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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Highlights

Senate Panel Votes to Tighten U.S. Chemicals Regulation Law Read More
BPA May Put Kids at Greater Risk of Obesity, Study Says Read More

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The Latest on Toxics

Monday, August 21, 2006

New Research from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences suggests that the "fresh" smell of many air fresheners is a result of the ingredient1,4 dichlorobenzene (1,4 DCB) which has been found to impair lung function. 1,4 DCB is also found in toilet bowl cleaners, mothballs and various other "deodorizing" products. "The best way to protect yourself, especially children who may have asthma or other respiratory illnesses, is to reduce the use of products and materials that contain these compounds." [via Effect Measure]

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Thursday, August 17, 2006

Several links for recent news.

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Friday, August 11, 2006

On August 2, an official from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) told the Senate's Environment and Public Works Committee that our nation's law governing industrial chemicals needs to be dramatically changed.

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Monday, August 7, 2006

Recently there's been plenty of debate within scientific, regulatory, and public health circles about the role of industry funding in scientific research and on government advisory panels--with robust arguments from each side. But almost everyone--including the FDA, the American Chemistry Council, and the Society of Toxicology agree on one point: full disclosure of professional associations and financial interests is the bare minimum necessary to safeguard the public interest.

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006

On Sunday, the New York Times ran a piece on PZEV’s, or Partial Zero Emissions Vehicles. PZEV’s are poorly marketed versions of the most popular cars on the road. The difference? They have better pollution-control systems than their identical counterparts—so much better that PZEV’s are 70 percent cleaner than vehicles that already meet “low emissions” standards. Sounds a little strange?

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Monday, July 31, 2006

This week the LA Times brings us Altered Oceans, a five-part multimedia expose on the crisis in our seas, and the implications of being at a "tipping point" in marine history.

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Friday, July 28, 2006

Several articles from recent news.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Today the National Academy of Sciences released a report confirming that dioxin, the byproduct of several industries, is a potent carcinogen. In a 2005 investigation, Environmental Working Group (EWG) researchers tested the umbilical cord blood of 10 newborn babies, and found that all of them had dioxins in their blood from the moment they were born.

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Friday, July 7, 2006

This week the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established a 30-day public comment period for a motion filed by three watchdog groups that seeks an immediate suspension of all food uses of the pesticide sulfuryl fluoride.

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News Release
Monday, June 26, 2006

The BBC reports that a study commissioned by Greenpeace reveals consumers want more environmentally friendly PCs. What's so bad about computers? Well--they contain, among other nasty chemicals: lead, arsenic, fire retardants, cadmium, chromium, and mercury. And that's only in the final product--making the machine requires 10 times its weight in chemicals and fossil fuels.

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Thursday, June 22, 2006

As Reported in the L.A. Times, a recent study of teeneagers in Los Angeles and New York found that contaminants in indoor air made up 40-50% of participants' cancer risk. The two main culprits cited were Formaldehyde, from shelving, cabinets, and pressed-wood furnishings, and dichlorobenzene used in solid toilet deodorizers and mothballs.

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Friday, June 2, 2006

In a real-life epilogue to "Erin Brockovich," a peer-reviewed medical journal will retract a fraudulent article written and placed by a science-for-hire consulting firm whose CEO sits on a key federal toxics panel. The retraction follows a six-month internal review by the journal, prompted by an EWG investigation.

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News Release
Tuesday, May 16, 2006

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, surveys last year in the Bay area found detecable levels of ibuprofen, DEET and other chemicals, Prozac, and a handful of antibiotics in streams and rivers.

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Wednesday, May 10, 2006
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Wednesday, May 10, 2006

The unique bond between a mother and daughter starts in the womb and lasts a lifetime. This Mother's Day, lab tests of mothers and their daughters show that they share another, unwanted bond: a common body burden of industrial chemicals that can be passed down across generations.

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News Release
Tuesday, April 25, 2006

 

In today's Des Moines Register, Hope Burwell proposes that the nuclear energy industry use post-Chernobyl Belarus as a research opportunity for studying the long-term consequences of, and solutions to radiation exposure.

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EnviroBlog
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Wednesday, April 19, 2006

From NPR's Morning Edition: Teflon may make a great plate of scrambled eggs, but it also may make for a kitchen full of toxic fumes. That is the issue behind a class action lawsuit against the maker of the non-stick coating, DuPont.

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EnviroBlog
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Monday, April 17, 2006

Bush Administration Plan Would Erode Californians' Right to Know About Chemical Pollution in Their Communities

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Sunday, April 9, 2006

For over 20 years, scientists have documented the appearance of a summertime "Dead Zone" that all but obliterates marine life in what is arguably the nation's most important fishery, the Gulf of Mexico. Each year the Dead Zone grows to an area that is roughly the size of New Jersey - ranging from 5,000 to 8,000 square miles.

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Wednesday, March 8, 2006

The House votes today on a bill pitting giant food companies against the health and safety of American families—a measure that could nullify state laws warning consumers about mercury in fish, lead in candy, arsenic in bottled water, benzene in soft drinks and dozens of other dangers.

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