Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

The Issue

Farming

EWG works to build a farm and food system that makes people healthy, keeps working farm and ranch families on the land and improves the environment.

Highlights

Troubled Waters Read More
The Top Stories of the Year in Agriculture, Food and Water Read More

Sign Up

Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts & environmental tips from EWG. [Privacy]

  

 

The Latest on Farming

Friday, February 3, 2006

In a proposal that “drew praise from the mining industry”, the EPA recently suggested we all stop worrying about air quality in America’s less populous areas, insisting that dust from those fruited plains and majestic mountains can’t possibly hurt you, as if the only air pollution in the world was the black stuff from tailpipes and smokestacks.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 9, 2005

This year, the New York Times reports, both farmers and the federal government are covering corn at potentially record levels. Farmers are struggling to store this year's bountiful corn harvest, even buying massive tarps to cover mountains of corn that must be left outdoors.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Two national environmental organizations, Environmental Working Group and Beyond Pesticides, joined today with the Fluoride Action Network in challenging the safety of new food tolerances issued by the EPA for the fluoride based pesticide, sulfuryl fluoride.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, September 14, 2005

Courtesy of U.S. taxpayers, a few hundred California farms in Fresno and Kings counties annually get enough water to supply every household in Los Angeles, at pennies on the dollar of the price paid by urban water users.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 14, 2005

The federal government is about to make a deal to give a few hundred California farmers control of more water than Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego combined use in a year — at pennies on the dollar of the price paid by urban water users.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, September 14, 2005

Courtesy of U.S. taxpayers, a few hundred farms in Fresno and Kings counties annually get enough water to supply every household in Los Angeles, at pennies on the dollar of the price paid by urban water users.

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, August 3, 2005

Some of America's richest agribusinesses are double dipping from U.S.

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, August 1, 2005

The New York Times maps out that tiny fraction of U.S. lands still unscathed by mining, farming, logging and other human endeavors. We better enjoy it while we can -- trends suggest these pristine lands are about to go the way of the dinosaur.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, May 19, 2005

As Congress prepares to vote on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) budget for the next year, U.S. Representatives Hilda Solis of California and Tim Bishop of New York will introduce an amendment that would bar the Agency from using staff time or money to analyze data from pesticide tests on human subjects. Their amendment also bars the EPA from conducting human pesticide experiments on its own.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, March 17, 2005

The federal government has promised Central Valley agribusinesses that it will increase the amount of taxpayer-subsidized irrigation water by 44 percent over the next 25 years, well beyond what the state's infrastructure can reliably supply, according to Bureau of Reclamation documents obtained by EWG.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, March 17, 2005

Feds Promise Big Ag Water That Isn't There

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, February 10, 2005

The Bush administration is paying some of the biggest and richest agribusinesses in America $17 million for cutbacks in their taxpayer-subsidized water supply. But an EWG investigation found that these same California agribusinesses — including the world's biggest cotton producer and the largest farm in America — already get hundreds of millions of tax dollars from other federal farm subsidy programs.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 10, 2005

For decades taxpayers have provided subsidized water to California farmers at rates far below fair market value.

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 6, 2004

The plight of Florida's farmers in the aftermath of four successive hurricanes has been a focus of media attention, and of calls from political leaders for an estimated $400 million or more in much needed aid for the state's devastated citrus, veg

Read More
Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

At a Subcommittee hearing September 28, Chairman Steve Chabot (R-OH 1st) and other members supported the main findings in Environmental Working Group's (EWG) July 2004 investigation, which reported that the landmark 1999 civil rights settlement of black family farmers' discrimination claims against USDA (Pigford v. Glickman) has been almost a complete failure and must be redressed.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

A new investigation by Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the National Black Farmers' Association (NBFA) finds that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) willfully obstructed justice by deliberately undermining the terms of a 1

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

A new investigation by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the National Black Farmers Association reveals that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) withheld nearly three out of every four dollars in a $2.3 billion landmark civil rights settlement with black farmers.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Tuesday, June 1, 2004

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) says tests on salmon and trout raised in federal hatcheries in the Northeast found enough PCBs and other toxic chemicals that consumers should severely limit consumption – no more than one meal of the fish every two months.

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 18, 2004

The Oregonian reports consumers are increasingly choosing healthy wild salmon instead of PCB-laden farmed salmon. Studies over the past year by EWG and others have shown that farmed salmon has far higher levels of toxic PCBs than wild salmon. Higher prices for wild salmon are good news for Alaska and other West Coast fishermen who have struggled in recent decades.

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, February 1, 2002

This week, Monsanto and Solutia defend themselves in a lawsuit by 3,500 plaintiffs seeking compensation for health and environmental damage left behind by the company's production of PCBs in Anniston, Alabama.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release

Pages

Subscribe to The Latest on Farming