Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

Farming

America's wetlands and prairies are being lost and our drinking water and food supplies are contaminated with toxic pesticides, fertilizers, hormones and antibiotics. The productivity of our farmland is being depleted, threatening future generations of farmers.

Many farmers are producing food in ways that protect family farms and the environment. But farm policies are doing too little to reward good stewardship and too much to underwrite unsustainable crop and animal production by the largest and most successful farm businesses.

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Chicago Tribune, Andrew Martin

Published April 9, 2006

A new study on Monday found that a relatively small percentage of rural counties – many of them in Illinois – are contributing most of the fertilizer pollution that is creating a summertime “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico, where massive algae blooms snuff out most aquatic life.

 

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

Farm Futures, Jacqui Fatka

Published April 9, 2006

Nitrate pollution in the Mississippi River Basin is a growing problem, creating a Dead Zone downstream for marine wildlife. A new analysis from the Environmental Working Group shows that the problem is more solvable than it ever has looked before if the federal government begins to focus conservation needs in the trouble area.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Nancy Cole

Published April 10, 2006

Farmers in 15 northeast Arkansas counties are among the top contributors of fertilizer pollution that creates a "dead zone" of more than 5, 000 square miles in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a study released Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

New Orleans Times-Picayune, Matthew Brown

Published April 16, 2006

Louisiana's fishing industry faces an uncertain future after the pounding it took last hurricane season, but fishers know one thing is certain: Sometime this summer, a lifeless expanse of water about the size of Connecticut -- maybe a little bigger, maybe a little smaller -- will form off the state's coast.

Read More
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Delta Farm Press, David Bennett

Published May 4, 2006

In what could be the first significant shot fired in the 2007 farm bill debate, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released a report on how Mississippi River Basin (MRB) fertilizer run-off is contributing to a massive oxygen-depleted hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minnesota Pilot-Independent, Babe Winkelman

Published June 19, 2006

What grows larger with each passing summer and is roughly the size of New Jersey? The answer: the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, one of the world's most dynamic fisheries.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Peoria Journal Star, Steve Tarter

Published June 25, 2006

It's an area the size of Connecticut that fails to harbor aquatic life in the Gulf of Mexico.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Aberdeen American, Larry Gabriel

Published August 24, 2006

If you have not heard of it, you will. The mass media is blaming "agriculture" for a predicted increase in the size of the so-called "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Bill Lambrecht
Published June 14, 2007

There was hope for a cure down in the Louisiana bayous even as the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone expanded like a B-movie blob.

Read More
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Bakersfield Californian, Bill Walker

Published October 29, 2005

In his recent Community Voices column, the president of Westlands Water District blasted Environmental Working Group's investigation of the district's proposed federal water subsidies contract.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Gannett News Service (Detroit Free Press), Doug Abrahms

Published June 4, 2008

Robert Harrold missed the 2000 deadline for filing a benefit discrimination claim against the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

Statement of Ken Cook, President, Environmental Working Group House Agriculture Chairman Collin Peterson, Ranking Member Bob Goodlatte, members of their committee, and their staffs, are to be commended for working long and hard to produce the Farm Bill passed by the House of Representatives today.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Farm state senators, confronting an increasing struggle to win special disaster assistance for farmers, today will push for creation of a permanent disaster aid trust fund. The Senate Finance Committee will debate a new $6.1 billion trust fund that's been proposed by its chairman, Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

Washington, D.C. - Some growers could get payments just to keep farming the way they already are, under changes being made to a House climate bill. Farm groups won provisions in the legislation that are intended to make it easier for farmers to qualify for a new carbon offset program that would be established by the bill.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009


Published November 19, 2007

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Argus Leader, Faith Bremner

Published September 10, 2008

Senate Democrats are about to renege on an earlier plan to give more money to programs that pay farmers and ranchers to protect wildlife habitat and water quality, a spokesman for the Environmental Working Group said Tuesday.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Des Moines Register, Philip Brasher

Published September 10, 2008

The new farm bill has barely taken effect and the Democrat-controlled Senate is already moving to shrink spending levels for some land-conservation programs, environmental groups say.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Des Moines Register , PHILIP BRASHER

Published May 29, 2009

Washington, D.C. - Government conservation money in Iowa should be targeted to farms in areas that pollute the Mississippi River basin and cause a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, an environmental group says.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Federal regulators are negotiating an agricultural water contract in the Central Valley, the latest of several dozen deals that could tie up water resources for the next 50 years. Thursday is the public's last day to comment on the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's proposal to renew its long-term contract with Westlands Water District, which provides water to some 800 farms in Fresno and Kings counties.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

After 50 years of legal infighting, a victor has emerged in California's water wars -- agriculture. A decade after environmentalists prevailed in getting more fresh water down the north state's rivers and estuaries to improve fisheries and wildlife habitat, farmers are again triumphant. Central Valley irrigation districts are signing federal contracts that assure their farms ample water for the next 25 to 50 years.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post

Pages

Subscribe to Farming