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BPA

EWG has pushed to ban BPA ever since it showed that the chemical leaches from can linings into foods, beverages and infant formula – and ends up in the bodies of 93 percent of Americans.

Friday, July 18, 2008
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Legislation introduced today will protect all formula-fed babies from being exposed to high levels of BPA by removing the toxic chemical from all food containers, including those for infant formula.

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News Release
Thursday, April 24, 2008

Environmental Working Group (EWG) renewed its call for all infant formula makers to remove the toxic chemical BPA from their containers in light of recent actions by the governments of the United States and Canada, as well as action by major retailers to pull products made with BPA from store shelves.

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News Release
Tuesday, April 22, 2008

BPA was invented nearly 120 years ago and currently used in enormous amounts to manufacture hard plastic water bottles and to make epoxy linings of metal food cans, like those for canned infant formula. Stuides conducted over the past 20 years now show it to be not only a ubiquitous pollutant in the human body - it contaminates nearly 93% of the population - but also a potent developmental toxin at very low doses.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, April 18, 2008

A day after the world’s largest retailer announced plans to pull all products containing the toxic chemical BPA from store shelves, Canada began moving forward with a total ban of the toxic chemical.

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News Release
Tuesday, April 15, 2008

In a dramatic development, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) raised concerns that the toxic plastics chemical known as Bisphenol A (BPA) may be linked to a number of serious reproductive and developmental problems that are common in the US population including breast cancer and early puberty.

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News Release
Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Late yesterday the two top investigators from the House Committee with oversight of FDA threatened subpoenas if information detailing FDA’s decision allowing the toxic chemical BPA in infant formula and other foods was not turned over to the Committee.

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News Release
Friday, March 21, 2008

In response to a congressional inquiry, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) admitted that it based its determination that current levels of BPA exposure pose no health risks on two studies sponsored by the American Plastics Council (APC), the trade group that represents BPA manufacturers.

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News Release
Friday, January 18, 2008

Following an analysis by Environmental Working Group (EWG) that found that all infant formula manufacturers in the U.S. are using the toxic chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) in their formula containers, Congressional leaders officially launched an investigation, demanding answers from infant formula companies.

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News Release
Monday, January 14, 2008

After a steady drumbeat of criticism from EWG, Congressman Henry Waxman (D-CA), outside scientists and mainstream media, the National Institute’s of Health’s (NIH) National Toxicology Program (NTP) has agreed to launch a top-down investigation into the Center for the Evaluation of Risk to Human Reproduction’s (CERHR) flawed, industry-friendly report on the health impacts of the dangerous toxic chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA).

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Liquid infant formula from the top manufacturers is sold in cans lined with a toxic chemical linked to reproductive disorders and neurobehavioral problems in laboratory animals, according to an investigation by Environmental Working Group (EWG). The chemical is almost as common in the packaging of powdered formula, with 4 of the top 5 companies acknowledging its use.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Many new parents are aware that the toxic chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) leaches from plastic baby bottles found on the shelves of stores across America. But a new investigation by EWG reveals that BPA is also used to line nearly all infant formula cans. BPA levels found in liquid formula are likely to be far higher than those that leach from bottles under normal use.

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News Release
Thursday, August 9, 2007

Laboratory tests of canned infant formula conducted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and a certified commercial laboratory reveal that a plastics chemical called bisphenol A (BPA) leaches from metal can linings into formula. According to a new EWG analyses, the amount of BPA ingested by some bottle-fed infants exceeds the doses that caused serious adverse effects in animal studies.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, August 8, 2007

Environmental Working Group (EWG) Senior Scientist Dr. Anila Jacob, MD, MPH, issued the following statement in response to the decision by a government sponsored panel to largely ignore wide ranging scientific research connecting human health risks with exposure to Bisphenol-A (BPA).

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News Release
Monday, August 6, 2007

The National Institutes of Health's (NIH's) Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) is assessing the health risks of the compound BPA, a toxic ingredient in plastics that contaminates an alarming number of packaged foods and is widely found in humans. But the CERHR assessment — prepared in part by a contractor since fired over concerns about conflicts of interest — fails to meet the most basic scientific standards, even as independent scientists have declared BPA a clear risk to human health.

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News Release
Thursday, August 2, 2007

The Chapel Hill consensus statement on BPA released today underscores, by way of contrast, how hopeless and corrupt the ongoing review of BPA by the NIH Center for The Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) really is.

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News Release
Thursday, July 12, 2007

EWG and East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) researchers analyzed samples of wastewater from residential, commercial, and industrial sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. 18 of 19 wastewater samples examined contained at least 1 of 3 unregulated, widely-used hormone disruptors – phthalates, bisphenol A, and triclosan; 2 samples contained all 3 substances. Despite sophisticated wastewater treatment, these chemicals were detected in treated waters discharged into the Bay.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, May 31, 2007

Answer: Stainless steel water bottles are the way to go, especially for hot liquids. Make sure your stainless steel bottle doesn't have a plastic liner inside, which may leach bisphenol-A (BPA), an industrial chemical linked to birth defects of the male and female reproductive systems and other health concerns.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, March 12, 2007

By now you've likely seen some of the national attention EWG’s recent report about Bisphenol A (BPA), an ingredient used in plastic bottles and in the lining of food cans, has generated. BPA has been shown to be toxic in low doses, and has been linked to breast and prostate cancer, diabetes and infertility. Pregnant women and infants are most at-risk, and yet there are currently no safety standards established.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 7, 2007

A 2006 client list for Sciences International, the consulting firm that is running CERHR. Read it and you will notice that it is essentially a who's who of the chemical industry (and their trade associations).

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EnviroBlog
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