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Conservation

Friday, June 24, 2016

A new study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Geological Survey estimates that farm conservation practices in some parts of the Midwest have reduced farm pollution by 5-to-34 percent. Yet researchers are measuring near-record concentrations of farm pollution flowing down the Mississippi River this year.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, May 16, 2016

We need a consistent approach to agricultural conservation.Driving around central Iowa on a crop survey this spring, EWG analysts came across a far-too-common scene: adjacent fields reflecting disparate responses to the problem of agricultural runoff. EWG’s report, “Fooling Ourselves,” showed that voluntary programs to encourage planting of protective vegetation along vulnerable waterways were not achieving lasting results.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, May 13, 2016

The Obama administration is right to regulate methane from oil and gas wells. But there’s no good reason to exempt methane from agriculture – which is the second largest source of methane in the U.S. and the largest source globally.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 4, 2016

If true, it’s troubling news that cartoonist Rick Friday has been fired by the publication Farm News for an editorial cartoon suggesting that the chief executives of Monsanto, John Deere, DuPont and other multi-national agribusiness corporations are profiting at the expense of ordinary farmers.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

As summer approaches, so do the toxic algal blooms that plague Lake Erie every year, killing fish and making the water too dangerous to swim in.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, April 21, 2016

Recently, spring weather in upper Midwest has been warmer and dryer, leading farmers in Iowa, Illinois and Minnesota to plant corn in early April. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Crop Progress Report, since 2013 there's been a big rise in corn planted by mid-April, the earliest farmers in the region can plant and be eligible for federally subsidized crop insurance. 
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Sunday, February 7, 2016

Drinking water, lakes and rivers in Iowa and across the Corn Belt are in serious trouble because of polluted farm runoff.  To tackle the problem, for decades we’ve taken the approach favored by agricultural interests – making federal tax dollars available for conservation practices that curb runoff, encouraging farmers to adopt those practices, then hoping enough of them volunteer to do the right thing.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, February 4, 2016

new EWG report reveals the fatal flaw in the voluntary approach to cutting pollution from farm fields: Farmers who voluntarily start pollution control practices can just as easily stop.

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News Release
Wednesday, June 17, 2015

A new law requiring grass “buffers” to be planted between cropland and Minnesota’s rivers and streams is an innovative and important step toward cutting pollution from farm operations, EWG said today.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Tuesday, April 28, 2015

The so-called “prevented planting” component of the federal crop insurance program is wasting billions of dollars while encouraging growers to plow up wildlife-sustaining wetlands in the iconic Prairie Pothole Region of North and South Dakota.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, March 18, 2015

House Budget Committee Chairman Tom Price (R-Ga) put fat cat farmers ahead of hungry kids in his 10-year budget, cutting funding for food assistance by $140 billion over ten years and cutting farm subsidies by just $1 billion.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, February 2, 2015

Requiring farmers to plant 50-foot wide grass strips, or buffers, between cropland and streams would jumpstart progress toward cleaning Iowa’s dirty water while affecting only a handful of growers and a minuscule number of acres, a new report from Environmental Working Group shows.

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News Release
Thursday, December 11, 2014

In what has become an annual ritual, Congress unveiled this week a massive spending bill to keep the government going, which includes provisions that would cut hundreds of millions of dollars from vital programs that protect our land and water.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, October 31, 2014

Clean, cheap water from your tap might soon be a thing of the past.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 5, 2014

Corn-based ethanol is a major cause of the water pollution that is ravaging the Mississippi River basin and the Gulf of Mexico, a report by the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) inspector general concluded this week (Sept. 4).

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, September 4, 2014

A new audit from Office of the Inspector General at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency finds the agency’s strategy to reduce nutrient pollution in the Mississippi River Basin and Gulf of Mexico is ineffective.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 5, 2014

In 2013, an Environmental Working Group report titled “WASHOUT” documented that soil erosion across Iowa farm land during that spring’s heavy rains had been far worse than previous estimates – in some cases carrying away a devastating 40 tons of soil in a single week from fragile and poorly protected fields. In many places, runoff carved “ephemeral gullies” as a result of growers’ inadequate conservation measures.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, August 4, 2014

A new survey of Iowa farmland finds that “ephemeral gullies” are still ravaging many crop fields despite a few welcome signs of improvement compared to a year ago. Unprotected fields were once again battered by spring storms this year, according to a report released today by the Environmental Working Group.

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News Release
Monday, August 4, 2014

Simple, well-understood conservation measures would go a long way toward saving Lake Erie and hundreds of other water bodies afflicted with periodic algal blooms.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Saturday, April 26, 2014

Nearly 170 waterways in southern Minnesota get a grade of D or F because they lack the required protective strips of vegetation that prevent farm runoff from polluting nearby rivers and streams, according to a report card rating developed by Environmental Working Group.

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News Release

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