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Mercury

Mercury exposure from eating fish carries serious health risks, especially for developing fetuses. Read about EWG’s mercury research and learn how to avoid the dangers by using EWG’s Tuna Calculator.

Friday, March 18, 2016

After a year of trying to conceive a child, several months of infertility treatment and finally a miscarriage, I felt completely out of control over my own body. I learned about EWG and began researching what chemicals I was being exposed to and how I could limit my exposure.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Pregnant women who follow the federal government's draft dietary advice could eat too much fish high in toxic mercury, which is harmful to the developing brains of fetuses, babies and young children, according to a new EWG study of women nationwide. At the same time, they could fail to get enough of the omega-3 fatty acids essential to their babies’ healthy development.
 

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News Release
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Federal agencies advise women who are pregnant, nursing or planning to become pregnant to eat 8-to-12 ounces a week of low-mercury seafood.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

In 2014, federal agencies issued draft recommendations that women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or might become pregnant and young children eat more fish that is lower in mercury. Their advice is based on the fact that seafood consumption is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Seafood is good source of lean protein and healthy omega-3 fatty acids. But some types of fish contain high levels of mercury, a heavy metal that’s harmful to human health when consumed in large amounts.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, June 22, 2015

Health, environmental justice and consumer watchdog groups are joining independent research scientists to warn policymakers about the serious, if unintended, health risks posed by misguided government advice that could encourage pregnant women to eat unsafe amounts of mercury-laden tuna.

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News Release
Monday, February 23, 2015

Environmental Working Group and Mercury Policy Project strongly disagree with a federal scientific panel’s recommendation, made public last week, that federal agencies stop warning pregnant women to limit their consumption of high-mercury albacore tuna.

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News Release
Monday, November 3, 2014

EWG and 18,444 EWG supporters ask the Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee to improve new draft advice on seafood consumption during pregnancy and childhood. 

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, September 18, 2014

The Environmental Working Group published a new shopping tool and seafood calculator today to help people buy seafood lower in mercury, higher in omega-3 fatty acids and sustainably produced.

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News Release
Thursday, August 21, 2014

Which fish are richest in healthy omega-3 fatty acids, lowest in mercury contamination and sustainably produced?

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Earlier this month the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released updated consumer guidelines on fish consumption. The two agencies said that because of the important developmental and health benefits, pregnant and breastfeeding women, those who might become pregnant and young children should eat 8-to-12 ounces (2-3 servings) a week of fish varieties that have lower levels of mercury contamination. 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, June 25, 2014

A federal advisory encouraging pregnant women, nursing mothers and children to eat more seafood fails to protect them from methylmercury exposure and guide them to better fish choices, according to a new analysis released today by Environmental Working Group and the Mercury Policy Project.

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News Release
Tuesday, June 10, 2014

New seafood consumption guidelines announced today by the federal Food and Drug Administration could put at risk the health of young children and pregnant and nursing women, according to Environmental Working Group senior analyst Sonya Lunder.

 

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News Release
Tuesday, January 21, 2014

People who follow the Obama administration’s guidelines on eating seafood could consume dangerous amounts of mercury, a potent neurotoxin, or too few essential omega-3 fatty acids, according to a new EWG analysis of fish contaminant and nutrient data.

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News Release
Tuesday, January 21, 2014

People who follow the federal government’s guidelines on seafood consumption are likely to consume too much mercury, a dangerous neurotoxin, or too few beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, according to a new EWG analysis of fish contaminant and nutrient data.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, October 28, 2013

EWG and the Keep A Breast Foundation today released a guide to educate consumers about some of the most problematic hormone-altering chemicals that people are routinely exposed to. EWG parntered with KAB to develop the Dirty Dozen list of endocrine disruptors to highlight the prevalence of these toxic chemicals, how they affect our health and simple ways to avoid them.

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News Release
Thursday, March 29, 2012

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported today that 1 in 88 American children have an autism spectrum disorder, a 23 percent increase since the agency’s 2009 review.

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News Release
Friday, March 9, 2012

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned this week that more than 35 imported skin creams, antiseptic soaps and anti-aging lotions have recently been tied to mercury poisoning that in some instances sent users to the hospital.  

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, February 27, 2012

Three common environmental chemicals - lead, organophosphate pesticides and methyl mercury - may have effects on children's IQ in the overall population.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, December 21, 2011

The federal Environmental Protection Agency pressed ahead today in its effort to reduce Americans’ exposure to hazardous chemicals, announcing a long-awaited new standard to reduce the amount of mercury emissions allowed from power plants in the U.S.

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News Release

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