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Fire Retardants

 

EWG’s tests showed that toxic fire retardant chemicals contaminate the bodies of children and mothers everywhere and helped bring about some policy reforms, but more needs to be done.

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Evidence of a chemical linked to cancer and hormone disruption was found in the urine of all babies tested for a new study from Duke University. The sources, researchers say, could be nursery gliders, car seats, bassinets and other baby products that might be treated with toxic fire retardants. The remains of a second chemical also linked to endocrine disruption were found in 93 percent of the infants tested.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Researchers found a fire-retardant chemical that could disrupt the hormone system in the urine of babies who were apparently exposed with baby products such as bassinets, car seats and nursery gliders, an alarming new study by Duke University reports. The chemical also can cause cancer.
 

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News Release
Monday, October 19, 2015

Researchers at Duke University and Environmental Working Group have found evidence of a suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical widely used in popular nail polishes in the bodies of more than two-dozen women who participated in a biomonitoring study. The study, published today in Environmental International, found that all women had a metabolite of triphenyl phosphate, or TPHP, in their bodies just 10 to 14 hours after painting their nails.

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News Release
Tuesday, October 13, 2015

More than 97 percent of Americans – including children and pregnant woman – have harmful fire retardant chemicals in their bodies, according to the most recent biomonitoring study by the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, June 19, 2015

Parents do a lot of research before they buy a car seat. They want to know, how does the seat perform in crash tests? What’s its safety record? How will it protect my child in case of collision?

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, June 17, 2015

With all of the chemicals that get put into consumer products, it can be difficult to protect our children from toxic hazards. Knowing what to look for and what kids’ products contain harmful chemicals is the first step.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, March 20, 2015

Do you know that your couch may be toxic to you and your kids? A weak federal chemical safety law and poorly designed state fire safety standards fail to protect Americans from thousands of dangerous chemicals like flame retardants.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 30, 2014

California scored a big win for human health and the environment today (Sept. 30) when Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill to require labeling on upholstered furniture to tell shoppers whether it contains toxic flame retardant chemicals. 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, September 15, 2014

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) announced Sunday (Sept. 14) that he was introducing legislation that would ban 10 toxic flame retardant chemicals from being used in children’s products and upholstered home furniture.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, September 5, 2014

It’s getting more likely that in the near future, when you go shopping for a couch or chair, it will no longer be saturated with pounds of toxic chemical fire retardants.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Tests published earlier this month by myself and other scientists at the Environmental Working Group and Duke University detected a biomarker indicating that all 26 children in our study had been exposed to a fire retardant called TDCIPP, linked to cancer and endocrine disruption. Their level of exposure was nearly five times the average level found in their mothers. In the most extreme case, a child had 23 times the level of the mother.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, August 4, 2014

Scientists at the Environmental Working Group and Duke University have found evidence that the average level of a cancer-causing fire retardant chemical in the bodies of children tested was nearly five times the average in their mothers, according to a new study released today.

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News Release
Monday, August 4, 2014

Last summer I was taking my one-year-old daughter to the pediatrician when a sign in the lobby caught my eye: Want to participate in a study on flame retardants?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Ten years ago, the Environmental Protection Agency and health advocates forced flame retardant chemicals called polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, from the market. These chemicals were showing up in people’s bodies and persisting in the environment, and research suggested they disrupted hormone signaling and brain and nervous system development.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The study of foam from 20 old and new crib mattresses found that mattresses release up to 30 different types of volatile organic compounds, also known as VOCs, among them, phenol, a strong skin and respiratory irritant.  The study detected other chemicals, including linalool and limonene, known fragrance allergens that can cause skin allergies. Repeated exposure over time increases the chances of an allergic reaction.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, January 17, 2014

 The chemical company Chemtura sued the state of California yesterday seeking to block new fire safety regulations that would permit furniture production without toxic flame retardants.   

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News Release
Thursday, November 21, 2013

 

Gov. Jerry Brown’s decision to revise regulations that led manufacturers to add large amounts of toxic fire retardants to foam furniture sold in California “is a public health victory for all Americans,” Environmental Working Group Research Director Renee Sharp said today.

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News Release
Wednesday, November 13, 2013

A landmark study led by Courtney Carignan of the Dartmouth Center for Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research has found that the blood of 11 female collegiate gymnasts ages 18 to 22 contained a potentially hazardous flame retardant known as PentaBDE in average concentrations 4 to 6.5 times higher than average for Americans.The research team attributed the gymnasts’ extraordinary levels of PentaBDE to constant exposure to gym pads made of polyurethane foam treated with fire retardants.  Foam padding and furniture have been routinely infused with toxic fire retardants in large part because of outdated fire safety standards that have encouraged manufacturers to rely on chemicals instead of non-chemical ways to make foam products less flammable.  

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Today (Nov. 13) in Seattle, HBO will screen a disturbing new documentary, The Toxic Hot Seat, that highlights the growing risk to firefighters – and the general public – of fire retardant chemicals that have long been added to furniture and other consumer products as a result of deceptive chemical industry lobbying.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, October 28, 2013

EWG and the Keep A Breast Foundation today released a guide to educate consumers about some of the most problematic hormone-altering chemicals that people are routinely exposed to. EWG parntered with KAB to develop the Dirty Dozen list of endocrine disruptors to highlight the prevalence of these toxic chemicals, how they affect our health and simple ways to avoid them.

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