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Chemical Policy

EWG is a leader in the effort to reform toxic chemical policy to ensure that all products are safe, especially for children. The government and consumers know little or nothing about the safety of more than 80,000 chemicals that can be used in consumer products.

Thursday, October 14, 2004

According to the Los Angeles Times, when confronted with criticism about the number of pollution lawsuits that EPA has filed during his tenure, EPA's Acting Enforcement Chief Tom Skinner asserted that EPA is actively pursuing settlements with polluters rather than lawsuits to punish violations of environmental laws.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, October 8, 2004

Yesterday House and Senate committee members agreed on a bill that would have the tobacco industry, rather than taxpayers, spend $9.6 billion to buy out tobacco quotas. While the bill rightly ends an outdated, lopsided subsidy system, Congress let slip a key provision that would have given the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the power to regulate the manufacture and sale of cigarettes.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, September 16, 2004

Which of those common expressions matches your outlook on consumer products and chemicals: look before you leap, or shoot first and ask questions later?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, September 2, 2004

A new study finds chemical flame retardants known as PBDEs contaminate common foods available on supermarket shelves. The study appears in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology and provides possible evidence that food may be a primary source of the flame retardant contamination found in humans.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, August 17, 2004

A study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology shows that farmed salmon accumulates higher levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) a chemical flame retardant used in furniture and electrical equipment. Some types of flame retardants have been banned in Europe and California because of health concerns.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 29, 2004

Refineries, power plants and other large industrial facilities in California that violate clean air laws typically pay penalties lower than what an SUV driver may legally be fined for a smog violation, according to an investigation of enforcement records by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, June 2, 2004

There's increasing concern about the risks of chemicals in personal care products. The Independent reports that the growing use of cosmetics and toiletries, which contain many known toxic or untested chemicals, may be harming children who will develop cancer and fertility problems as adults.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, May 10, 2004

The Republican Senate leadership's asbestos bailout bill appears dead for now, after negotiations stalled May 7. The bill would have denied thousands of Americans their day in court, reduced damage awards to victims of asbestos diseases, and run out of money well before the epidemic of asbestos deaths peak.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, May 7, 2004

A new study presented at a meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicologists and Chemists links the Teflon chemical C8 [also known as PFOA] to elevated cancer rates. Researchers found higher levels of prostate cancer in men and cervical and uterine cancer in women exposed to C8 than in the general population.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, April 20, 2004

EWG has investigated scores of harmful industrial chemicals, the companies that produce them and the government policies that permit Americans to be exposed to them in their food, water and the air. Our research has repeatedly borne out the need to shift the burden of proof and require manufacturers to substantiate chemicals' safety before use in consumer products.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, February 19, 2004

A National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel today recommended limits on chemical industry testing of pesticides and toxic chemicals on human subjects.

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News Release
Friday, June 6, 2003

EWG testifies at a EPA public meeting on teflon contamination, and charges DuPont repeatedly downplayed questions of the Teflon chemical’s toxicity.

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News Release
Wednesday, May 28, 2003

A series of studies published beginning in the 1950s shows that DuPont has known for at least 50 years that Teflon fumes at relatively low temperatures can cause an acute illness known as polymer fume fever. In several studies DuPont recruited human volunteers and intentionally exposed them to Teflon fumes to the point of illness. The results of these studies suggest that people cooking on Teflon and other non-stick pans may be at risk.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, April 28, 2003

Congresswoman Lois Capps today introduced legislation to protect Americans from perchlorate, a chemical contaminate that has seeped into underground water supplies and has recently been detected in agricultural products such as lettuce. The Preventing Perchlorate Pollution Act would accelerate the establishment of an EPA standard for perchlorate, and require the enhanced access to community "right to know" information about perchlorate contamination.

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News Release
Friday, April 11, 2003

EWG asks EPA administrator Whitman to investigation apparent reporting violations by DuPont Chemical. EWG submits documentation that DuPont had determined that 2 of 7 babies born to Teflon-exposed female workers in the company's Parkersburg WV plant had facial birth defects. DuPont had not reported this information to EPA as required under Section 8(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, April 11, 2003

EWG alleged today that the DuPont chemical company has violated federal law by withholding from the government for the last 22 years a company study that detected a toxic, Teflon-related chemical in the umbilical cord blood of one infant born to a company worker, and in the blood of another worker’s baby.

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News Release
Wednesday, January 8, 2003

A National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel, requested by the Bush Administration, will meet January 8-9, 2003 to begin its review of the ethics of chemical companies using humans in laboratory tests in order to loosen environmental safeguards on pesticides and other toxic chemicals.

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News Release
Wednesday, November 13, 2002

A review of federal and industry science on the toxic industrial chemical commonly called C8 (perflouroctanoic acid, used to make Teflon) reveals that water pollution policy by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is far less protective than previous industry standards.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, November 12, 2002

"Contamination of drinking water supplies by the toxic industrial chemical perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8) is a continuing concern to the residents of Parkersburg and surrounding areas of Wood County near the source of the pollution, DuPont’s manufacturing operation in Washington, West Virginia."

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, March 2, 2000
More than 2.3 million pounds of the acutely toxic pesticide methyl bromide are applied near California schools each year, but the state is proposing new regulations that ignore its own scientists' recommendations for protecting children from the lethal chemical, according to a report released today by Environmental Working Group. Read More
Key Issues:
News Release

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