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BPA

EWG has pushed to ban BPA ever since it showed that the chemical leaches from can linings into foods, beverages and infant formula – and ends up in the bodies of 93 percent of Americans.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Five years ago, tens of millions of baby bottles and sippy cups sold in the United States were manufactured with a petrochemical derivative called bisphenol A. Today, according to the American Chemistry Council, that number is - zero.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, October 7, 2011

 

Yielding to pressure from parents, health advocates, and lawmakers, the chemical industry has conceded that the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol-A should not be used to make baby bottles and sippy cups.

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News Release
Wednesday, October 5, 2011

 

California parents are cheering and letting out a sigh of relief with the news that Gov. Jerry Brown has signed legislation banning the hormone-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in baby bottles and sippy cups sold in the state despite fierce opposition from the chemical industry.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 30, 2011

 

The California State Senate voted today to ban the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol A from baby bottles and sippy cups sold in California.

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News Release
Thursday, July 14, 2011

Is your reusable water bottle aluminum? In an effort to be more sustainable and protect my health, I made the switch from plastic water bottles to my reliable metal bottle that I carry with me every day. I thought this switch was a positive change, which is why I'm a little concerned to read headlines that "Metal Water Bottles May Leach BPA."

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 7, 2011

Legislation to ban the toxic plastics chemical bisphenol A from baby bottles and sippy cups sold in California is moving to the California Senate floor.

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News Release
Thursday, May 26, 2011

Ever since EWG's 2007 report about BPA in food can linings was released, I've walked right past the canned food aisle in my grocery store. In fact, about a year ago, a bunch of EWG staffers challenged ourselves to go a full week eating no food from a can.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, May 26, 2011

Washington, D.C. -- A new study by the federal Food and Drug Administration has found canned green beans contaminated with as much as 730 parts per billion of bisphenol A, a synthetic hormone and component of epoxy can linings.

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News Release
Monday, April 25, 2011

Maine just became the ninth state to ban the use of bisphenol A in baby products.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, March 8, 2011

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has never taken steps to get BPA out of children's products, and just last fall the U.S. Senate dropped legislation to restrict BPA in baby bottles and sippy cups at the request of the chemical industry.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, February 24, 2011

Good news. Maine governor Paul LePage claims he has read the scientific research on the health dangers posed by bisphenol-A, the plastic component and synthetic estrogen.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, November 26, 2010

Just a week after a few members of Congress buckled to chemical industry interests and blocked language that would have banned BPA from baby bottles and sippy cups, the European Union is showing the courage to do the right thing for babies' health.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, November 26, 2010

Bisphenol-A (BPA) will be banned from baby bottles come June of 2011, announced the European Union’s executive commission on Thursday.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Raw political power was on display last week in the U.S. Senate. The "world's greatest deliberative body" had just completed two years of negotiations over legislation to safeguard the nation's food supply, and for the first time Congress was poised to take a moderate step in the right direction by restricting the use of the plastics chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in baby bottles and infants' sippy cups.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, November 19, 2010

Thanks to the tireless work and dogged determination of Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and her tremendous staff, there was a deal this week -- after months of negotiations -- to include some regulation of BPA in a food safety bill that will probably pass the Senate soon after Thanksgiving.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Exposure to butylparaben, an ingredient common in personal care products, has been associated with DNA damage in men's sperm, according to an important new study led by John Meeker of the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 20, 2010

The list of studies highlighting the health risks of the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) grows longer by the week. Of course, all research is important, but a new study by a team of scientists led by Gail S. Prins, Ph.D. of the University of Illinois at Chicago may be the most significant work on BPA in some time.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 20, 2010

 

EWG writes FDA commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg that a pivotal new study intensifies concerns about the danger of bisphenol A, plastics chemical and synthetic estrogen, to public health.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Firefighters and beat cops. Soldiers, farm workers, war correspondents and hard hats who dangle from high iron as they build skyscrapers. Those are a few professions most folks consider risky. And if you're pregnant and happen to work behind a cash register, you, too, are not risk-free.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 7, 2010

In a victory for the chemical industry and a great loss for the health of California's children, the California State Legislature on Tuesday narrowly failed to pass a bill that would have eliminated the plastics chemical, bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic estrogen, from baby bottles, sippy cups and infant formula cans sold in California.

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EnviroBlog
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