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Fire Retardants

 

EWG’s tests showed that toxic fire retardant chemicals contaminate the bodies of children and mothers everywhere and helped bring about some policy reforms, but more needs to be done.

Monday, January 22, 2007

According to Seattle Post-Intelligencer, a man claiming to represent the Fallen Firefighters Foundation gave testimony against a PBDE bill. It was revealed that he worked for Ameribrom, a PBDE manufacturer. Shameless!

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 22, 2007

New research confirms that people can take up brominated flame retardants (PBDEs) from the dust in their homes.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, November 7, 2006

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology finds that exposure to carpeting and other materials in the workplace significantly increases adults' risk of developing asthma. Carpet contains over 100 known toxins including benzene, formaldehyde, and flame-retardants. Added features like stain resistance increase the number of toxins.
[ via : Reuters ]

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EnviroBlog
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Wednesday, May 24, 2006

The body burden ball just keeps getting bigger, this time with test results from 10 Washington residents, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports. The Toxic-Free Legacy Coalition of Washington State tested for the usual suspects -- fire retardants, pesticides, mercury, lead and phthalates -- among others, and found five to seven of eight classes of chemicals in each participant.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, March 7, 2006

If you're looking for couches with wood from sustainable forests, fabric free of flame retardants and finished off with non-toxic dyes, stains and glues, Q Collection makes them not just green, but also good-looking.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, August 19, 2005

A study recently published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology finds that up to 80% of a child's exposure to toxic flame retardant chemicals could come from household dust.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, February 17, 2005

New tests by Toronto's Globe and Mail and CTV News show some of the world's highest levels of chemical fire retardants in common Canadian foods.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, September 2, 2004

A new study finds chemical flame retardants known as PBDEs contaminate common foods available on supermarket shelves. The study appears in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology and provides possible evidence that food may be a primary source of the flame retardant contamination found in humans.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, August 17, 2004

A study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology shows that farmed salmon accumulates higher levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) a chemical flame retardant used in furniture and electrical equipment. Some types of flame retardants have been banned in Europe and California because of health concerns.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 12, 2004

In the first nationwide tests for brominated fire retardants in house dust, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found unexpectedly high levels of these neurotoxic chemicals in every home sampled. The average level of brominated fire retardants measured in dust from nine homes was more than 4,600 parts per billion (ppb). A tenth sample, collected in a home where products with fire retardants were recently removed, contained more than 41,000 ppb of brominated fire retardants — twice as high as the maximum level previously reported by any dust study worldwide.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, May 12, 2004

The phaseout of two widely used chemicals will not protect Americans from exposure to brominated fire retardants linked to brain and nerve damage, according to nationwide tests of house dust that found unexpectedly high levels of a third retardant that will remain on the market.

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News Release
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

In the first nationwide tests for chemical fire retardants in the breast milk of American women, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) found unexpectedly high levels of these little-known neurotoxic chemicals in every participant tested.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

In the first nationwide tests for chemical fire retardants in the breast milk of American mothers, Environmental Working Group (EWG) found unexpectedly high levels of these little-known thyroid toxins in every woman tested.

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News Release
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

In the first nationwide tests for chemical fire retardants in the breast milk of American mothers, Environmental Working Group (EWG) found unexpectedly high levels of these little-known thyroid toxins in every woman tested.

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News Release
Thursday, July 10, 2003

View and Download the report here: Tainted Catch

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Reports & Consumer Guides

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