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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Friday, May 16, 2014

Environmental Working Group President Ken Cook will be the featured guest and honoree today (May 16) at the annual Greening Our Children event hosted by the Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC), part of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

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News Release
Thursday, May 15, 2014

Last month, the EPA official responsible for reviewing the safety of chemicals used in thousands of every-day products was asked how many chemicals in use are so dangerous they should get a harder look by the agency to protect public health and the environment.

The answer?

1,000.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, May 5, 2014

Environmental Working Group Executive Director Heather White said today that the Coca-Cola Company has made a responsible decision to stop using brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, as an ingredient in Powerade, its line of sports drinks.  

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News Release
Monday, May 5, 2014

A revised draft of legislation to update the failed federal law that regulates toxic chemicals, which was released by Republican Rep. John Shimkus of Illinois following stiff criticism of his initial proposal, makes only cosmetic changes to his first draft. 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 28, 2014

The Chemicals in Commerce Act discussion draft circulated in the House of Representatives earlier this year claims to advance the public interest.  We don’t think so.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 28, 2014

The corn shoppers find on supermarket aisles and at farm stands is called “sweet corn” because it contains more sugar than its ancestor, field corn.  People eat sweet corn fresh on or off the cob, frozen or canned.  

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 28, 2014

Bananas are Americans' favorite fruit. The average American eats 10 pounds of the sweet yellow fruit yearly, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA 2012a). In 2012, the U.S. imported 9,589 million pounds of bananas, more than 95 percent of them grown in five tropical Latin American nations (USDA 2013).

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, April 24, 2014

Those pyramids of apples in the produce section of supermarkets year-round may look fresh, but sometimes they’re not. Apples are harvested once a year, in the autumn.  Growers apply a mixture of chemicals and a waxy coating to apples to protect the fruit during cold storage, which can last as long as a year.  

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Consumer advocate Erin Brockovich, dozens of military veterans, and watchdog groups rallied today to voice frustration over the federal government’s support of a known polluter in a landmark U.S. Supreme Court case.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The study of foam from 20 old and new crib mattresses found that mattresses release up to 30 different types of volatile organic compounds, also known as VOCs, among them, phenol, a strong skin and respiratory irritant.  The study detected other chemicals, including linalool and limonene, known fragrance allergens that can cause skin allergies. Repeated exposure over time increases the chances of an allergic reaction.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

SAN FRANCISCO – The California Department of Public Health today announced its final drinking water standard for the toxic chemical hexavalent chromium made infamous in the film Erin Brockovich. The state’s new Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 parts per billion is 500 times greater than the level identified as safe by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

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News Release
Thursday, April 3, 2014

Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.) recently authored the Chemicals in Commerce Act, a discussion draft of legislation purporting to reform our nation’s weak and outdated chemicals management law, the Toxic Substances Control Act.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, March 31, 2014

Should chemicals we encounter every day be safe?

You’d think the answer would be an obvious and resounding “yes.” But if you ask chemical companies – or some lawmakers – they say that “safe” is relative. In their view, chemical companies should be able to use dangerous chemicals if restricting their use to protect people would be too costly. 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 19, 2014

When 300,000 West Virginians went without water for three weeks earlier this year, most Americans were shocked to learn that health officials and the government didn’t know much about the licorice-smelling chemical that had leaked from a storage facility into the Elk River near Charleston. Hundreds of residents contacted the state’s Poison Control Center to report nausea, vomiting and rashes. Weeks after officials lifted the water ban, complaints of the licorice odor continue and the long-term health effects of the coal-processing substance – 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (Crude MCHM) – are still unknown.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Toxic substances in drinking water, food, food packaging and personal care products, as well as exposure to the sun’s harmful UV rays, have all been linked to serious health problems that affect many American men. Now a new guide from Environmental Working Group offers simple steps that men can take to reduce the risks.

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News Release
Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Most men know by now that good lifestyle choices – such as exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet, not smoking and drinking in moderation – make a big difference in staying healthy. Men may too often ignore these sensible recommendations, but it’s not because they’re not aware of them.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, March 14, 2014

In June of 2003, Linda Reinstein found out that her husband Alan had a type of lung cancer called mesothelioma, caused by breathing asbestos. “I can treat it,” the surgeon told her, “but I can’t cure it.” 

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, March 13, 2014

The state of California has launched an important initiative to protect its residents from exposures to toxic substances by calling on industry to find safer alternatives for three widely used chemicals, Environmental Working Group said today in a statement.

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News Release
Friday, March 7, 2014

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a voluntary "repellency awareness graphic” that would be displayed on bug repellents. It represents a small step forward but falls short of providing the full measure of information that consumers need to make informed decisions about products that provide the greatest benefit while minimizing the risks of exposure to toxic chemicals. After more than a year of research on bug repellents, EWG concluded that the lack of consistent efficacy testing and labeling of skin-applied repellents unnecessarily put consumers at risk from diseases borne by mosquitoes and ticks. According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5,650 American were infected with West Nile virus in 2012 and 286 of them died. Confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease rose to more than 30,000 in 2012, but the CDC has estimated that the true number of newly-diagnosed cases is probably 10 times greater. Currently, there is no convenient way for consumers to compare the general efficacy of different repellents. The efficacy testing of various products against tick species is inconsistent. Consumers have no easy way to evaluate the efficacy of botanical pesticide products, technically called minimum-risk pesticides.

Read EWG's Comments to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (PDF).

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, March 6, 2014

Renee Sharp, research director at the Environmental Working Group said today that the cosmetics industry’s legislative proposal to reform cosmetics law would deprive the federal Food and Drug Administration of the power to keep hazardous substances out of personal care products.

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News Release

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