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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

GroovyGreen brings us this video about GreenSprings Natural Cemetery in New York. It's a good intro to the philosophies and practices behind the growing green burial movement. Green burials strive for a true "dust to dust" approach.

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Wednesday, November 8, 2006

A report in the Lancet, considered the world's most prestigious medical journal, warns of ''a silent pandemic” of impaired brain development due to exposure to unregulated industrial toxins, both in the womb and during a child’s first years.

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Tuesday, November 7, 2006

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology finds that exposure to carpeting and other materials in the workplace significantly increases adults' risk of developing asthma. Carpet contains over 100 known toxins including benzene, formaldehyde, and flame-retardants. Added features like stain resistance increase the number of toxins.
[ via : Reuters ]

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Thursday, November 2, 2006

A new website by Harvard School of Public Health lets visitors tally their risk for several types of cancer, as well as heart disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, and stroke. Users input their age and gender and some more specific info about their lifestyle to get personalized risk level comparisons for a given disease against those of others in the same demographic.

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Monday, October 30, 2006

Exposure to a rocket fuel chemical widespread in the U.S. drinking water and food supply, at levels equal to or lower than national and state standards, could cause thyroid deficiency in more than 2 million women of childbearing age who would require medical treatment to protect their unborn babies, according to an Environmental Working Group (EWG) analysis of new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

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Thursday, October 26, 2006

Last month we reported on the outrage of some distinguished Harvard alums over a suspiciously closed-door “investigation” that cleared Harvard professor Chester Douglass of charges that he covered up links—revealed by federally-funded research—between fluoridated water and bone cancer in boys. He's the same Harvard doc who is a paid consultant for Colgate toothpaste, which is clearly pro-fluoride, and who donated $1 million to the university's dental school in 2001.

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Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Today the New York Times reports some disturbing news about certain drugs and cosmetics causing preschoolers to go into puberty. In one case, a girl and her brother--whose father had been using a testosterone skin cream--started growing pubic hair just from skin contact with their father. Her brother also developed some aggressive behavior problems. The article cites some 1998 cases of early breast development in young girls brought on by a shampoo which contained estrogen and placental extract.

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Thursday, October 12, 2006

Last week California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) signed a bill to establish a state-wide biomonitoring program aimed at helping to identify populations at-risk from long-term chemical exposures as well as isolate the trends that put certain groups in harm’s way. According to Environmental Science & Technology, public health officials are gaining confidence in the importance of biomonitoring as the method has helped uncover hidden threats as it did with an arsenic-laden skin cream in New York City.

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Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Dupont has announced its new sustainability initiative which includes, among other goals, a reduction of air carcinogen emissions and submission to independent third-party verification of environmental management practices at all global manufacturing facilities. Our friend Jeff McIntire-Strasburg of Sustainablog has more to offer on Dupont's announcement.

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Friday, October 6, 2006

The EU is considering banning embalming fluid which contains formaldehyde, a potent carcinogen. Proponents of the ban are concerned about the chemical’s potential to leach into the ground. The Wall Street Journal writes today of the resistance to the ban from some folks in Ireland, as well as the U.S.-based Dodge Company that manufactures most of the stuff. The Green Burial Council, committed to encouraging greener burial processes, views embalming as an anachronism for which “there's not one shred of evidence that suggests [it] provides any public health benefits.” The Irish who oppose the ban argue that the ban is an obstacle to holding a proper Irish wake, which can take several days to plan and orchestrate.

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Wednesday, October 4, 2006

A startling new study by the federal Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says minute traces of a toxic rocket fuel chemical found in milk, fruit vegetables and drinking water supplies nationwide lowers essential thyroid hormones in women.

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Monday, October 2, 2006

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Too much testosterone can kill brain cells, researchers said on Tuesday in a finding that may help explain why steroid abuse can cause behaviorchanges like aggressiveness and suicidal tendencies. [...] Ehrlich's team tried the same thing with the "female" hormone estrogen, just to be fair. "We were surprised, but it actually looks like estrogen is neuroprotective. If anything, there is less cell death in the presence of estrogen," she said. [...] "Next time a muscle-bound guy in a sports car cuts you off on the highway, don't get mad -- just take a deep breath and realize that it might not be his fault," Ehrlich said in a statement.

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Tuesday, September 26, 2006

This week, the October 2006 issue of National Geographic magazine is hitting newsstands and mailboxes with an important, ground-breaking feature story: "Pollution Within." The piece chronicles the pollution of author David Ewing Duncan's body with hundreds of industrial chemicals.

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Monday, September 25, 2006

SHANGHAI (AFP) - Hundreds of angry Chinese women have taken to the streets of Shanghai demanding refunds for US-Japanese cosmetics after authorities detected banned chemicals in some of the products.

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Thursday, September 21, 2006

 

“It really shows how peer review has just turned into some form of pixie dust that is sprinkled over studies so that they can save companies money when they run into regulatory problems.”

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Wednesday, September 20, 2006

Several schools and institutions are instituting fragrance-free policies to reduce unnecessary incidence of migraines and respiratory irritation. Yep. Those fancy, sweet smelling fragrances that can cost 50 bucks a bottle contain volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) which contribute to poor indoor air quality and can trigger headaches; eye, nose, and throat irritation, and nausea. Fragrances may also contain certain phthalates, suspected of disrupting hormones and linked to reproductive problems.

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Friday, September 15, 2006

It looks like Environmental Working Group aren’t the only ones that have a bone to pick with Harvard. At least 17 Harvard alumni, including several leading public health experts, have voiced serious concerns about the ethics inquiry of Dr. Chester Douglass by the university. Douglass has been accused of misrepresenting the research of one of his graduate students that linked fluoride to bone cancer in boys. Why might he do this? Douglass is an employee of Colgate toothpaste, a leading advocate of fluoride.

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Tuesday, September 5, 2006

new report suggests that childhood PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) exposure can make children’s diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations less effective.

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Friday, September 1, 2006

Drug Firms Use Financial Clout To Push Industry Agenda at FDA: The Food and Drug Administration is bargaining with the pharmaceutical industry for an increase in fees, giving the industry a greater role in shaping the priorities of its regulator.

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Wednesday, August 30, 2006

The Washington Post reported on a report by the National Research Center for Women & Families showing that expert panels assembled by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are often biased towards approving new drugs.

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