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Fracking

EWG’s investigations highlight the inherent risks of the current boom in drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations and empower citizens and lawmakers to work for better regulation.

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

When it comes to drilling in the Marcellus Shale, the natural gas industry leaves no stone unturned.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, August 16, 2011

A Department of Energy advisory panel’s draft report has insufficiently examined in depth the health and safety issues raised by natural gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing, according to a detailed assessment by Environmental Working Group.

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News Release
Monday, August 15, 2011

 

Few Californians realize that the highly controversial shale gas and oil extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” has been taking place in their state for more than 50 years.

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News Release
Monday, August 15, 2011

People across the country are rightly concerned about natural gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing near their homes. Thanks to new technologies, the exploitation of shale gas formations has expanded rapidly and now accounts for nearly 30 percent of U.S. natural gas production.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, August 12, 2011

People across the country are rightly concerned about natural gas drilling and fracturing near their homes. Thanks to new technologies, the exploitation of shale gas formations has expanded rapidly and now accounts for nearly 30 percent of U.S. gas production.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, August 11, 2011

In a draft report on the increasingly controversial practice of shale gas drilling, the Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board Subcommittee sidestepped the crucial question of whether hydraulic fracturing technology should remain exempt from most federal environmental regulation.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Twenty eight scientists from 22 universities in 13 states have signed a letter objecting to the makeup of an industry-dominated advisory panel named by Energy Secretary Steven Chu to examine safety and environmental issues linked to natural gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.”

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News Release
Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Elected officials from across New York state voiced their disapproval of the U.S. Department of Energy’s advisory board on natural gas drilling, demanding that Secretary of Energy Steven Chu correct the glaring imbalance on the panel he appointed.

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News Release
Monday, August 8, 2011

Transcript from public meeting of the Natural Gas Subcommittee of the Secretary of Energy's Advisory Board on June 13, 2011 in Washington D.C.

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Video
Friday, August 5, 2011

Imagine, if you can: Nearly overnight, your water well begins producing slimy, off-color foul smelling and worse tasting water. It's unusable. You can't drink it. You can't bathe in it. You can't wash dishes or rinse produce. Your only option is to get clean water trucked in.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, August 3, 2011

 

Contrary to the drilling industry claim that hydraulic fracturing has never contaminated groundwater, the Environmental Protection Agency concluded in a 1987 study that “fracking” of a natural gas well in West Virginia contaminated an underground drinking water source. That all-but-forgotten report to Congress, uncovered by Environmental Working Group and Earthjustice, found that fracturing gel from a shale gas well more than 4,000 feet deep had contaminated well water.

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News Release
Wednesday, August 3, 2011

An Environmental Working Group investigation by Senior Counsel Dusty Horwitt has uncovered evidence in a long-forgotten federal report and other documents that chemicals from hydraulic fracturing of natural gas wells contaminated drinking water used by two West Virginia families. These graphics illustrate how the "fracking" chemicals might have reached the Parsons and Hagy families' water wells.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Chemical-laden wastewater generated by a natural gas hydraulic fracturing operation killed more than half a stand of trees in a field study at the Monongahela National Forest, according to a new report from the U.S. Forest Service.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Religious leaders, community representatives, environmental groups and health advocates from 100 organizations representing 2 million people in 13 states have united to protest the U.S. Energy Department's decision to set up an advisory panel on hydraulic fracturing dominated by people with financial ties to the natural gas industry.

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News Release
Thursday, June 30, 2011

Hydraulic fracturing has been around for decades. But now, natural gas producers are deploying a new gas drilling method called high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing to release gas locked in untapped shale formations.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, June 27, 2011

Community leaders, environmental organizations, faith-based groups and health advocates are calling on Secretary of Energy Steven Chu to reform the industry-dominated Natural Gas Subcommittee he set up to investigate safety issues raised by hydraulic fracturing.

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News Release
Monday, June 27, 2011

The natural gas industry has lost much support among adults who live in communities where fracking has left the water undrinkable and home values plummeting, but all is not lost.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, June 24, 2011

Underscoring the risks to drinking water supplies of hydraulic fracturing, three water samples collected from private wells following a blowout at a Chesapeake Energy Corp. natural gas drilling site in northeast Pennsylvania have been found to be contaminated, the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said today.

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News Release
Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Following up on last week's contentious hearing in Washington, Pa., the U.S. Energy department has scheduled two all-day sessions for Tuesday, June 28, and Wednesday, July 13, to listen to people concerned about controversial hydraulic fracturing operations in the Appalachian shale gas fields.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, June 20, 2011

 

Following up on last week’s contentious hearing in Washington, Pa., the U.S. Energy department has scheduled two all-day sessions for Tuesday, June 28, and Wednesday, July 13, to listen to people concerned about controversial hydraulic fracturing operations in shale gas fields.

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News Release

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