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Mercury

Mercury exposure from eating fish carries serious health risks, especially for developing fetuses. Read about EWG’s mercury research and learn how to avoid the dangers by using EWG’s Tuna Calculator.

Wednesday, September 28, 2005

The Washington Post's Juliet Eilperin reports on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study that shows that U.S. women living near a coast have higher levels than women living inland.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 20, 2005

As an update to last week's post on high mercury levels in supermarket tuna samples, the Eugene Register-Guard provides incentives for eating locally-caught fish: lower mercury, higher omega-3s and support for community businesses.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, September 16, 2005

AP reports that University of North Carolina tests in 21 states found average mercury levels in tuna and swordfish at 1.1 parts per million, over the government's limit of 1 ppm. The samples came from supermarket chains, including Safeway and Whole Foods, and some groups are pushing for supermarkets to include warning signs with their seafood displays.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, August 22, 2005

Two Utah state agencies have denied a request for an independent testing program of mercury levels in fish in the Great Salt Lake Basin. In February the U.S. Geological Survey announced that the lake has the highest concentration of toxic mercury ever found in the environment.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, August 8, 2005

David Kirby, a New York Times reporter and author of "Evidence of Harm", and Dr. Harvey Fineberg, president of the Institute of Medicine, discussed the possible link between the increase of mercury in vaccinations between 1988 and 1992, and the explosion of autism cases in the last 90s.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, April 1, 2005

In the wake of weak mercury pollution standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency last week, The Washington Post reported that the EPA failed to include findings from their own study showing stricter protections on mercury emissions benefit human health.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2005

The Bush Administration says it will allow coal-burning power plans and other mercury polluters to trade emissions allowances, rather than requiring each facility to meet stricter standards. The cap-and-trade policy allows facilities in mercury “hot spots” to continue emitting high amounts of mercury.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, March 14, 2005

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) today condemns the Bush EPA's proposed rule allowing power plants to trade mercury pollution credits.

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News Release
Sunday, March 13, 2005

EWG appeal requesting correction of FDA seafood advisory entitled "What you need to know about mercury in fish and shellfish: 2004 FDA and EPA advice for women who might become pregnant, women who are pregnant, nursing mothers, young children" (PD

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, March 11, 2005

The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office (GAO) took the EPA to task this week for using fuzzy math and ignoring health effects to bolster President Bush’s cap-and-trade proposal for mercury emissions from power plants, The Washington Post reports. The EPA skewed its analysis to indicate that the administration’s proposal would garner greater savings than enforcing pollution caps on all plants, the technology-based plan favored by conservationists.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, February 11, 2005

With the Bush administration dragging its heels on limiting mercury emissions from power plants, concerned New Hampshire citizens are calling for legislation independent of federal regulations, the New Hampshire Union Leader reports. A new bill in the state Senate requires an 80 percent reduction in mercury emissions in eight years, as well as a cap on carbon dioxide.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, December 23, 2004

The international mining giant, Denver-based Newmont Mining Corp., is under fire for dangerously polluting Indonesian communities in violation of US environmental standards. Now, an Environmental Working Group (EWG) search of US government electronic records it has posted on its web site (www.ewg.org/mining/) shows the company holds more acres of mining claims on Western public land than any other metal mining company. Newmont holds 347,458 acres of claims in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada and Washington.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, July 30, 2004

 

Pregnant Women, Potential Mothers and Kids are of Most Concern. The Wall Street Journal reported in July about the increasing popularity of tests designed to tell how much mercury has accumulated in the body.
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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, July 30, 2004

The American Medical Association (AMA), the national professional organization for all physicians in the United States, has adopted a resolution that includes the following recommendation: "Given the limitations of national consumer fish consumption advisories, the Food and Drug Administration should consider the advisability of requiring that fish consumption advisories and results related to mercury testing be posted where fish, including canned tuna, are sold."

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, March 26, 2004
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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, March 19, 2004

EWG's Timeline of the scientific understanding about mercury toxicity from the 1950s to 2004.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, March 1, 2004

Air pollution from coal burned in power plants is a major source of mercury in fish. If women follow the FDA's advice and eat one can of albacore tuna a week, hundreds of thousands more babies will be exposed to hazardous levels of mercury.

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News Release
Monday, December 22, 2003

December 22, 2003

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, December 11, 2003

EWG demonstrates that women complying with FDA's dietary guidelines for fish consumption during pregnancy will ingest unsafe amounts of mercury when they select fish with elevated mercury levels, like albacore tuna.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, December 9, 2003

Results of new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) fish tests show that mercury contamination of canned tuna and other fish is more serious than agency scientists previously assumed.

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News Release

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