Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

The Issue

Consumer Products

 

EWG offers you popular, easy-to-use guides to help you choose products and foods that are free of toxic ingredients, safe for your children and environmentally friendly. 

Highlights

Cleaning Products Marketed as Safe for Babies Contain Known Human Carcinogen Read More
EWG's Guide to Healthy Cleaning: How did we do it? Read More

Sign Up

Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts & environmental tips from EWG. [Privacy]

  

 

The Latest on Consumer Products

Wednesday, January 22, 2003

For decades, they made the world safe for skyrocketing sales of arsenic-soaked wood, and dangerous for the millions of Americans who were exposed to the material, and are still exposed today. But faced with overwhelming scientific evidence that resulted in a regulatory ban and prompted a flood of lawsuits, the American Wood Preservers Institute of Gainesville, FL, has closed its doors for good.

Read More
News Release
Tuesday, November 19, 2002

Most people are surprised to learn that the government neither conducts nor requires safety testing of chemicals that go into health and beauty products. Today a panel funded and advised by the cosmetic industry determined that cosmetic companies can continue to add reproductive toxins known as phthalates to cosmetics marketed to women of childbearing age.

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, July 8, 2002

In May 2002 a coalition of environmental and public health organizations contracted with a major national laboratory to test 72 name-brand, off-the-shelf beauty products for the presence of phthalates, a large family of industrial chemicals linked to per- manent birth defects in the male reproductive system.

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, February 12, 2002

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) today applauded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for standing up to the chemical and wood treatment industries by forcing the phase-out of arsenic-treated lumber.

Read More
News Release
Thursday, November 8, 2001

Nationwide sampling in 13 metropolitan areas found harmful levels of cancer-causing arsenic on the surface of "pressure-treated" wood purchased at Home Depot and Lowe's Home Improvement Warehouse stores, according to a report released today.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, May 23, 2001

The Center for Environmental Health (CEH) announced today that it has filed legal notice to sue the manufacturers of wooden playground equipment treated with arsenic.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, May 23, 2001

The Healthy Building Network (HBN) and the Environmental Working Group (EWG) today petitioned the Consumer Product Safety Commission to ban arsenic-treated wood in playground equipment and to review its safety for use in other consumer items.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, May 23, 2001

View and Download the report here: Poisoned Playgrounds

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, May 23, 2001

The East Coast's leading manufacturer of wooden playground equipment, PlayNation Play Systems, Inc., announced today that it will discontinue the use of arsenic-treated lumber, becoming the first national playground manufacturer to exclusively use arsenic-free preserved wood in the construction of treated wood playgrounds.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, November 1, 2000

In September 2000, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that every single one of the 289 persons tested for the plasticizer dibutyl phthalate (DBP) had the compound in their bodies. The finding passed with little public fanfare, but surprised government scientists, who just one month earlier had rated DBP of little health concern based on the scientific assumption, which later turned out to be wrong, that levels in humans were within safe limits. DBP causes a number of birth defects in lab animals, primarily to male offspring, including testicular atrophy, reduced sperm count, and defects in the structure of the penis (CERHR 2000).

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, October 29, 1999

OCTOBER 28, 1999

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 31, 1990
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 31, 1990

Seal or remove arsenic-treated wood decks & play structures. Those built before 2003 likely contain arsenic. Don't allow children to eat at older picnic tables (or cover them with a cloth). Have kids wash hands after playing near these surfaces, or avoid them altogether.

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides

Pages

Subscribe to The Latest on Consumer Products