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Conservation

Farms and ranches cover more than half of all land in the United States. EWG works to keep the land productive and to protect soil, water and wildlife.

Thursday, November 5, 2009

The Agriculture Research Service (ARS) of the US Department of Agriculture released a surprising bit of climate change-related research on Tuesday, work that suggests that getting big cuts in greenhouse gas emissions from simple changes in common farming practices may not be as easy as many hope.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, November 2, 2009

Hearings began in the Senate last week on the Kerry-Boxer Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act. This bill, the companion legislation to the Waxman-Markey climate change bill passed by the House, aims  for a 20 percent cut in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 2020.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, October 26, 2009

Crying Wolf, EWG's recent report on current climate change legislation, convincingly debunked exaggerated claims that a cap-and-trade system to limit greenhouse gases will increase costs for the agriculture sector. Many farm state lawmakers and agri-lobby groups have been recklessly misstating and inflating the cost of protecting agriculture from the ravages of climate change, using flawed conclusions drawn from their analysis of the Waxman-Markey climate bill (officially the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 or ACES).

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Mississippi River and Gulf of Mexico watershed informational slides.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, October 15, 2009

When we talk about California and climate change, agriculture matters.  California's agriculture sector faces two major challenges:

  1. Reduce its contribution to climate change.
  2. Arm itself against the threats a warming planet poses to agricultural production.
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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 7, 2009
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Farm industry leaders and their supporters in Congress are trying to derail climate change legislation by insisting that the House-passed bill, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES), will cause ruinous increases in the costs of production for farmers. They claim this threat is so potentially devastating that climate change legislation should be shelved or loaded up with concessions that send more money to their agricultural constituents.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 28, 2009

 

by Kari Hamerschlag

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, September 24, 2009

Remarks by Environmental Working Group Midwest Vice-President Craig Cox to the Mississippi River Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force Public Meeting.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, September 23, 2009

 

 

EWG testifies before the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force that farm run-off in the Mississippi River Basin expands the Gulf of Mexico “dead zone.”

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minneapolis Star Tribune

Published September 18, 2006

The idea that agriculture has become a major source of pollution in the Mississippi River will startle many Midwesterners. But it's no surprise to the government's top environmental regulators.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

New Standard, Jessica Azulay

Published April 11, 2006

Every summer, a huge swell of algae spreads through the Gulf of Mexico and then dies, smothering aquatic life in its wake. Scientists have documented this expanding "dead zone" since the early 1970s, finding that in recent years it has grown to an average of 14,000 square miles of ocean.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Chicago Tribune, Andrew Martin

Published April 9, 2006

A new study on Monday found that a relatively small percentage of rural counties – many of them in Illinois – are contributing most of the fertilizer pollution that is creating a summertime “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico, where massive algae blooms snuff out most aquatic life.

 

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

Farm Futures, Jacqui Fatka

Published April 9, 2006

Nitrate pollution in the Mississippi River Basin is a growing problem, creating a Dead Zone downstream for marine wildlife. A new analysis from the Environmental Working Group shows that the problem is more solvable than it ever has looked before if the federal government begins to focus conservation needs in the trouble area.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Nancy Cole

Published April 10, 2006

Farmers in 15 northeast Arkansas counties are among the top contributors of fertilizer pollution that creates a "dead zone" of more than 5, 000 square miles in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a study released Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

New Orleans Times-Picayune, Matthew Brown

Published April 16, 2006

Louisiana's fishing industry faces an uncertain future after the pounding it took last hurricane season, but fishers know one thing is certain: Sometime this summer, a lifeless expanse of water about the size of Connecticut -- maybe a little bigger, maybe a little smaller -- will form off the state's coast.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Delta Farm Press, David Bennett

Published May 4, 2006

In what could be the first significant shot fired in the 2007 farm bill debate, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released a report on how Mississippi River Basin (MRB) fertilizer run-off is contributing to a massive oxygen-depleted hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published May 4, 2006

More than half of US streams are polluted, with the worst conditions found in the eastern third of the country, according to a study by the Environmental Protection Agency.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minnesota Pilot-Independent, Babe Winkelman

Published June 19, 2006

What grows larger with each passing summer and is roughly the size of New Jersey? The answer: the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, one of the world's most dynamic fisheries.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Peoria Journal Star, Steve Tarter

Published June 25, 2006

It's an area the size of Connecticut that fails to harbor aquatic life in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post

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