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Farming

EWG works to build a farm and food system that makes people healthy, keeps working farm and ranch families on the land and improves the environment.

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The Latest on Farming

Monday, October 5, 2009

Farm industry leaders and their supporters in Congress are trying to derail climate change legislation by insisting that the House-passed bill, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES), will cause ruinous increases in the costs of production for farmers. They claim this threat is so potentially devastating that climate change legislation should be shelved or loaded up with concessions that send more money to their agricultural constituents.

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News Release
Wednesday, September 30, 2009

California agriculture, which grows roughly 40 percent of America’s food, faces grave threats spurred by climate change, including volatile weather, crippling drought and assaults by growing hordes of pests. It also directly generates about 6 percent of California’s greenhouse gas emissions.

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News Release
Monday, September 28, 2009

 

by Kari Hamerschlag

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, September 24, 2009

Remarks by Environmental Working Group Midwest Vice-President Craig Cox to the Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force Public Meeting.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, September 24, 2009

A representative from the Washington, D.C. based Environmental Working Group (EWG) has been asked to present remarks to the Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force Public Meeting held today in Des Moines, IA. In his comments, EWG Midwest Vice-President Craig Cox provided a clear-eyed and no-nonsense assessment of the state of pollution flowing into the Mississippi River Basin and how it contributes to the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone.

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News Release
Wednesday, September 23, 2009

 

 

EWG testifies before the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force that farm run-off in the Mississippi River Basin expands the Gulf of Mexico “dead zone.”

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published March 17, 2005

The federal government is promising 43% more water for California farmers in new irrigation contracts, meaning new dams would have to be built in the next two decades, a new environmental report warns.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

US Fed News

Published May 24, 2005

The office of Sen. Russell Feingold, D-Wis., issued the following press release: Sen. Russ Feingold has introduced legislation that could help save $2.5 billion over the next five years.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Sacramento Bee, Jim Wasserman

Published August 1, 2005

A national environmental group critical of farm subsidies said Tuesday that more than 1,200 Central Valley farms received federally subsidized water to grow subsidized crops in 2002.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

Fresno Bee, Dennis Pollock and Robert Rodriguez

Published August 2, 2005

Many farms in California's Central Valley Water Project are "double dipping" in taxpayer pockets by using subsidized water to grow subsidized crops, a watchdog group charged Tuesday.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

Associated Press, Terence Chea

Published August 2, 2005

Some of California's largest farms receive millions of dollars in federal subsidies by "double dipping" - using government-subsidized water to grow subsidized crops such as rice and cotton, according to a watchdog group's analysis.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Associated Press (+ 60 outlets), Garance Burke

Published May 29, 2007

Some of the nation's largest farming operations are paying rock-bottom rates for the electricity they use to pump federally subsidized water to their fields.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Central Valley Business Times

Published May 29, 2007

Some Central Valley farms are paying pennies for the electricity needed to deliver irrigation water, claims a report Wednesday from the Environmental Working Group, which describes itself as “a non-profit, non-partisan organization” that gets the majority of its funding from private charitable foundations.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Capital Press, Bob Krauter

Published May 29, 2007

Central Valley farmers are amped up by a study that says they are getting cut-rate electricity from the federal government.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

The Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published May 29, 2007

Farmers in the Westlands Water District are underpaying to the tune of $71 million annually on cheap electricity for federal water deliveries, says an environmental watchdog group.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

Minneapolis Star Tribune, Kevin Diaz

Published July 27, 2007

Do millionaire farmers need a safety net?

The question looms tall as a prairie silo over a multitude of controversies fueling congressional debate over the nation's next big farm bill.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Des Moines Register

Published July 14, 2007

Work on the 2007 farm bill comes at an exciting time for agriculture in America. Adding energy crops as a third major source of income, along with food and fiber, has the potential to profoundly change the economics of agriculture, boost incomes and revitalize the countryside.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009


Published June 11, 2007

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minneapolis Star Tribune

Published September 18, 2006

The idea that agriculture has become a major source of pollution in the Mississippi River will startle many Midwesterners. But it's no surprise to the government's top environmental regulators.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

New Standard, Jessica Azulay

Published April 11, 2006

Every summer, a huge swell of algae spreads through the Gulf of Mexico and then dies, smothering aquatic life in its wake. Scientists have documented this expanding "dead zone" since the early 1970s, finding that in recent years it has grown to an average of 14,000 square miles of ocean.

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AgMag
Blog Post

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