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Farming

EWG works to build a farm and food system that makes people healthy, keeps working farm and ranch families on the land and improves the environment.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Fifty members of Congress are standing up for children’s health by urging the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Agriculture to reject a new toxic weed killer, “Enlist DuoTM,” and the genetically engineered seeds that would be used with it.

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News Release
Thursday, July 31, 2014

Rep. Rodney Davis (R-Ill.) and some of his colleagues are telling American consumers they can’t handle the truth.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Next Tuesday (Aug. 5), Missourians will decide if their state constitution should be amended to enshrine a so-called “Right-to-Farm” provision. The vaguely worded and open-ended amendment states, “the right of farmers and ranchers to engage in farming and ranching practices shall be forever guaranteed in this state.”

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 29, 2014

A new study from the University of Minnesota confirms what we’ve been saying – big agriculture is contaminating your drinking water.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Believe it or not, choosing between a burger and a chicken sandwich can affect more than just your waistline.

A new study led by scientists at Bard College in New York shows that going for beef has 10 times the environmental impact of eating any other kind of meat.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

There are 5,532 American schools within 200 feet of farm fields that may soon be blanketed with massive amounts of a toxic defoliant linked to Parkinson’s disease, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and reproductive and immune system problems.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 1, 2014

If every American simply switched from beef to chicken, we could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 137 million metric tons of carbon  — or as much as taking 26 million cars off the road. 

That’s because beef produces eight times as much greenhouse gases as chicken (and 20 times as much as vegetable proteins like beans).

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, June 26, 2014

When U.S. Department of Agriculture’s annual spending bill comes up for action again in the House and Senate next month, Congress may finally get a chance to rein in unlimited, secret subsidies to some of the nation’s largest farm businesses.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Corn is in the food we eat, the soda we drink, the gas we buy, plastics, cleaners – it’s everywhere.

Producing all that corn is a $1.7 trillion industry in the United States, and as a new report documents, it’s one that takes a tremendous toll on the environment and is under threat from water shortages and climate change. But federal policies continue to encourage corn growers and corn-based industries to stay on an unsustainable course.  

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, June 11, 2014

When people think about the causes of global warming, the food they eat typically doesn’t make the short list. But agriculture is responsible for 80 percent of human-caused emissions of nitrous oxide, which is a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

And now a new study by researchers at Michigan State University shows that using more fertilizers than crops need is even more harmful to the climate than previous estimates indicated.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The Renewable Fuels Association, a well-funded lobbyist group for Big Ethanol, recently responded to EWG’s report, Ethanol’s Broken Promise, by claiming that corn ethanol isn’t worse for the climate than gasoline.  

RFA hasn't done its homework. Recent peer-reviewed research shows that the model RFA uses to mount its defense drastically under-estimates carbon emissions.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, June 5, 2014

We already knew that corn ethanol produces more greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline.

Now the Obama Administration says corn ethanol is thirstier than gasoline.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, June 4, 2014

The Environmental Protection Agency appears poised to approve Dow Chemical’s bid to market a new toxic weed killer based on an agency analysis that failed to consider its danger to children’s health, as federal law requires.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, June 4, 2014

EPA’s Risk Assessment is Too Flawed to Proceed - Comments from Environmental Working Group on the EPA’s Proposed Decision to Register EnlistTM Herbicide Containing 2,4-D and Glyphosate 

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, June 2, 2014

A fight is brewing over Dow’s Enlist® Duo, an extraordinarily potent weed-killer designed to kill the new generation of so-called “superweeds” that have mutated to withstand blasts of Monsanto’s popular weed-killer RoundUp.  

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, May 29, 2014

 A proposal now being considered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to cut the amount of corn ethanol required in gasoline would lower greenhouse gas emissions by 3 million metric tons, according to a new report released by the Environmental Working Group.

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News Release
Thursday, May 29, 2014

Ethanol’s Broken Promise: Using Less Corn Ethanol Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, May 23, 2014

Scientists at the International Agency for Research on Cancer have found what appears to be a strong link between pesticide exposure and a blood cancer called non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, May 2, 2014

In a report released earlier this week, the World Health Organization warned that excessive use of antimicrobials, including in livestock, has generated worldwide drug resistance that threatens a “post-antibiotic era” when infections caused by bacteria, parasites, viruses and fungi can no longer be treated.

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News Release
Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The USDA Inspector General’s audit, released earlier this month, found that the heavily-subsidized crop insurance program suffered from an error rate for improper payments of at least 5.23 percent. The audit said the actual number could be higher.   And it’s significantly up from last year’s error rate of 4.08 percent.

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AgMag
Blog Post

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