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The Issue

Lead

Chronic exposure to lead is a well-known threat to health, especially for children, but it’s still a persistent problem. EWG’s research continues to track and uncover lead’s hazards.

Highlights

Progress: Less lead allowed in water pipes Read More
New study links low-level lead exposures to kidney damage in kids Read More

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The Latest on Lead

Thursday, March 22, 2007

Question: There's an internet rumor that says you can check for lead in lipstick by rubbing a gold ring on the lipstick. If the lipstick turns black, it contains lead. Is there any truth to this?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, January 24, 2007

A new report by ConsumerLab.com finds only 10 of 21 products tested meet the claims on their labels. Several of the multivitamin products tested contained high levels of lead, including one women's multivitamin that contained 15.3 micrograms of lead per daily dose--more than 10 times the amount of lead allowed without a warning label in the state of California.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Marla Cone of the Los Angeles Times has writtten a brilliant (albeit disturbing) article on the many products for sale in the US which have been banned in most other countries as toxic. The piece leads with an example of formaldehyde-laden plywood, sold throughout the US, but illegal even in China, where it is manufactured.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, August 21, 2006

"The Clinton administration in 2000 set a goal to eliminate childhood lead poisoning by 2010. To achieve that, in the next two years the EPA would have to reduce the estimated cases to 90,000 from about 400,000 cases in 1999-2000." [Kansas City Star]

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, August 15, 2006

A survey this month by Baltimore City Health Commisioner, Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, found that 4 out of 17 samples of children's jewelry sold at area stores had dangerously high levels of lead.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 24, 2006

The body burden ball just keeps getting bigger, this time with test results from 10 Washington residents, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports. The Toxic-Free Legacy Coalition of Washington State tested for the usual suspects -- fire retardants, pesticides, mercury, lead and phthalates -- among others, and found five to seven of eight classes of chemicals in each participant.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 8, 2006

The House votes today on a bill pitting giant food companies against the health and safety of American families—a measure that could nullify state laws warning consumers about mercury in fish, lead in candy, arsenic in bottled water, benzene in soft drinks and dozens of other dangers.

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News Release
Thursday, February 23, 2006

The Associated Press reported that Dr. Philip Landrigan of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine testified in a court case over lead paint that swallowing a chip of lead paint just half the size of his (Landrigan's) fingernail could send a child into a coma or convulsions.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, November 8, 2005

Lead acetate, an ingredient used in personal care products such as men's hair dye, has been banned in Canada over fears of cancer and reproductive toxicity. The chemical has been banned in Europe, and California considers it a carcinogen. Canadians' products must be free of the chemical by the end of 2006.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 14, 2005

An Oakland group found lead in 27 soft vinyl lunchboxes in a recent study, a quarter of the products tested. The lead was on the surface of the plastic, where it could easily leach onto children's hands or food.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 14, 2005

A benchmark investigation of industrial chemicals, pollutants and pesticides in umbilical cord blood

Environmental Working Group, July 14, 2005

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, May 17, 2005

An EPA whistle-blower has exposed the agency for secretly delaying completion of required rules to protect children and construction workers from lead poisoning from paint and dust in favor of voluntary compliance standards, the Los Angeles Times reports.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, December 23, 2004

The international mining giant, Denver-based Newmont Mining Corp., is under fire for dangerously polluting Indonesian communities in violation of US environmental standards. Now, an Environmental Working Group (EWG) search of US government electronic records it has posted on its web site (www.ewg.org/mining/) shows the company holds more acres of mining claims on Western public land than any other metal mining company. Newmont holds 347,458 acres of claims in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada and Washington.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Sunday, May 9, 2004

As a state law goes into effect requiring lead testing for all children in high-risk areas, a new investigation from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) estimates that 19,000 Ohio children are lead poisoned.

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News Release
Monday, May 3, 2004

An estimated 19,000 children under age six in Ohio have unsafe levels of lead in their blood, according to a new analysis by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) that identifies high-risk counties and neighborhoods across the state.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, May 2, 2001

“We fired round after round, match after match, without realizing what lead could do to us.”
—Joseph P. Tartaro, Second Amendment Foundation news release, January 10, 1998

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, May 2, 2001

Guns can be hazardous to your health even if you don't get shot with one, according to a new study of the harm to people and the environment from lead pollution at shooting ranges in California and nationwide.

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News Release
Tuesday, May 1, 2001

View and Download the report here: Poisonous Pastime

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, May 1, 2001

The Violence Policy Center (VPC) and EWG release Poisonous Pastime: The Health Risks of Shooting Ranges and Lead to Children, Families and the Environment. The study documents how shooting ranges poisoning children and polluting the environment with lead, yet remain almost entirely unregulated-exempt from even the Bush Administration's new lead pollution reporting rules.

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News Release
Monday, April 30, 2001

View and Download the report here: Lead Pollution At Outdoor Firing Ranges

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