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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Three U.S. government agencies have teamed up to investigate the safety of widely used crumb rubber surfaces on playgrounds and playing fields. To date, safety studies of crumb rubber – tiny “crumbs” of old tires that stabilize and cushion artificial turf – have been limited and inconclusive. Now the Environmental Protection Agency, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Consumer Product Safety Commission have agreed on a research action plan to begin filling the gaps in knowledge about how crumb rubber affects children and athletes who play on these surfaces.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, February 19, 2016

Some members of the Senate are trying to lure their colleagues to the dark side by cosponsoring a version of what critics call the DARK – Deny Americans the Right to Know – Act.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 18, 2016

The Food and Drug Administration plans to start testing food for traces of glyphosate, the world’s most commonly used pesticide. I know what you’re thinking: the federal government wasn’t doing that already?!

 

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 18, 2016

In 1971 Ford Motor Company decided that $1.25 per car was too much to spend on safer alternatives to asbestos brakes. Thirty years later, in the face of mounting lawsuits, Ford began spending millions for questionable studies trying to show that brake mechanics exposed to asbestos are not at increased risk of cancer.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, February 18, 2016

Throughout most of the 20th Century, American cities and homeowners installed lead pipes and solder in their tap water delivery systems – creating a toxic legacy for all of us. And the problem isn’t likely to change soon. No matter where you live, you can use simple techniques to discover whether your tap water is polluted with lead.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, February 18, 2016

The Environmental Protection Agency is falling short in its duty to protect Americans from the dangers of glyphosate, the most widely used weed killer in agriculture, according to a scientific review published online yesterday (Feb. 17) in the journal Environmental Health. The agency’s estimates of safe levels of exposure are based on outdated science, and its scientists are not sufficiently monitoring how much glyphosate is getting into food and people.
 

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, February 17, 2016

As a cancer epidemiologist, I’ve spent a lot of time researching the links between environmental contaminants and cancer. One of the pitfalls of the Digital Age is that people come across a lot of information that isn’t based on sound scientific evidence or is, at best, anecdotal. That’s dangerous, because conjecture and falsehoods that masquerade as fact can hamper efforts to prevent and treat cancer.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, February 8, 2016

Megan Schwarzman, an environmental health researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, has come up with a novel approach to screening synthetic chemicals and pollutants for their potential to cause breast cancer.  Her new method focuses on identifying chemicals that cause biological changes that scientists have associated with the development of breast cancer.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, February 4, 2016

Today is World Cancer Day, a perfect time to raise awareness and spur action in the fight against cancer. It’s a day to reflect on a very important question: What is the main cause of cancer? Is it driven by avoidable lifestyle and environmental factors or is it largely due to chance?

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Elephants are less likely to get cancer than humans, even though they have many more cells.  Why?  Teams of scientists from the University of Utah and the University of Chicago have separately concluded that the answer may primarily center around a critical cancer-defense gene called TP53, which detects cells with damaged DNA and either repairs or kills them off. Both elephants and humans have this gene, but elephants have many more copies in their genetic make-up.  It’s highly significant that two research teams arrived independently at the same result: in science, replication and independent verification are crucial to validating findings. Read more about the elephant research… 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Americans are more likely than Europeans to be exposed to Monsanto’s glyphosate weed killer. That’s in large part because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s calculations to determine allowable levels of glyphosate use are much more lax than the European Union’s.

 

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, February 2, 2016

In the coming months, congressional negotiators will try to reconcile two bills aimed at fixing the nation's broken and outdated chemical safety law, the Toxic Substances Control Act. As we’ve made lear time, time and time again, neither bill will fix what ails TSCA – a law so broken that the Environmental Protection Agency has only been able to regulate five chemicals since 1976.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, February 2, 2016

More than 3.5 billion pounds of glyphosate herbicide have been sprayed in the U.S. since it first hit the market as Monsanto’s “Roundup” in 1974, according to a paper published today by agricultural economist Charles Benbrook in the open-access journal Environmental Sciences Europe.

 

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, January 15, 2016

Your child has developed a red, itchy, or sore rash. Your little one may have a case of contact dermatitis, an eczema-like skin condition caused by touching something that triggers an allergic reaction or irritates the skin. If the reaction is serious, talk to your doctor about a referral for allergy testing to determine the source. But for minor reactions, some easy sleuthing at home can help you figure out if a common allergen is to blame.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, January 14, 2016

Perfluorinated compounds, or PFCs – the class of chemicals used in DuPont’s Teflon, 3M’s Scotchgard and many other products – pollute the bodies of people and animals in every corner of the world. In the latest findings, Canadian scientists have detected PFCs in virtually all of the eggs of herring gulls sampled in the Great Lakes region.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 11, 2016

The Montgomery County, Maryland, Council has passed an ordinance banning what it calls “cosmetic pesticides” on private lawns.  The devil, however, is in the details.  The term “cosmetic” means “unnecessary.”  Who decides what weed-killers are really “unnecessary?”

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 11, 2016

The EWG staff voted the landmark global climate accord approved on December 12 in Paris as the top environmental story of 2015. In our judgment, the achievement of the Paris pact is that, for the first time, representatives of 196 nations – large and small, rich and poor, heavily industrial and rural – agreed in principle that they must reduce carbon emissions and that they will report on their progress every five years.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 4, 2016

Under pressure from EWG and other environmental and health groups, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is banning three grease-resistant chemical substances linked to cancer and birth defects from use in pizza boxes, microwave popcorn bags, sandwich wrappers and other food packaging. The FDA’s belated action comes more than a decade after EWG and other advocates sounded alarms and five years after U.S. chemical companies stopped making the chemicals. It does nothing to prevent food processors and packagers from using almost 100 related chemicals that may also be hazardous.

 

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News Release
Monday, December 21, 2015

Consumers rightly expect that the chemicals used in everyday products are safe. Under current law, however, few are ever reviewed for safety.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, December 18, 2015

If Frank Lautenberg, Jim Jeffords, Barbara Boxer and Henry Waxman had summoned support for this version of toxic chemical reform 10 years ago, only the chemical industry would have rallied to their call. No wonder the parties most excited about the toxic chemicals “reform” bill the Senate passed yesterday are the very companies it purports to regulate and their closest allies in Congress, most notably Sen. David Vitter (R-La). In a sense, the chemical industry should be celebrating – this legislation originated with its lobbyists.

 

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News Release

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