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Mining

EWG’s maps revealed a surge in uranium mining claims near the Grand Canyon and helped win protections for 1 million acres near the park and the Colorado River. Read more about our mining work.

Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Reps. Richard Pombo (R-CA) and Jim Gibbons (R-NV) have pulled mining legislation from the House budget bill that could have sold off 350 million acres of American public lands.

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News Release
Monday, December 12, 2005

Proposed fixes to heavily criticized mining legislation sponsored by U.S. Rep. James A. Gibbons (R-NV) would still cost Nevada schools more than $120 million, slash up to $100 million per year in taxes currently paid by the mining industry, and leave 350 million acres of public property across the West open to development. As amended, the Gibbons bill allows the purchase of existing mining claims on lands around Las Vegas that are currently governed by the Southern Nevada Public Land Management Act (SNPLMA).

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, December 12, 2005

Proposed fixes to heavily criticized mining legislation sponsored by U.S. Rep. James A. Gibbons (R-NV) could still cost Nevada schools more than $120 million, slash $100 million per year in taxes currently paid by the mining industry, and leave 350 millions acres of public property across the West open to purchase and development.

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News Release
Thursday, November 10, 2005

The House of Representatives votes today on a federal spending bill with language from Rep. Richard Pombo (R-CA) that will let foreign mining companies, real estate speculators, oil and mining conglomerates, or anyone else purchase up to 350 million acres of American taxpayers' lands for as little as $1,000 per acre.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 8, 2005

A little-known provision in the current House budget reconciliation could precipitate one of the largest land giveaways in American history.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 8, 2005

A little-known provision in the current House budget reconciliation could precipitate one of the largest land giveaways in American history. The provision, spearheaded by Rep. Richard Pombo of California, would put up for sale millions of acres of public land where companies have staked mining claims, including land inside or adjacent to national parks, wilderness areas and other natural treasures. Real estate speculators, oil and gas companies, foreign mining corporations or anyone who is willing to pay $1,000 per acre could buy the land and develop it in any way they wanted.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, September 29, 2005
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) next month will release 250,000-acres for oil and gas development in the heart of New Mexico's Otero Mesa — despite strong local opposition from the governor, the attorney general, a U.S. senator, ranchers, hunters, conservationists and thousands of other New Mexicans. Read More
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News Release
Wednesday, April 13, 2005

For decades, the oil and gas and mining industries have complained that they are locked out of access to public lands that could free the U.S. from dependence on foreign energy sources. Now the first-ever investigation of 1,855 taxpayer-owned natural treasures in the West reveals the truth: Drilling and mining interests already control land in or near more than two-thirds of national parks, forests and wilderness areas.

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News Release
Tuesday, January 18, 2005

In a landmark decision, citizens of Crested Butte, Colo., were told they have no right to challenge the Interior Department’s giveaway of public land in their backyards.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, January 6, 2005

Interior Secretary Gale Norton and other officials in the Bush administration, along with numerous members of Congress, plan to participate in a conference this week at one of the most exclusive luxury resorts in the country.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, December 23, 2004

The international mining giant, Denver-based Newmont Mining Corp., is under fire for dangerously polluting Indonesian communities in violation of US environmental standards. Now, an Environmental Working Group (EWG) search of US government electronic records it has posted on its web site (www.ewg.org/mining/) shows the company holds more acres of mining claims on Western public land than any other metal mining company. Newmont holds 347,458 acres of claims in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada and Washington.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, October 1, 2004

"Gale Norton should be honest when she brags to the public she is 'protecting' something. Gale Norton wasn't, according to records from her own department," said EWG Analyst Dusty Horwitt.

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News Release
Wednesday, February 18, 2004

By Dusty Horwitt and Sean Gray, EWG analysts

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, February 18, 2004

Today 5,000 acres of environmentally sensitive public land in Utah face permanent loss of protection at taxpayer-subsidized auction. A new computer investigation of federal data by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) reveals the size, scope, and locations of this public land giveaway to oil and gas interests.

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News Release

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