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Conservation

Farms and ranches cover more than half of all land in the United States. EWG works to keep the land productive and to protect soil, water and wildlife.

Thursday, May 16, 2002

Pollution from airborne soot and dust causes or contributes to the deaths of more Californians than traffic accidents, homicide and AIDS combined, according to a new report released today by Environmental Working Group.

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Wednesday, October 18, 2000

 A new computer investigation by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), using data generated by Texas and other state governments, shows Texas Gov. George Bush has the worst anti-smog record in the country.

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News Release
Wednesday, March 1, 2000

View and Download our full report here: A Few Bad Apples

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, November 18, 1999

Californians are unknowingly spreading fertilizers made from toxic waste to farm fields and home gardens, according to state and independent tests. Even though these products may exceed state standards defining hazardous waste, the State of California is proposing new rules that would legalize the practice of "recycling" toxic waste.

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News Release
Wednesday, November 3, 1999

Group Touts Federal Action Against Dirty, Coal-Burning Plants

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News Release
Wednesday, July 1, 1998

View and Download the report here: English Patient

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Saturday, February 1, 1997

The Clinton Administration's new clean air proposal is an important move forward, but must be strengthened substantially to save the lives of some 40,000 Americans who will continue die prematurely each year even after the new standard is in place, according to a series of reports released today by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a Washington DC based nonprofit research organization.

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News Release
Monday, July 1, 1996

On June 17, the Corps formally proposed to extend some wetlands permits for 5 years, and to add several new permits with the potential for significant environmental damage. One of the new permits would automatically approve many sand and gravel mining operations in wetlands, streams and lakes--operations that can harm water quality and damage fish and wildlife habitat.

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