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Consumer Products

 

EWG offers you popular, easy-to-use guides to help you choose products and foods that are free of toxic ingredients, safe for your children and environmentally friendly. 

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Researchers found a fire-retardant chemical that could disrupt the hormone system in the urine of babies who were apparently exposed with baby products such as bassinets, car seats and nursery gliders, an alarming new study by Duke University reports. The chemical also can cause cancer.
 

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News Release
Tuesday, November 3, 2015

EWG’s Skin Deep®, launched in 2004, transformed the way you shop for personal care and cosmetics items. Two years ago, we introduced the Skin Deep® barcode scanning app to make shopping on-the-go even easier.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 27, 2015

The EWG VERIFIED: For Your Health™ mark will help shoppers quickly and easily identify personal care products, including cosmetics, that meet EWG’s strictest standards while shopping in stores and online.

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News Release
Friday, October 23, 2015

From spooky to adorable, face paint can put the finishing touches on a great Halloween costume.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, October 22, 2015

New evidence shows that a sunscreen ingredient EWG has long urged people to avoid is damaging to coral reefs. A study published [Oct. 20] in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology found that even a tiny amount of oxybenzone, a common ingredient meant to block harmful ultraviolet radiation, can harm or kill corals by damaging the DNA in both mature and larval coral organisms.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 21, 2015

As my 10-year old daughter handed me her sleeping bag and pillow after the spa party, I noticed that her nails were decorated with multi-colored stickers. She said that she knew I worked in environmental health and wouldn’t want her to get her nails painted.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, October 19, 2015

Researchers at Duke University and Environmental Working Group have found evidence of a suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical widely used in popular nail polishes in the bodies of more than two-dozen women who participated in a biomonitoring study. The study, published today in Environmental International, found that all women had a metabolite of triphenyl phosphate, or TPHP, in their bodies just 10 to 14 hours after painting their nails.

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News Release
Monday, October 19, 2015

If you wear nail polish, you might be applying more than glossy color to your fingertips. A new study by researchers at EWG and Duke University finds that nail polishes can contain a suspected endocrine disruptor called triphenyl phopshte, or TPHP.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 15, 2015

It’s not surprising that many nail polishes contain potentially toxic chemicals. Now a study conducted by researchers at Duke University and EWG finds that at least one of those chemicals could be ending up in your body.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, September 2, 2015

They’re cheap, appealing and easy to find. They even smell nice. It’s no wonder that disinfecting and antibacterial cleaning wipes are so popular. Last year Clorox executives reported that about half of U.S. homes use their brand of wipes. Some schools provide them for teachers or request them among back-to-school supplies. The truth is, disinfecting wipes are not necessary for routine cleaning.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, August 21, 2015

Hair straightening sessions are injuring clients and making stylists sick, so why are they still offered in salons across the country?

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, August 13, 2015

When choosing the right school for their children, many parents ask about topics like class size, community, learning objectives and schedule.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, August 7, 2015

We know there is a link between exposure to cleaning products and respiratory problems. But could unborn babies be at risk from their mothers’ exposures even before they’ve taken their first breaths?

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Scientists are only beginning to investigate how certain chemicals may interact to contribute to cancer development. But given that we live in a sea of chemicals, it makes sense to begin reducing exposures to ones we know are bad actors.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 30, 2015

We live in the age of plastic. Every year we make plastic stuff in amounts that equal the weight of the entire human population, and enough of it is thrown away to circle the Earth four times. More than five trillion plastic pieces, altogether weighing more than 250,000 tons, are floating at sea. We have polluted our oceans with plastic to the point where we have created five enormous accumulation zones, sometimes referred to as garbage patches.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, July 17, 2015

A new study has found that vaginal douching by American women of childbearing age may increase their exposure to hormone-disrupting phthalates and contribute to racial and ethnic differences in exposure to the chemicals.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, July 13, 2015

Our shocking new report uncovered four brands of crayons and two brands of kids’ crime scene kits that tested positive for deadly asbestos. What’s worse, these contaminated toys are being sold across the country with no warning!

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 9, 2015

Where are your child’s crayons? In a drawer, a shoebox, a backpack or an arts and crafts kit? Wherever they are, they’re probably among your child’s favorite playthings.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, July 8, 2015

By now most of us know to wear sunscreen at the beach or during other outdoor activities. But some people mistakenly think wearing sunscreen makes them immune from sunburn, which can lead to skin cancer.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, July 7, 2015

In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration ruled that sunscreen companies were no longer allowed to assert that their products were “waterproof” or “sweatproof” because these claims exaggerated the effectiveness of the sunscreens, misleading consumers.
 

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EnviroBlog
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