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Triclosan

Consumer products containing this antibacterial pesticide don’t protect you from germs or disease, but they do expose you to a hormone-disrupting chemical. EWG shows how to avoid it.

Monday, June 16, 2014

Triclosan-containing antibacterial soaps neither safe nor effective:

Comments from Environmental Working Group on the Food and Drug Administration proposed data requirements for antibacterial soaps

June 16, 2014

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Washington, D.C.  – The decision by Avon, one of the world’s largest beauty product manufacturers, to remove the antibacterial chemical triclosan from its products is “the latest example of how consumer pressure can improve product safety and change the marketplace,” Environmental Working Group said in a statement today. 

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News Release
Sunday, December 22, 2013

The federal Food and Drug administration has announced proposed rules that could drive unnecessary and potentially dangerous products from the market -- antibacterial hand soaps like those marketed by Dial, Softsoap and CVS.

This is a big deal.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Washington, D.C. ­ The Food and Drug Administration's proposal to require manufacturers to prove antibacterial hand soaps are safe and better than plain soap and water is a sign that the agency is finally “cracking down on the widespread use of ingredients that may be harmful to public health,” EWG said in a statement today. 

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Key Issues:
News Release
Friday, September 13, 2013

Yesterday marked a major victory for American consumers as mega-retailer Walmart announced a Sustainable Chemistry initiative that takes an important step toward protecting the health and wellness its customers.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, April 8, 2011

 

EWG urges EPA to work with FDA to ban all non-medical uses of triclosan, an antibacterial additive and potent hormone disruptor. In a letter to EPA's pesticide division EWG outlines new evidence that the chemical poses an unacceptable health risk to the American public.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, May 24, 2010

 

EWG comments that FDA’s assessment of triclosan in over-the-counter antimicrobial products should weigh evidence suggesting that antibacterial hand soaps and dish detergents are no more effective than plain soap yet present significant safety concerns for people and the environment.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, April 8, 2009
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, December 22, 2008

This fall, EPA approved re-registration of antibacterial soap ingredient triclosan for yet another five years of use in consumer products, potentially leaving human and environmental health at great risk.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Sunday, October 12, 2008

It’s nearly ubiquitous in liquid hand soap and dishwashing detergent, but those aren’t the only products it’s in. Triclosan is also a common ingredient in toothpaste, facewash, deodorant, a host of personal care products, and even mattresses, toothbrushes and shoe insoles. A U.S. FDA advisory committee has found that household use of antibacterial products provides no benefits over plain soap and water, and the American Medical Association recommends that triclosan not be used in the home, as it may encourage bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Laboratory tests reveal adolescent girls across America are contaminated with chemicals commonly used in cosmetics and body care products. Environmental Working Group (EWG) detected 16 chemicals from 4 chemical families - phthalates, triclosan, parabens, and musks - in blood and urine samples from 20 teen girls aged 14-19. 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, September 18, 2008

Teenage girls across America are contaminated with hormone-altering chemicals found in cosmetics and body care products, confirms a new study released today by EWG.

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News Release
Friday, July 25, 2008

It might be in your toothbrush. Your socks. Your child's rattle. Then again - it might not be. But do you know for sure?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 17, 2008

With no assessment of health risks to infants, federal regulators have approved a hormone-disrupting pesticide, triclosan, for use in 140 different types of consumer products including liquid hand soap, toothpaste, undergarments and children's

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Triclosan is an antibacterial chemical found in many products. Use EWG's Triclosan to identify and avoid this toxic chemical in dish soap, personal care and other antibacterial products.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Although most shoppers probably don't know it, "antibacterial" isn't just for soap anymore. From sports clothing to cutting boards, deodorants, and children's toys, a wide range of consumer products are now commonly treated with antimicrobial pesticides such as triclosan.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 12, 2007

EWG and East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) researchers analyzed samples of wastewater from residential, commercial, and industrial sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. 18 of 19 wastewater samples examined contained at least 1 of 3 unregulated, widely-used hormone disruptors – phthalates, bisphenol A, and triclosan; 2 samples contained all 3 substances. Despite sophisticated wastewater treatment, these chemicals were detected in treated waters discharged into the Bay.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 19, 2005

An FDA panel is examining possible health concerns associated with antibacterial soaps, wipes and other household products. The market is booming for these germ-killers, but home use might be creating strains resistant to both antibacterials and antibiotics. This is of particular concern to families with children, as it presents the double-edged sword of exposing children to surviving super-germs, or, on the other hand, overprotecting them in a squeaky-clean environment that prevents them from building immunity, which can lead to asthma or allergies later in life.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
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