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Lead

Chronic exposure to lead is a well-known threat to health, especially for children, but it’s still a persistent problem. EWG’s research continues to track and uncover lead’s hazards.

Monday, October 28, 2013

EWG and the Keep A Breast Foundation today released a guide to educate consumers about some of the most problematic hormone-altering chemicals that people are routinely exposed to. EWG parntered with KAB to develop the Dirty Dozen list of endocrine disruptors to highlight the prevalence of these toxic chemicals, how they affect our health and simple ways to avoid them.

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News Release
Monday, February 27, 2012

Three common environmental chemicals - lead, organophosphate pesticides and methyl mercury - may have effects on children's IQ in the overall population.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, February 8, 2012

U.S. Food and Drug Administration researchers have detected lead in 400 brands of lipstick tested by the agency. At least two popular brands had amounts of the neurotoxin above the threshold the state of California considers safe in personal care products, which is 5 parts per million.

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News Release
Monday, March 28, 2011

In 2007, two members of Congress traveling on a tax-funded junket scolded a Chinese government official over tainted Chinese-made products, including lead-tainted children's toys, being exported to the United States.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 10, 2011

On Jan. 4, President Obama signed into law theReduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act. The law will reduce the amount of lead allowed in faucets and plumbing fixtures to a tiny fraction of the old limit - from 8 percent to 0.25 percent.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, January 21, 2010

High-level lead exposure is a known risk for kidney disease. A new study sought to better understand the effects of low-level exposure, and found evidence that kids with blood lead levels as low as 2.9 micrograms showed signs of damaged, slower-functioning kidneys.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, November 23, 2009

Laboratory tests commissioned by EWG have detected as many as 232 toxic chemicals in cord blood samples collected from 10 minority newborns. Notably these tests show, for the first time, bisphenol A (BPA), a plastic component and synthetic estrogen, in umbilical cord blood of American infants.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 28, 2009

It's the Thursday before Halloween and my kids haven't quite decided what to be. Top runners at this point (it changes daily) are pretty standard: witch and princess.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, July 24, 2009

Back in August of 2007, I was trying to work on vacation. I was squirreled away in a back bedroom surrounded by files and books when I got a Google alert. Millions of toys were being recalled because of dangerously high levels of leads.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, June 25, 2009

I live in an old house (1911) and used to work in affordable housing, so the dangers of lead paint aren't new to me. And with toddlers around for years now, I know to avoid paint chips in the mouth and lead dust in the air. What I didn't connect - until recently - was that there might be lead in our soil, which is where we grow food.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, May 4, 2009

If you follow scientific news on autism, then you've probably noticed frequent reports of new discoveries of genes "linked" to the "disease."

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, April 9, 2009

Yesterday Janet Raloff of Science News wrote about a new study linking lead levels in older women to an increased risk of mortality. Women whose blood lead levels measure > 8 micrograms per deciliter were a whopping 60% more likely to die during the study. The main reason was heart disease and stroke. Since about 90% of accumulated lead is stored in our bones, elderly women are at increased risk because the loss of bone density releases lead into circulation in the bloodstream.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, February 11, 2009

The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, aimed at keeping lead and toxic plastic chemicals called phthalates out of children's toys, went into effect yesterday.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, February 2, 2009

 

When are traces of lead in drinking water dangerous? The better question is, when aren't they?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Researchers have found a shockingly high lead levels in the blood of young Washington, D.C. children tested between 2001 and 2004, when the District of Columbia's drinking water was being contaminated with lead from aging pipes.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, January 22, 2009

I suffer every spring in Washington DC because of the smell of the fake grass that surrounds my apartment building, my walk to work, my walk in the park, my walk pretty much anywhere.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, May 1, 2008

EWG's Renee Sharp testifies to the California state Senate about the need to remove BPA and lead from children's products.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, August 2, 2007

In what is only the nation's second largest toy recall this year, the Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued a recall of more than one million lead-painted toys.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 2, 2007

When University of California-San Francisco researchers and health affiliates investigated an outbreak of lead poisoning in Monterey County, California, they found a correlation between consumption of certain imported food products—particularly chapulines (dried grasshoppers) from Oaxaca, Mexico—and elevated blood lead levels in prenatal women and children.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, March 23, 2007

Did you know that many cosmetics have a shelf life of only one year, and the applicators of some products, like eyeliner, need to be washed or discarded even more frequently? According to the FDA, failing to do so can lead to bacterial infection.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post

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