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Conservation

Farms and ranches cover more than half of all land in the United States. EWG works to keep the land productive and to protect soil, water and wildlife.

Monday, September 21, 2009

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Bill Lambrecht
Published June 14, 2007

There was hope for a cure down in the Louisiana bayous even as the Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone expanded like a B-movie blob.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published September 10, 2007

U.S. farmers should be required to control soil erosion and fertilizer runoff from all land eligible for crop subsidies -- which would be a major expansion of "conservation compliance" rules now in place, an environmental group said on Monday.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Des Moines Register, Philip Brasher

Published September 10, 2008

The new farm bill has barely taken effect and the Democrat-controlled Senate is already moving to shrink spending levels for some land-conservation programs, environmental groups say.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

Mitchell Daily Republic, Seth Tupper

Published September 12, 2008

Hundreds of South Dakotans already are being turned away from a conservation program that could see a pledged funding increase rescinded by Congress and the president.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Hoosier Ag Today, Gary Truitt

Published September 12, 2008

Environmental groups are not happy to see the Senate is already trying to cut spending levels for some of the conservation programs included in the 2008 Farm Bill. The Environmental Quality Incentives Program - or EQIP - would reportedly get just over one-billion dollars in 2009 under a Senate appropriations measure.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, September 17, 2009

 

Bay City Times, Jeff Kart

Published January 22, 2009

With The New Guy in office, billions, as in dollars, seems to be the buzzword. When it comes to the environment, that money could come in handy.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, September 17, 2009

Press coverage last week of the latest federal proposals to clean up the Chesapeake Bay was good. But, an important piece of the puzzle was missing from the discussion.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Despite a quarter of a century of effort by farmers, citizens, environmentalists, and government officials to address pollution in the streams, rivers and waterways of the Chesapeake Bay region, agricultural fertilizers, animal manure and soil erosion remain the watershed’s single largest source of pollution. Without an ambitious effort to fairly but effectively regulate pollution coming from farm fields throughout the watershed, there is simply no chance that the Chesapeake Bay watershed will recover.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, September 7, 2009

A frayed regulatory framework and dependence on voluntary action has done little to mitigate the damage from agricultural activities in the six states in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 21, 2009

 

The New Republic, Bradford Plumer

Excerpt:

The Environmental Working Group recently analyzed the House climate bill and noted that the legislation allows farmers to earn credits under the cap-and-trade regime for practices such as low or no-till farming even if they've been going on since 2001.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 21, 2009

 

Des Moines Register, Phil Brasher

Excerpt:

A bill passed by the House last month would set caps on greenhouse gases and require polluters to have permits for their emissions.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 14, 2009

A new analysis from the Environmental Working Group estimates that the House bill could allow the equivalent of more than 67 large coal-fired power plants to avoid any new controls on greenhouse gas emissions without requiring landowners to create any new carbon sequestration projects.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Sunday, July 12, 2009

 

The Hill, Jim Snyder

Excerpt:

An environmental group is mounting a fresh assault on the climate change legislation that squeaked through the House and faces an uncertain future in the Senate, raising the prospect that the delicate coalition of support around it could fray.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, July 10, 2009

The American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES), narrowly approved in the House, is an important first step toward slowing climate change.

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News Release
Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Remember the Chinese government's draconian crackdown on air pollution before the 2008 Olympics?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, June 5, 2009

To spur action on the 37th World Environment Day (yes, it was Friday, June 5th), Yann Arthus-Bertrand wrote a 'hymn for the planet. This 2-minute trailer will have you running to the theater.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 26, 2009

About bats, mosquitoes and encephalitis, "Carnac the Magnificent" (the Johnny Carson character) might say: "What are three things that are affecting my property value?"

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, May 12, 2009

President Obama’s proposed budget continues the long string of broken promises that have left conservation programs billions short over the past two farm bills. While the White House and the US Department of Agriculture rightly communicate that farmers are a critical component in the fight against global warming, their budget proposes to cut the very programs that can help them win.

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News Release
Thursday, April 30, 2009

The American Lung Association (ALA) just issued its 10th annual State of the Air report for 2009 yesterday. Use it to learn your county's air pollution ratings - they have an interactive air pollution map so you can click your state and drill down from there.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 1, 2009

For the first time, the U.S. Geological Survey has identified the top 150 polluting watersheds in the Mississippi River Basin that cause the annual 8,000 square-mile “Dead Zone” in the Gulf of Mexico. Based on the USGS report released today, members of the Mississippi River Water Quality Collaborative urge the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and state policy makers to use the report to solve water quality problems both within the states and downstream in the Gulf.

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News Release

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