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Subsidies

EWG’s renowned farm subsidy database reveals that taxpayer support goes mostly to large, profitable operations, not to sustainable family farms that truly need the help. We’re working to change a badly broken system.

Thursday, December 11, 2008

The Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) West Coast office has written the California Air Resources Board pointing out deficiencies in its Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan with respect to agriculture and its role in generating greenhouse gas emissions.

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News Release
Wednesday, December 10, 2008
Mary D. Nichols, Chairman California Air Resources Board Members & Staff California Air Resources Board 1001 I Street PO Box 2815 Sacramento, CA 95812

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, November 25, 2008

In times of tight budgets and empty federal coffers, millionaires, large profitable farm operations and wealthy absentee landlords are still receiving federal farm subsidies, despite repeated attempts at reform by fiscal watchdogs, hunger advocates and environmental groups.

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News Release
Monday, September 22, 2008

When Congress passed the 2008 farm bill on June 18, 2008, it promised to increase funding for the most important and popular program in farm country to prevent water pollution and tackle other priority conservation problems. The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) was to be funded at $1.337 billion dollars in fiscal year 2009-an increase of $320 million over the fiscal year 2007 funding for EQIP.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, September 9, 2008

Behind the thin green gloss Congressional leaders spread across the subsidy-laden 2008 farm bill, the Democratic Congress is now hacking away at pledges to expand conservation and other environmental programs.

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News Release
Monday, September 8, 2008

Behind the thin green gloss Congressional leaders spread across the subsidy-laden 2008 farm bill, key Democratic lawmakers are hacking away at promises to expand conservation and other environmental programs.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, September 8, 2008

Behind the thin green gloss Congressional leaders spread across the subsidy-laden 2008 farm bill, key Democratic lawmakers are hacking away at promises to expand conservation and other environmental programs. Without proper conservation funding, few resources are available to mitigate the environmental damage caused by modern commodity crop agriculture.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, August 15, 2008

EWG's Ken Cook is interviewed about farm subsidies.

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Video
Thursday, May 15, 2008

WASHINGTON, DC - Today a subcommittee for Congress’s Committee on Oversight and Government Reform convened a hearing on “Management of Civil Rights at the United States Department of Agriculture”.

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News Release
Tuesday, April 29, 2008

By any measure, 2007 was a banner year for farmers of grain, soybeans and cotton, as high prices for their crops earned them record net income, even after they paid skyrocketing costs for fuel, fertilizer and seed.

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News Release
Monday, April 14, 2008

Over the next few weeks, some American couples will get $1,200 of their own money back from Washington. This is the maximum, one-time tax rebate Congress provided last February in their desperate attempt to revive our faltering economy that has since been declared in recession. By contrast, in a few months some other American couples, who operate some of the largest, most profitable farms in the country or merely own huge swaths of farmland, could be receiving 100 times that amount from the government--$120,000.

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News Release
Friday, March 21, 2008
Download this letter as a PDF March 21, 2008
The Honorable Harry M. Reid Majority Leader The Honorable Mitch McConnell Minority Leader
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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, March 4, 2008

WASHINGTON, March 3 – Last week, U.S. Department of Agriculture officials ordered auditors from the Government Accountability Office out of their offices, and ordered USDA employees not to speak with them.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Charles Lane uncorked this beaut last week, after the Dorgan-Grassley and Klobuchar amendments went down.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, December 10, 2007

After weeks of haggling, the Senate is set to deliberate on the 2007 Farm Bill. The Environmental Working Group, along with a diverse coalition of groups, is advocating for reform of wasteful government spending in farm programs.

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News Release
Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Today, the Environmental Working Group sent the attached letter to Congressional leadership expressing opposition to the reported Renewable Fuels package in the Energy Bill.

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News Release
Wednesday, October 31, 2007

Members of the media are invited to join Indiana Senator Richard Lugar and EWG president Ken Cook on Thursday, November 1st for a press conference announcing the launch of the EWG report on Direct Payments: Subsidies on Autopilot.

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News Release
Tuesday, October 2, 2007

Plans for a permanent trust fund to compensate farmers and ranchers for weather-related losses will send even more agricultural subsidies to the very regions that already receive the lion’s share. Based on their historical share of ad hoc disaster spending, of the twenty states represented on the Senate Finance Committee, just four stand to gain over half (55 percent) of the committee’s allocation of disaster aid expenditures under a permanent fund: North Dakota, Kansas, Iowa and Montana.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, October 1, 2007

A bid to establish a dedicated trust fund to compensate farmers and ranchers who suffer weather damage to crops and livestock would direct most of the funds to a handful of states where agricultural disaster “emergencies” are in fact routine, virtually annual occurrences, primarily because of low rainfall.

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News Release
Monday, October 1, 2007

The concentrated, predictable, repetitive nature of agricultural disaster aid among a few states with perennially poor growing conditions raises the question of whether the time has come for states to assume a primary role in providing agricultural disaster assistance within their borders.

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AgMag
Blog Post

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