smog standards, which state scientists say could avert hundreds of premature deaths, thousands of hospital trips and more than 3 million school absences of asthmatic children.
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Tuesday, April 26, 2005
An EWG Action Fund analysis of the Specter/Leahy asbestos bill before the Senate Judiciary Committee today finds that the legislation delivers unusually harsh treatment to people dying of asbestos-caused lung cancer.
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