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Farming

EWG works to build a farm and food system that makes people healthy, keeps working farm and ranch families on the land and improves the environment.

Friday, September 22, 2006

 

Autism: The continuing debate over whether vaccines play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders is more than academic, with children's health and industry wealth hanging in the balance. British billionaire Sir Richard Branson said yesterday he plans to invest $3 billion in technologies to help combat global warming. The investment, valued in 2006 dollars, will be made over the next 10 years in biofuels and other environmentally friendly ways to replace oil and coal.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, September 21, 2006

While sensationalists and those fond of chemical-intensive farming were ready to hang the organic industry at the first mention of an E coli outbreak, NYT farm and food columnist Nina Planck says the culprit is not spinach growers at all, but rather industrial beef and dairy farmers. E. coli O157:H7, the virus strain responsible for making humans ill, is not found in the intestines of cattle fed a natural diet of grass and hay. The virus thrives in the acidic stomachs of cattle fed on grain, the typical feed on industrial farms.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Purdue University has agreed to host one of a series of debates on farm subsidies and the next farm bill that EWG president Ken Cook has proposed to former House Agriculture Committee Chairman Larry Combest. Professor Otto Doering, an internationally respected agricultural economist, policy expert and educator would be serving as moderator.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 26, 2006

A new Environmental Working Group analysis identifies and posts online more than 1.2 million prospective recipients of a proposed $1.5 billion crop subsidy bonus contained in HR 4939, The Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, April 19, 2006

 

From The Huffington Post: "No, not the Stephen King novel. It's no work of fiction, but a growing horror just the same. Every spring, polluted waters from the Mississippi watershed drain into the Gulf of Mexico, bringing a feast of nitrates for algae, which literally take up all of the available oxygen in the process, killing any bottom-feeding sealife and driving away any other critters capable of moving, e.g. commercially attractive fish and seafood."

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, April 10, 2006
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Sunday, April 9, 2006

For over 20 years, scientists have documented the appearance of a summertime "Dead Zone" that all but obliterates marine life in what is arguably the nation's most important fishery, the Gulf of Mexico. Each year the Dead Zone grows to an area that is roughly the size of New Jersey - ranging from 5,000 to 8,000 square miles.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, February 3, 2006

In a proposal that “drew praise from the mining industry”, the EPA recently suggested we all stop worrying about air quality in America’s less populous areas, insisting that dust from those fruited plains and majestic mountains can’t possibly hurt you, as if the only air pollution in the world was the black stuff from tailpipes and smokestacks.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 9, 2005

This year, the New York Times reports, both farmers and the federal government are covering corn at potentially record levels. Farmers are struggling to store this year's bountiful corn harvest, even buying massive tarps to cover mountains of corn that must be left outdoors.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Two national environmental organizations, Environmental Working Group and Beyond Pesticides, joined today with the Fluoride Action Network in challenging the safety of new food tolerances issued by the EPA for the fluoride based pesticide, sulfuryl fluoride.

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News Release
Wednesday, September 14, 2005

Courtesy of U.S. taxpayers, a few hundred California farms in Fresno and Kings counties annually get enough water to supply every household in Los Angeles, at pennies on the dollar of the price paid by urban water users.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 14, 2005

The federal government is about to make a deal to give a few hundred California farmers control of more water than Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego combined use in a year — at pennies on the dollar of the price paid by urban water users.

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News Release
Wednesday, September 14, 2005

Courtesy of U.S. taxpayers, a few hundred farms in Fresno and Kings counties annually get enough water to supply every household in Los Angeles, at pennies on the dollar of the price paid by urban water users.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, August 3, 2005

Some of America's richest agribusinesses are double dipping from U.S.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, August 1, 2005

The New York Times maps out that tiny fraction of U.S. lands still unscathed by mining, farming, logging and other human endeavors. We better enjoy it while we can -- trends suggest these pristine lands are about to go the way of the dinosaur.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, May 19, 2005

As Congress prepares to vote on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) budget for the next year, U.S. Representatives Hilda Solis of California and Tim Bishop of New York will introduce an amendment that would bar the Agency from using staff time or money to analyze data from pesticide tests on human subjects. Their amendment also bars the EPA from conducting human pesticide experiments on its own.

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News Release
Thursday, March 17, 2005

The federal government has promised Central Valley agribusinesses that it will increase the amount of taxpayer-subsidized irrigation water by 44 percent over the next 25 years, well beyond what the state's infrastructure can reliably supply, according to Bureau of Reclamation documents obtained by EWG.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, March 17, 2005

Feds Promise Big Ag Water That Isn't There

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, February 10, 2005

The Bush administration is paying some of the biggest and richest agribusinesses in America $17 million for cutbacks in their taxpayer-subsidized water supply. But an EWG investigation found that these same California agribusinesses — including the world's biggest cotton producer and the largest farm in America — already get hundreds of millions of tax dollars from other federal farm subsidy programs.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 10, 2005

For decades taxpayers have provided subsidized water to California farmers at rates far below fair market value.

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Reports & Consumer Guides

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