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Food

Few choices you make have as powerful an effect on your health and the planet as what you choose to eat. EWG empowers you with the facts on your food.

Thursday, June 5, 2014

Can you get too much of a good thing? When it comes to vitamin A, zinc and niacin, yes you can.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, June 4, 2014

EPA’s Risk Assessment is Too Flawed to Proceed - Comments from Environmental Working Group on the EPA’s Proposed Decision to Register EnlistTM Herbicide Containing 2,4-D and Glyphosate 

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, June 2, 2014

A fight is brewing over Dow’s Enlist® Duo, an extraordinarily potent weed-killer designed to kill the new generation of so-called “superweeds” that have mutated to withstand blasts of Monsanto’s popular weed-killer RoundUp.  

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, May 29, 2014

Ethanol’s Broken Promise: Using Less Corn Ethanol Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, May 15, 2014

 Sales of organic food topped $32 billion in 2013 – up 11.5 percent from the year before – and organic fruits and vegetables now account for more than 10 percent of all produce sold in the United States, according to a new survey by the Organic Trade Association.

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News Release
Thursday, May 15, 2014

What percentage of your child’s favorite cereal is sugar?

10 percent?

20 percent?

Try 50 percent (by weight), if your child is a fan of cereals like Kellogg’s Honey Smacks or Apple Jacks with Marshmallows. That’s what Environmental Working Group researchers found in a comprehensive analysis of 1,556 cereals, including 181 specifically targeted at children. 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, May 15, 2014

EWG’s analysis of more than 1,500 cereals, including more than 180 children’s cereals, shows that a child who eats a bowl a day for a year ends up consuming 10 pounds of sugar.

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Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Eating a bowl of kids’ cereal every day would add up to eating 10 pounds of sugar a year, according to a new Environmental Working Group analysis of more than 1,500 cereals, including 181 marketed for children.

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News Release
Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Will Coggin, a senior research analyst at the Center for Consumer Freedom, wrote in The Hill last week that “Vermont became the first state to mandate de facto warning labels on genetically improved foods (GIFs), also referred to as GMOs.”

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, May 8, 2014

Washington, D.C. – Renowned chef Tom Colicchio joined right-to-know advocates today to celebrate Vermont’s enactment of the first law in the U.S. that will require food manufacturers to label foods that have been genetically engineered or contain genetically engineered ingredients. 

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News Release
Tuesday, April 29, 2014

EWG charged today that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has failed to tell Americans – as required under federal law - tthat they have a right to know about the risks of pesticide exposure and ways they can reduce pesticides in their diets.  Because the EPA has not complied in full with the Congressional mandate, for more than a decade EWG has stepped in to fill the void by publishing its (2014) Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce.  EWG aims to help people eat healthy and reduce their exposure to pesticides in produce.

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News Release
Monday, April 28, 2014

Bananas are Americans' favorite fruit. The average American eats 10 pounds of the sweet yellow fruit yearly, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA 2012a). In 2012, the U.S. imported 9,589 million pounds of bananas, more than 95 percent of them grown in five tropical Latin American nations (USDA 2013).

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 28, 2014

The corn shoppers find on supermarket aisles and at farm stands is called “sweet corn” because it contains more sugar than its ancestor, field corn.  People eat sweet corn fresh on or off the cob, frozen or canned.  

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, April 25, 2014

When it comes to food and health, the agriculture system, and consumer choices, the conversation often starts around the dinner table. Laurie David, activist and producer, has written The Family Cooks, with Kirstin Uhrenholdt, her longtime collaborator, to get us talking about dishes that are simple, fast, “low in the bad stuff and high in the good stuff” – and that bring kids into the cooking process.  They demystify cooking terms and break down basic prep techniques to help us make stress-free meals that foster health, togetherness and happy palates.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, April 24, 2014

A chemical widely used on non-organic American apples was banned in the European Union in 2012 because its makers could not show it did not pose a risk to human health, according to a new analysis by Environmental Working Group.

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News Release
Thursday, April 24, 2014

Those pyramids of apples in the produce section of supermarkets year-round may look fresh, but sometimes they’re not. Apples are harvested once a year, in the autumn.  Growers apply a mixture of chemicals and a waxy coating to apples to protect the fruit during cold storage, which can last as long as a year.  

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 14, 2014

Coming soon to a farm field near you: massive applications of a zombie herbicide linked to everything from Parkinson’s disease to reproductive problems. 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, April 11, 2014

Just days after Congressional leaders installed a statue of agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug in the U.S. Capitol, the head of the International Panel on Climate Change made the startling assertion that Borlaug’s ideas for feeding millions of people were losing relevance.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, April 10, 2014

Today’s announcement by Walmart, the world’s biggest grocer, that it plans to sell a line of organic foods at competitive prices could eventually lower the cost of all organic food by expanding the footprint of organic agriculture, said Environmental Working Group Executive Director Heather White.

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News Release
Wednesday, April 9, 2014

 Legislation introduced today by Congressman Mike Pompeo (R-Kan.) - christened the “Deny Americans the Right-to-Know” or DARK act by critics - would block any federal or state action to require labeling of foods made with genetically engineered ingredients.

 

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News Release

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