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Mercury

Mercury exposure from eating fish carries serious health risks, especially for developing fetuses. Read about EWG’s mercury research and learn how to avoid the dangers by using EWG’s Tuna Calculator.

Wednesday, May 24, 2006

The body burden ball just keeps getting bigger, this time with test results from 10 Washington residents, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports. The Toxic-Free Legacy Coalition of Washington State tested for the usual suspects -- fire retardants, pesticides, mercury, lead and phthalates -- among others, and found five to seven of eight classes of chemicals in each participant.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 16, 2006

A California Superior Court judge has overturned a ruling requiring tuna companies to brand their cans with mercury warning labels under the state's Prop 65 legislation.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 8, 2006

The House votes today on a bill pitting giant food companies against the health and safety of American families—a measure that could nullify state laws warning consumers about mercury in fish, lead in candy, arsenic in bottled water, benzene in soft drinks and dozens of other dangers.

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News Release
Friday, March 3, 2006

No point rewriting Marian Burros' lead from Wednesday's New York Times: "The House is expected to vote Thursday on a bill that w

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, January 4, 2006

Apparently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) relies on the same sources of information as the general public to learn what's in popular foods: the newspaper.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, December 12, 2005

The Chicago Tribune is running a powerful series this week on mercury in seafood, including test results for eight different kinds of fish purchased in Chicago-area fish markets and supermarkets.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 2, 2005

In the next logical step after some grocery chains voluntarily putting mercury warnings at their seafood counters, one company is now marketing low-mercury fish to consumers worried about its neurotoxic effects on infants and children.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, October 20, 2005

Safeway and Albertsons grocery chains have new additions to the seafood counter signs warning consumers of health concerns associated with consuming fish with high levels of mercury. The signs are voluntary, but mention primarily swordfish, tilefish, king mackerel and shark, largely ignoring tuna.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 4, 2005

San Francisco officials are looking at a proposal requiring trilingual signs in restaurants, stores and markets warning consumers of mercury in their fish. Mercury can cause neurological and developmental problems, with pregnant mothers, infants and children most at risk.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, September 30, 2005

Just before hunting season opens in Utah, state officials are warning hunters not to eat two types of ducks that feed on Great Salt Lake marhes because tests on the animals show dangerous levels of mercury in their flesh.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 28, 2005

The Washington Post's Juliet Eilperin reports on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study that shows that U.S. women living near a coast have higher levels than women living inland.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 20, 2005

As an update to last week's post on high mercury levels in supermarket tuna samples, the Eugene Register-Guard provides incentives for eating locally-caught fish: lower mercury, higher omega-3s and support for community businesses.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, September 16, 2005

AP reports that University of North Carolina tests in 21 states found average mercury levels in tuna and swordfish at 1.1 parts per million, over the government's limit of 1 ppm. The samples came from supermarket chains, including Safeway and Whole Foods, and some groups are pushing for supermarkets to include warning signs with their seafood displays.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, August 22, 2005

Two Utah state agencies have denied a request for an independent testing program of mercury levels in fish in the Great Salt Lake Basin. In February the U.S. Geological Survey announced that the lake has the highest concentration of toxic mercury ever found in the environment.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, August 8, 2005

David Kirby, a New York Times reporter and author of "Evidence of Harm", and Dr. Harvey Fineberg, president of the Institute of Medicine, discussed the possible link between the increase of mercury in vaccinations between 1988 and 1992, and the explosion of autism cases in the last 90s.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, April 1, 2005

In the wake of weak mercury pollution standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency last week, The Washington Post reported that the EPA failed to include findings from their own study showing stricter protections on mercury emissions benefit human health.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2005

The Bush Administration says it will allow coal-burning power plans and other mercury polluters to trade emissions allowances, rather than requiring each facility to meet stricter standards. The cap-and-trade policy allows facilities in mercury “hot spots” to continue emitting high amounts of mercury.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, March 14, 2005

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) today condemns the Bush EPA's proposed rule allowing power plants to trade mercury pollution credits.

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News Release
Sunday, March 13, 2005

EWG appeal requesting correction of FDA seafood advisory entitled "What you need to know about mercury in fish and shellfish: 2004 FDA and EPA advice for women who might become pregnant, women who are pregnant, nursing mothers, young children" (PD

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, March 11, 2005

The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office (GAO) took the EPA to task this week for using fuzzy math and ignoring health effects to bolster President Bush’s cap-and-trade proposal for mercury emissions from power plants, The Washington Post reports. The EPA skewed its analysis to indicate that the administration’s proposal would garner greater savings than enforcing pollution caps on all plants, the technology-based plan favored by conservationists.

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EnviroBlog
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