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BPA

EWG has pushed to ban BPA ever since it showed that the chemical leaches from can linings into foods, beverages and infant formula – and ends up in the bodies of 93 percent of Americans.

Thursday, February 26, 2009

It is the federal law that industry loves and environmentalists love to hate, yet have been unable to reform since it was enacted a generation ago. But a congressional hearing convened today by Rep. Bobby Rush of Illinois may signal the beginning of the end of a federal policy that has made it all but impossible for the government to protect the public health from toxic industrial chemicals.

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News Release
Wednesday, February 25, 2009
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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, January 19, 2009

Newborn babies are more intensely exposed than previously documented to contamination by bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic estrogen and ubiquitous plastic component, according to two new studies published by Environmental Health Perspectives.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 26, 2008

In response to yesterday's report that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has found another toxic chemical -- this time melamine -- in infant formula, Environmental Working Group (EWG) today called on major formula makers to inform consumers what steps they are taking to ensure their products are safe.

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News Release
Friday, October 31, 2008

In the wake of an FDA advisory panel’s devastating rebuke of the agency’s safety assessment for the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol A (BPA) Environmental Working Group (EWG) has written North America’s leading infant formula manufacturers and canned food producers urging them to take immediate steps to remove BPA from canned infant formula and other canned foods.

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News Release
Wednesday, October 29, 2008

FDA’s advisory Science Board convened a BPA panel to evaluate an FDA staff risk assessment that termed bisphenol A (BPA) safe in food packaging. In its testimony to the panel, EWG highlighted 7 key shortcomings in the staff assessment. In every instance, the panel agreed with EWG and disagreed with the FDA staff report. The panel conclusions, released on October 28, will be formally presented to the full Science Board on October 31.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, October 28, 2008

In a stinging rebuke to the Food and Drug Administration, a key science advisory panel has broken with Bush FDA officials and the American Chemistry Council (ACC) and embraced the position of public health advocates and dozens of independent scientists that the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) may be a threat to human health.

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News Release
Thursday, October 23, 2008

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported today that internal documents from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) show that an agency task force assessment of the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) “was written largely by the plastics industry and others with a financial stake in the controversial chemical.”

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News Release
Tuesday, October 21, 2008

Safeway’s announcement today that it will stop selling baby bottles containing the plastics component bisphenol-A (BPA) in its 1,775 stores in the U.S. and Canada is a promising first step toward reducing infants’ exposure to the hormone-disrupting chemical.

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News Release
Friday, October 17, 2008

Although completely eliminating exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may not be possible, there are steps you can take to reduce your family's exposure to this chemical by avoiding common sources and limiting exposure for the highest risk groups.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, October 17, 2008

As soon as tomorrow, Canadian health officials are poised to list the synthetic sex hormone bisphenol-A (BPA) as a toxic substance. Canada’s action, which paves the way for an expected ban on BPA-based plastic baby bottles and BPA reductions in canned infant formula, is the most aggressive environmental health advance concerning the chemical undertaken by any nation.

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News Release
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

With yet another conflict of interest swirling around the Bush administration’s assessment of potential health risks from exposure to the toxic plastic chemical bisphenol-A (BPA), Environmental Working Group (EWG) has called on the FDA to halt all further work of the agency’s Science Board BPA subcommittee until a top-down investigation is concluded. 

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News Release
Saturday, October 11, 2008

Breast milk is best, but whether you're feeding breastmilk or formula in a bottle, use EWG's guide to feed your baby safely.  

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, September 16, 2008

At an open meeting today, officials from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) came under increased fire for the agency’s position that bisphenol A (BPA) - the artificial sex hormone and plastics chemical that has produced irreversible damage in test animals - should remain in food packaging, including infant formula containers and baby bottles.

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News Release
Monday, September 15, 2008

It takes a lot of nerve to go up against the $3 trillion-a-year global chemical industry.

Ask University of Missouri-Columbia scientists Frederick Vom Saal and Wade Welshons. They've been in the industry's crosshairs for more than a decade, since their experiments turned up the first hard evidence that miniscule amounts of bisphenol A (BPA), an artificial sex hormone and integral component of a vast array of plastic products, caused irreversible changes in the prostates of fetal mice.

 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, September 5, 2008

One of the unwritten rules of public relations is, if they’re running you out of town, get out front and say you’re leading the parade. That’s one way to read the American Chemistry Council’s assertion that it “welcomes” the Sept. 3 National Toxicology Program’s assessment of bisphenol A (BPA), an artificial sex hormone used to manufacture a vast array of plastics.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 3, 2008

The National Institutes of Health’s National Toxicology Program (NTP) concluded today that bisphenol A (BPA), an artificial sex hormone and chemical used in hard plastic products like baby bottles, may alter brain development and increase the risk of prostate cancer.

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News Release
Saturday, August 30, 2008

Bowing to a deceptive, no-holds-barred campaign by the chemical industry, the California State Assembly has failed to approve a bill that would have made the state the first in the nation to remove the toxic endocrine disruptor BPA from baby bottles and children’s drinking cups.

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News Release
Monday, August 18, 2008
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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, August 15, 2008

Environmental Working Group (EWG) Senior Analyst Renee Sharp issued the following statement in reaction to today’s announcement by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) claiming exposure to BPA from consumer products is safe for humans.

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News Release

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