Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

Chemical Policy

EWG is a leader in the effort to reform toxic chemical policy to ensure that all products are safe, especially for children. The government and consumers know little or nothing about the safety of more than 80,000 chemicals that can be used in consumer products.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

EWG applauds Senator Boxer’s leadership in fighting for reform of our broken toxics laws and protecting public health.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, June 30, 2014

If oil and gas companies were injecting potentially toxic fluids into the ground near your home or your children’s schoolyard, wouldn’t you want to know about it?

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, May 29, 2014

The American Chemistry Council, a trade association of major chemical makers, is among the largest donors to a fund created to support Sen. David Vitter’s campaign for governor of Louisiana.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, May 23, 2014

As Congress rushes to complete a new law that would seek to “reform” the decades-old Toxic Substances Control Act, political spending by chemical companies and their trade association has reached record levels, according to a new analysis by the Environmental Working Group.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, May 16, 2014

Environmental Working Group President Ken Cook will be the featured guest and honoree today (May 16) at the annual Greening Our Children event hosted by the Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC), part of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, May 15, 2014

Last month, the EPA official responsible for reviewing the safety of chemicals used in thousands of every-day products was asked how many chemicals in use are so dangerous they should get a harder look by the agency to protect public health and the environment.

The answer?

1,000.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, May 5, 2014

A revised draft of legislation to update the failed federal law that regulates toxic chemicals, which was released by Republican Rep. John Shimkus of Illinois following stiff criticism of his initial proposal, makes only cosmetic changes to his first draft. 

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 28, 2014

The Chemicals in Commerce Act discussion draft circulated in the House of Representatives earlier this year claims to advance the public interest.  We don’t think so.

 

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

SAN FRANCISCO – The California Department of Public Health today announced its final drinking water standard for the toxic chemical hexavalent chromium made infamous in the film Erin Brockovich. The state’s new Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 parts per billion is 500 times greater than the level identified as safe by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Washington, D.C.  – The decision by Avon, one of the world’s largest beauty product manufacturers, to remove the antibacterial chemical triclosan from its products is “the latest example of how consumer pressure can improve product safety and change the marketplace,” Environmental Working Group said in a statement today. 

Read More
News Release
Thursday, April 3, 2014

Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.) recently authored the Chemicals in Commerce Act, a discussion draft of legislation purporting to reform our nation’s weak and outdated chemicals management law, the Toxic Substances Control Act.

Read More
Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, March 31, 2014

Should chemicals we encounter every day be safe?

You’d think the answer would be an obvious and resounding “yes.” But if you ask chemical companies – or some lawmakers – they say that “safe” is relative. In their view, chemical companies should be able to use dangerous chemicals if restricting their use to protect people would be too costly. 

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 19, 2014

When 300,000 West Virginians went without water for three weeks earlier this year, most Americans were shocked to learn that health officials and the government didn’t know much about the licorice-smelling chemical that had leaked from a storage facility into the Elk River near Charleston. Hundreds of residents contacted the state’s Poison Control Center to report nausea, vomiting and rashes. Weeks after officials lifted the water ban, complaints of the licorice odor continue and the long-term health effects of the coal-processing substance – 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (Crude MCHM) – are still unknown.

 

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, March 13, 2014

The state of California has launched an important initiative to protect its residents from exposures to toxic substances by calling on industry to find safer alternatives for three widely used chemicals, Environmental Working Group said today in a statement.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Friday, February 28, 2014

Legislation proposed by Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.) to reform federal chemicals management law would leave the public at even greater risk of exposure to toxic substances than under the outdated current law, said Environmental Working Group in a statement today.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, January 27, 2014

Washington, D.C. – EWG executive director Heather White said that personal care products giant Johnson & Johnson has taken a major step forward by reformulating about 100 of its baby products to remove a potentially harmful chemical and to reduce levels of a second problematic substance. 

Read More
News Release
Tuesday, January 14, 2014

On January 9, more than 7,500 gallons of a chemical used to process coal – crude MCHM – spilled into West Virginia’s Elk River at a facility owned by Freedom Industries. 

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 13, 2014

EWG executive director Heather White assigned much of the blame for the devastating chemical spill in West Virginia to the nation’s lax chemical safety laws.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, January 6, 2014

EWG’s New Year’s resolution for cosmetic manufacturers:  shed bad actor ingredients that disrupt the hormone system, cause allergies and may accelerate skin cancer.

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Sunday, December 22, 2013

The federal Food and Drug administration has announced proposed rules that could drive unnecessary and potentially dangerous products from the market -- antibacterial hand soaps like those marketed by Dial, Softsoap and CVS.

This is a big deal.

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post

Pages

Subscribe to Chemical Policy