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Water

Monday, November 14, 2016

During her failed bid for vice president in 2008, that was Sarah Palin's crowd-pleasing chant promoting her energy policy. Now the pithy catchphrase – and the former Alaska governor herself – could make a comeback. 

Photo Courtesy of Christopher Halloran / shutterstock.com

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, October 13, 2016

Across the nation, Americans are seeing the price of farm pollution firsthand in contaminated drinking water, toxic algal blooms and pesticide-laden foods.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, September 15, 2016

What if your neighbor poured toxic chemicals into your drinking water but only agreed to pay for part of the cleanup? Well, that’s exactly what’s happening in northeastern Wisconsin. 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, September 8, 2016

From Florida beaches to Lake Erie to the California Delta, algal blooms threaten human health and aquatic ecosystems. Cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, produce toxins that can make people sick and even kill pets.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Low-tech, low-cost prairie strips on farms – buffers of grass, trees or other permanent vegetation planted along the banks of rivers, streams, lakes and other waterways – can reduce toxic farm pollution runoff, clean up drinking water and reduce water bills for consumers, according to a recent analysis by the Union of Concerned Scientists.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, August 5, 2016

Des Moines Water Works warned customers of elevated levels of microcystins, the toxins created by cyanobacteria, in their drinking water. These toxins cause acute problems with the liver, including liver failure, among other serious health problems.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, June 24, 2016

A new study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Geological Survey estimates that farm conservation practices in some parts of the Midwest have reduced farm pollution by 5-to-34 percent. Yet researchers are measuring near-record concentrations of farm pollution flowing down the Mississippi River this year.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, June 23, 2016

Manure pits that hold livestock and poultry waste give off foul-smelling toxic air pollutants that can be deadly to farmworkers and local residents, who often are powerless to defend the health of their families from the noxious emissions.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, June 16, 2016

Would you eat food grown with wastewater from oil and gas drilling? You could be already: farms in California's Central Valley, which produces 40 percent of the nation's fruits and vegetables, are allowed to use oil and gas wastewater to irrigate crops.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Near record concentrations of farm pollution were measured flowing down the Mississippi River in May, according to a recently published report.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 24, 2016

A news investigation last week reaffirmed that nitrate levels in the Des Moines River watershed exceed the Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water limit, posing a threat to infants, pregnant women and others for whom excessive nitrate can be a health hazard.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, May 16, 2016

We need a consistent approach to agricultural conservation.Driving around central Iowa on a crop survey this spring, EWG analysts came across a far-too-common scene: adjacent fields reflecting disparate responses to the problem of agricultural runoff. EWG’s report, “Fooling Ourselves,” showed that voluntary programs to encourage planting of protective vegetation along vulnerable waterways were not achieving lasting results.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

As summer approaches, so do the toxic algal blooms that plague Lake Erie every year, killing fish and making the water too dangerous to swim in.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Pollution in Minnesota’s drinking water has gotten worse in recent years, but no one wants to call out the industry responsible. It’s been the primary source of water pollution for decades, making water in some areas of the country dangerous to drink and costing local taxpayers millions of dollars to clean it up.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, April 21, 2016

Recently, spring weather in upper Midwest has been warmer and dryer, leading farmers in Iowa, Illinois and Minnesota to plant corn in early April. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Progress Report, since 2013 there's been a big rise in corn planted by mid-April, the earliest farmers in the region can plant and be eligible for federally subsidized crop insurance. 
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Sunday, February 7, 2016

Drinking water, lakes and rivers in Iowa and across the Corn Belt are in serious trouble because of polluted farm runoff.  To tackle the problem, for decades we’ve taken the approach favored by agricultural interests – making federal tax dollars available for conservation practices that curb runoff, encouraging farmers to adopt those practices, then hoping enough of them volunteer to do the right thing.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, February 4, 2016

new EWG report reveals the fatal flaw in the voluntary approach to cutting pollution from farm fields: Farmers who voluntarily start pollution control practices can just as easily stop.

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News Release
Monday, November 2, 2015

A recent study by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey has concluded that the water quality in 22 rivers over the past 65 years is terrible and not getting better, judging by the concentration of nitrates in the water.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, August 14, 2015

Clean water is vital to sustaining life. Why aren’t we protecting it?
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, June 17, 2015

A new law requiring grass “buffers” to be planted between cropland and Minnesota’s rivers and streams is an innovative and important step toward cutting pollution from farm operations, EWG said today.

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News Release

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