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Phthalates

These endocrine-disrupting “plasticizer” chemicals are everywhere in modern society. EWG helped get several of them banned in children’s toys, but they are still widely used chemicals that  pollute almost everyone’s bodies.

Wednesday, February 20, 2008
Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, February 4, 2008

EWG's response to a study appearing today in the journal Pediatrics showing for the first time that infants are exposed to potent reproductive toxins called phthalates from everyday baby products, including shampoo, lotion, and powder.

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News Release
Tuesday, December 18, 2007

 

 

To the National Research Council
Committee on the Health Risks of Phthalates

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December 18, 2007

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Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, July 12, 2007

EWG and East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) researchers analyzed samples of wastewater from residential, commercial, and industrial sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. 18 of 19 wastewater samples examined contained at least 1 of 3 unregulated, widely-used hormone disruptors – phthalates, bisphenol A, and triclosan; 2 samples contained all 3 substances. Despite sophisticated wastewater treatment, these chemicals were detected in treated waters discharged into the Bay.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, May 31, 2007

Question: I'm concerned about my 8-month-old daughter coming into contact with phthalates. Should I throw out any plastic toys, or are there some companies that don't use phthalates? Toy companies I've contacted have told me phthalates are harmless. Is this true?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, February 12, 2007

A major loophole in federal law allows fragrance manufacturers to hide potentially hazardous chemicals in product scents, including substances linked to allergies, birth defects, and even cancer. Because they won't tell you what's in the scents they sell you, we combed through thousands of Valentine's Day gift ideas to bring you products that not only smell great, but that are also free of hidden, potentially hazardous fragrances.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, October 27, 2006

Industry and trade groups are suing to overturn San Francisco's newest ordinance aimed at protecting the city's toddlers from a suite of chemicals shown to cause cancer and hormone disruption in laboratory trials. The ban prohibits the sale and manufacture of toys and products intended for children under the age of 3, if they contain phthalates compounds used to soften plastics containing PVC and Bisphenol A.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 13, 2006

In a new study published in Environmental Science & Technology, researchers watched levels of plasticizing chemicals called phthalates ("THAH-lates") rise and fall in breast milk over a six-month period.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 24, 2006

The body burden ball just keeps getting bigger, this time with test results from 10 Washington residents, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports. The Toxic-Free Legacy Coalition of Washington State tested for the usual suspects -- fire retardants, pesticides, mercury, lead and phthalates -- among others, and found five to seven of eight classes of chemicals in each participant.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 4, 2005

Environmental Health Perspectives examines the possible connection between a startlingly low male birth rate and industrial pollution among a population of Native Americans in Ontario living right next to one of Canada's largest concentrations of chemical plants. The area is heavily polluted with PCBs, phthalates and dioxins, all known endocrine disruptors.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, November 19, 2002

Most people are surprised to learn that the government neither conducts nor requires safety testing of chemicals that go into health and beauty products. Today a panel funded and advised by the cosmetic industry determined that cosmetic companies can continue to add reproductive toxins known as phthalates to cosmetics marketed to women of childbearing age.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, July 8, 2002

In May 2002 a coalition of environmental and public health organizations contracted with a major national laboratory to test 72 name-brand, off-the-shelf beauty products for the presence of phthalates, a large family of industrial chemicals linked to per- manent birth defects in the male reproductive system.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, November 1, 2000

In September 2000, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that every single one of the 289 persons tested for the plasticizer dibutyl phthalate (DBP) had the compound in their bodies. The finding passed with little public fanfare, but surprised government scientists, who just one month earlier had rated DBP of little health concern based on the scientific assumption, which later turned out to be wrong, that levels in humans were within safe limits. DBP causes a number of birth defects in lab animals, primarily to male offspring, including testicular atrophy, reduced sperm count, and defects in the structure of the penis (CERHR 2000).

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Reports & Consumer Guides

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