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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Highlights

Senate Panel Votes to Tighten U.S. Chemicals Regulation Law Read More
BPA May Put Kids at Greater Risk of Obesity, Study Says Read More

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The Latest on Toxics

Monday, September 25, 2006

SHANGHAI (AFP) - Hundreds of angry Chinese women have taken to the streets of Shanghai demanding refunds for US-Japanese cosmetics after authorities detected banned chemicals in some of the products.

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Thursday, September 21, 2006

 

“It really shows how peer review has just turned into some form of pixie dust that is sprinkled over studies so that they can save companies money when they run into regulatory problems.”

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Wednesday, September 20, 2006

Several schools and institutions are instituting fragrance-free policies to reduce unnecessary incidence of migraines and respiratory irritation. Yep. Those fancy, sweet smelling fragrances that can cost 50 bucks a bottle contain volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) which contribute to poor indoor air quality and can trigger headaches; eye, nose, and throat irritation, and nausea. Fragrances may also contain certain phthalates, suspected of disrupting hormones and linked to reproductive problems.

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Friday, September 15, 2006

It looks like Environmental Working Group aren’t the only ones that have a bone to pick with Harvard. At least 17 Harvard alumni, including several leading public health experts, have voiced serious concerns about the ethics inquiry of Dr. Chester Douglass by the university. Douglass has been accused of misrepresenting the research of one of his graduate students that linked fluoride to bone cancer in boys. Why might he do this? Douglass is an employee of Colgate toothpaste, a leading advocate of fluoride.

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Tuesday, September 5, 2006

new report suggests that childhood PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) exposure can make children’s diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations less effective.

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Friday, September 1, 2006

Drug Firms Use Financial Clout To Push Industry Agenda at FDA: The Food and Drug Administration is bargaining with the pharmaceutical industry for an increase in fees, giving the industry a greater role in shaping the priorities of its regulator.

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Wednesday, August 30, 2006

The Washington Post reported on a report by the National Research Center for Women & Families showing that expert panels assembled by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are often biased towards approving new drugs.

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Wednesday, August 23, 2006

Paul Watson's poignant reflections on the over-exploitation of our seas and the toxicity of today's catch. [New Zealand Herald]

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Tuesday, August 22, 2006

The London Sunday Times reports that Madonna has been "lobbying the government and nuclear industry over a scheme to clean up radioactive waste with a supposedly magic Kabbalah fluid." Both she and her husband, Guy Ritchie are promoting a water-based “mystical” liquid solution that has allegedly proved successful in neutralising dangerous nuclear waste in Ukraine. One official--presumably at British Nuclear Fuels-- had this to say about Madonna's proposal: “It was like a crank call . . . the scientific mechanisms and principles were just bollocks, basically.”

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Monday, August 21, 2006

New Research from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences suggests that the "fresh" smell of many air fresheners is a result of the ingredient1,4 dichlorobenzene (1,4 DCB) which has been found to impair lung function. 1,4 DCB is also found in toilet bowl cleaners, mothballs and various other "deodorizing" products. "The best way to protect yourself, especially children who may have asthma or other respiratory illnesses, is to reduce the use of products and materials that contain these compounds." [via Effect Measure]

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Thursday, August 17, 2006

Several links for recent news.

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Friday, August 11, 2006

On August 2, an official from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) told the Senate's Environment and Public Works Committee that our nation's law governing industrial chemicals needs to be dramatically changed.

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Monday, August 7, 2006

Recently there's been plenty of debate within scientific, regulatory, and public health circles about the role of industry funding in scientific research and on government advisory panels--with robust arguments from each side. But almost everyone--including the FDA, the American Chemistry Council, and the Society of Toxicology agree on one point: full disclosure of professional associations and financial interests is the bare minimum necessary to safeguard the public interest.

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006

On Sunday, the New York Times ran a piece on PZEV’s, or Partial Zero Emissions Vehicles. PZEV’s are poorly marketed versions of the most popular cars on the road. The difference? They have better pollution-control systems than their identical counterparts—so much better that PZEV’s are 70 percent cleaner than vehicles that already meet “low emissions” standards. Sounds a little strange?

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Monday, July 31, 2006

This week the LA Times brings us Altered Oceans, a five-part multimedia expose on the crisis in our seas, and the implications of being at a "tipping point" in marine history.

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Friday, July 28, 2006

Several articles from recent news.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Today the National Academy of Sciences released a report confirming that dioxin, the byproduct of several industries, is a potent carcinogen. In a 2005 investigation, Environmental Working Group (EWG) researchers tested the umbilical cord blood of 10 newborn babies, and found that all of them had dioxins in their blood from the moment they were born.

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Friday, July 7, 2006

This week the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established a 30-day public comment period for a motion filed by three watchdog groups that seeks an immediate suspension of all food uses of the pesticide sulfuryl fluoride.

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Monday, June 26, 2006

The BBC reports that a study commissioned by Greenpeace reveals consumers want more environmentally friendly PCs. What's so bad about computers? Well--they contain, among other nasty chemicals: lead, arsenic, fire retardants, cadmium, chromium, and mercury. And that's only in the final product--making the machine requires 10 times its weight in chemicals and fossil fuels.

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Thursday, June 22, 2006

As Reported in the L.A. Times, a recent study of teeneagers in Los Angeles and New York found that contaminants in indoor air made up 40-50% of participants' cancer risk. The two main culprits cited were Formaldehyde, from shelving, cabinets, and pressed-wood furnishings, and dichlorobenzene used in solid toilet deodorizers and mothballs.

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