Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

Subsidies

EWG’s renowned farm subsidy database reveals that taxpayer support goes mostly to large, profitable operations, not to sustainable family farms that truly need the help. We’re working to change a badly broken system.

Sunday, June 5, 2005

Ken Cook and Chris Campbell [1]
June 9, 2005

Read More
Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, May 24, 2005

Scott Canon's front-page Kansas City Star story shows many ways our food choices make political, health and environmental statements. EWG's food research has contributed to the debate.

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 24, 2005

A prominent U.S. senator introduced legislation Tuesday to limit federal water subsidies to the richest corporate farms — a measure that could reduce the flow of cheap, taxpayer-subsidized water to many of the biggest agribusinesses in California and other Western states.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, May 5, 2005

USDA's new food pyramid encourages Americans to make fruits and vegetables the lion's share of their diets, but this policy, the Chicago Tribune points out, doesn't stack up with the crops the agency pays farmers to grow.

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 27, 2005

An Iowa state senator who called public workers requesting better retirement benefits “bottom feeders with their hand out” has been caught with his own hand in the cookie jar. Sen. Mark Zieman was forced to admit that he and his wife have received over $1 million in federal farm subsidies since 1993.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, March 17, 2005

The federal government has promised Central Valley agribusinesses that it will increase the amount of taxpayer-subsidized irrigation water by 44 percent over the next 25 years, well beyond what the state's infrastructure can reliably supply, according to Bureau of Reclamation documents obtained by EWG.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2005

 

The Associated Press reports that Congress is considering cutting food programs for the poor instead of reforming wasteful farm subsidies to huge agribusinesses. The farm programs cost taxpayers billions while hurting small family farms and ranches.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2005

Congressional Quarterly reports that Senator Grassley (R-IA) won support on his amendment to reasonably limit wasteful farm payments.

Read More
Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2005

The federal government has promised Central Valley agribusinesses it will increase the amount of taxpayer-subsidized irrigation water by 44 percent over the next 25 years, well beyond what the state's infrastructure can reliably supply, according to Bureau of Reclamation documents obtained by the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, February 10, 2005

The Bush administration is paying some of the biggest and richest agribusinesses in America $17 million for cutbacks in their taxpayer-subsidized water supply. But an EWG investigation found that these same California agribusinesses — including the world's biggest cotton producer and the largest farm in America — already get hundreds of millions of tax dollars from other federal farm subsidy programs.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 10, 2005

For decades taxpayers have provided subsidized water to California farmers at rates far below fair market value.

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, February 10, 2005

The Bush Administration is paying some of the biggest and richest agribusinesses in America $17 million for cutbacks in their taxpayer-subsidized water supply. But an Environmental Working Group (EWG) investigation found that these same California agribusinesses — including the world's biggest cotton producer and the largest farm in America — already get hundreds of millions of tax dollars from other federal farm subsidy programs.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Friday, January 7, 2005

Days after its new Freedom of Information law took effect, and spurred by a joint request from The Guardian newspaper of London and the Foreign Policy Centre (FPC) a London-based think tank on global issues, and a landmark 2004 report by international aid charity Oxfam, the United Kingdom will for the first time disclose the identity of recipients of some $6.4 billion in annual farm subsidy payments.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, December 15, 2004

Every year, U.S. taxpayers give California farmers a $400 million Christmas present.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Friday, November 19, 2004

Kenneth A. Cook

Speech to The American Bankers Association
Agricultural Bankers Annual Meeting Minneapolis, Minnesota
November 16, 2004


Read More
Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, October 8, 2004

Yesterday House and Senate committee members agreed on a bill that would have the tobacco industry, rather than taxpayers, spend $9.6 billion to buy out tobacco quotas. While the bill rightly ends an outdated, lopsided subsidy system, Congress let slip a key provision that would have given the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the power to regulate the manufacture and sale of cigarettes.

Read More
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 6, 2004

The plight of Florida's farmers in the aftermath of four successive hurricanes has been a focus of media attention, and of calls from political leaders for an estimated $400 million or more in much needed aid for the state's devastated citrus, veg

Read More
Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

A new investigation by Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the National Black Farmers' Association (NBFA) finds that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) willfully obstructed justice by deliberately undermining the terms of a 1

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, July 19, 2004

A new investigation by the Environmental Working Group  and the National Black Farmers Association reveals that the U.S. Department of Agriculture withheld nearly three out of every four dollars in a $2.3 billion landmark civil rights settlement with black farmers.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, June 27, 2001

Summary

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides

Pages

Subscribe to Subsidies