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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Today the National Academy of Sciences released a report confirming that dioxin, the byproduct of several industries, is a potent carcinogen. In a 2005 investigation, Environmental Working Group (EWG) researchers tested the umbilical cord blood of 10 newborn babies, and found that all of them had dioxins in their blood from the moment they were born.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, July 7, 2006

This week the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established a 30-day public comment period for a motion filed by three watchdog groups that seeks an immediate suspension of all food uses of the pesticide sulfuryl fluoride.

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News Release
Monday, June 26, 2006

The BBC reports that a study commissioned by Greenpeace reveals consumers want more environmentally friendly PCs. What's so bad about computers? Well--they contain, among other nasty chemicals: lead, arsenic, fire retardants, cadmium, chromium, and mercury. And that's only in the final product--making the machine requires 10 times its weight in chemicals and fossil fuels.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, June 22, 2006

As Reported in the L.A. Times, a recent study of teeneagers in Los Angeles and New York found that contaminants in indoor air made up 40-50% of participants' cancer risk. The two main culprits cited were Formaldehyde, from shelving, cabinets, and pressed-wood furnishings, and dichlorobenzene used in solid toilet deodorizers and mothballs.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, June 2, 2006

In a real-life epilogue to "Erin Brockovich," a peer-reviewed medical journal will retract a fraudulent article written and placed by a science-for-hire consulting firm whose CEO sits on a key federal toxics panel. The retraction follows a six-month internal review by the journal, prompted by an EWG investigation.

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News Release
Tuesday, May 16, 2006

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, surveys last year in the Bay area found detecable levels of ibuprofen, DEET and other chemicals, Prozac, and a handful of antibiotics in streams and rivers.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 10, 2006
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, May 10, 2006

The unique bond between a mother and daughter starts in the womb and lasts a lifetime. This Mother's Day, lab tests of mothers and their daughters show that they share another, unwanted bond: a common body burden of industrial chemicals that can be passed down across generations.

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News Release
Tuesday, April 25, 2006

 

In today's Des Moines Register, Hope Burwell proposes that the nuclear energy industry use post-Chernobyl Belarus as a research opportunity for studying the long-term consequences of, and solutions to radiation exposure.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 19, 2006

From NPR's Morning Edition: Teflon may make a great plate of scrambled eggs, but it also may make for a kitchen full of toxic fumes. That is the issue behind a class action lawsuit against the maker of the non-stick coating, DuPont.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 17, 2006

Bush Administration Plan Would Erode Californians' Right to Know About Chemical Pollution in Their Communities

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Sunday, April 9, 2006

For over 20 years, scientists have documented the appearance of a summertime "Dead Zone" that all but obliterates marine life in what is arguably the nation's most important fishery, the Gulf of Mexico. Each year the Dead Zone grows to an area that is roughly the size of New Jersey - ranging from 5,000 to 8,000 square miles.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 8, 2006

The House votes today on a bill pitting giant food companies against the health and safety of American families—a measure that could nullify state laws warning consumers about mercury in fish, lead in candy, arsenic in bottled water, benzene in soft drinks and dozens of other dangers.

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News Release
Friday, March 3, 2006

Following a published report that the Bush Administration is holding up a study that shows most Americans carry a toxic rocket fuel chemical in their bodies at levels close to federal safety limits, Environmental Working Group (EWG) is calling for the immediate release of the study so EPA and state agencies can take steps to protect the public.

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News Release
Friday, February 24, 2006

Tomato giant Ag-Mart couldn't be in bigger trouble in North Carolina for alleged pesticide violations that may have caused birth defects in three field workers' children, but the state ag department says it's powerless to ensure that the company shapes up.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, February 16, 2006

The people who know DuPont best – its workers – have launched a website that pulls no punches about the company’s health and safety practices. “Throughout its history, DuPont has ignored scientific evidence whenever it threatens to hurt company profits,” reads the home page.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, February 3, 2006

A new study from the University of California Berkeley found that combinations of low doses of toxic chemicals can be more harmful than any of the chemicals alone, suggesting that the vacuum EPA and other government agencies study individual chemicals' toxicity in does not mirror conditions in the real world.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 30, 2006

Today, a panel of outside experts gave draft comments to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) saying that an indestructible, toxic chemical that pollutes nearly every American's blood is a "likely human carcinogen."

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News Release
Wednesday, January 25, 2006

EWG commends the professional staff and leadership at EPA for forging a stewardship agreement with major companies that will, if properly implemented, dramatically reduce, and eventually eliminate, pollution associated with the chemical known as PFOA, and related chemicals that break down to become PFOA and similar substances. These toxic chemicals pose numerous health risks, are extraordinarily persistent in the environment, and have already found their way into the blood of people worldwide, including most Americans.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, January 13, 2006

It is the category of industrial chemicals that, by consensus, scientists and government regulators the world over worry most about: substances that persist in the environment, accumulate in wildlife and people, and pose worrisome health risks for decades.

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News Release

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