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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Sunday, December 22, 2013

The federal Food and Drug administration has announced proposed rules that could drive unnecessary and potentially dangerous products from the market -- antibacterial hand soaps like those marketed by Dial, Softsoap and CVS.

This is a big deal.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Washington, D.C. ­ The Food and Drug Administration's proposal to require manufacturers to prove antibacterial hand soaps are safe and better than plain soap and water is a sign that the agency is finally “cracking down on the widespread use of ingredients that may be harmful to public health,” EWG said in a statement today. 

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News Release
Tuesday, December 3, 2013

How did I spend my summer?  I hung around department store makeup aisles, looking for the much talked about “miracle” makeup, BB and CC creams. You should have seen the looks I got as I dabbed the testers on my arm – mind you, I’m a 40-year-old man wearing cargo shorts and a ratty T-shirt.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, December 3, 2013

 A new analysis by Environmental Working Group of 100 BB (beauty balm) and CC (color corrector or complexion corrector) creams concludes that they may expose users to fewer toxic chemicals than the moisturizer, foundation and sunscreen they are designed to replace.

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News Release
Thursday, November 21, 2013

 

Gov. Jerry Brown’s decision to revise regulations that led manufacturers to add large amounts of toxic fire retardants to foam furniture sold in California “is a public health victory for all Americans,” Environmental Working Group Research Director Renee Sharp said today.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep App is here!  EWG’s popular online consumer guide to more than 78,000 personal care products is now available as an App for the iPhone and Android.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 19, 2013

I am a millennial – one of the roughly 50 million Americans born after 1980 and coming of age in the 21st Century.  Generational theorists have called me lazy, narcissistic and entitled.  But they’ve also called me tech-savvy, politically active and entrepreneurial. A survey by the Nonprofit Technology Network reports that millennials are especially keen on non-profit engagement and hungry to get involved.

Which brings us to EWG:  40 percent of EWG staff belongs to the millennial generation, a diverse group of lobbyists, researchers and analysts that have been giving you the straight facts for 20 years. Why should millennials get involved with EWG?  Let me tell you the reasons I, as politically active young woman, want to stay connected with EWG.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, November 15, 2013

he Environmental Working Group has submitted Freedom of Information Act requests to the White House to learn whether industry improperly influenced the government’s decision to drop two proposals to strengthen public health protections from toxic chemicals. The Environmental Protection Agency withdrew the proposals in September after they had been bottled up at the White House Office of Management and Budget for more than a year.

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News Release
Thursday, November 14, 2013

A hearing at the House Energy and Commerce environment subcommittee yesterday surfaced deep doubts about a chemical industry-backed bill introduced earlier this year in the Senate to update the nation’s chemicals safety law.

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News Release
Thursday, November 14, 2013

Keeping politicians on message can sometimes be difficult. That also holds true of corporate chiefs and movie stars. Even the most seasoned, media-savvy folks veer off their talking points on occasion. But that’s not the case with the pesticide industry and its clientele.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 13, 2013

A landmark study led by Courtney Carignan of the Dartmouth Center for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research has found that the blood of 11 female collegiate gymnasts ages 18 to 22 contained a potentially hazardous flame retardant known as PentaBDE in average concentrations 4 to 6.5 times higher than average for Americans.The research team attributed the gymnasts’ extraordinary levels of PentaBDE to constant exposure to gym pads made of polyurethane foam treated with fire retardants.  Foam padding and furniture have been routinely infused with toxic fire retardants in large part because of outdated fire safety standards that have encouraged manufacturers to rely on chemicals instead of non-chemical ways to make foam products less flammable.  

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The Chemical Safety Improvement Act proposed in the Senate “fails to protect public health and the environment and allows chemical companies to keep conducting business as usual, which is the reason all Americans, including babies in the womb, are polluted with hundreds of toxic chemicals,” said Jason Rano, Environmental Working Group’s Director of Government Affairs.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Today (Nov. 13) in Seattle, HBO will screen a disturbing new documentary, The Toxic Hot Seat, that highlights the growing risk to firefighters – and the general public – of fire retardant chemicals that have long been added to furniture and other consumer products as a result of deceptive chemical industry lobbying.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 29, 2013

People will go to great lengths to be “beautiful,” and cosmetics companies know it.   It was not until 1938 that Congress passed the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, which gave the FDA power to act against dangerous cosmetics through the Department of Justice and federal court system. But the agency’s ability to address unsavory beauty products was limited.  In 2004, EWG launched the Skin Deep cosmetics database, an online resource where EWG scientists have researched ingredients in popular cosmetics and personal care products.  It aimed to fill in where industry and government left off. Today, Skin Deep lists more than 78,000 items.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 29, 2013

In the United States, the framework for safeguarding people and the environment against the dangers of toxic chemicals comprises three mutually reinforcing legal systems: federal regulation, state and federal civil justice systems, and state regulation.  Each part of the framework however, has been substantially weakened — the civil justice systems by years of tort "reform," and federal and state regulatory systems by outdated laws and an ongoing campaign by industry and its allies against protective regulation. 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, October 28, 2013

There is no end to the tricks that endocrine disruptors can play on our bodies: increasing production of certain hormones; decreasing production of others; imitating hormones; turning one hormone into another; interfering with hormone signaling; telling cells to die prematurely; competing with essential nutrients; binding to essential hormones; accumulating in organs that produce hormones.  Here are 12 of the worst hormone disrupters, how they do their dirty deeds, and some tips on how to avoid them.

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, October 28, 2013

EWG and the Keep A Breast Foundation today released a guide to educate consumers about some of the most problematic hormone-altering chemicals that people are routinely exposed to. EWG parntered with KAB to develop the Dirty Dozen list of endocrine disruptors to highlight the prevalence of these toxic chemicals, how they affect our health and simple ways to avoid them.

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News Release
Friday, October 11, 2013

In 2013, California proposed a maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L) for hexavalent chromium. EWG, in conjunction with the Natural Resources Defense Council, Clean Water Action and others, submitted comments to the California Department of Public Health strongly opposing the proposed standard and urging the Department to move to a health protective standard.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, October 11, 2013

The State of California’s proposed drinking water standard for hexavalent chromium, or chromium-6, could leave roughly 24 million residents, or more than 60 percent of the state’s population, unprotected from the known carcinogen, according to a review of the proposal by Environmental Working Group, Clean Water Action, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Center for Public Environmental Oversight and Integrated Resource Management.

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News Release
Thursday, October 10, 2013

At EWG, we know how much you care about the safety of personal care products.  Over the next several weeks we will delve deeper into some of the crucial issues  surrounding these products. EWG's investigative series, "Exposing the Cosmetics Cover-Up," will take on a wide range of topics that should be on the minds of everyone who uses a personal care product.  As  EWG has long known — and as leading medical specialists recently underscored -- many cosmetics and personal care products contain potentially toxic ingredients. Major cosmetics companies have not publicly committed themselves  to removing harmful ingredients.  We'll  look at  deceptive claims made by some popular anti-aging products. And we'll help you sort out cosmetics safety facts from myths.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides

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