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Cleaning Products Marketed as Safe for Babies Contain Known Human Carcinogen Read More
EWG's Guide to Healthy Cleaning: How did we do it? Read More

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The Latest on Consumer Products

Friday, April 27, 2007

Question: I've heard nasty rumors regarding the treatment of carpet before it's sold and put into a house. I've heard that it's treated with some really bad chemicals, then rolled up and stored until sold. I'd really like to know what the carpet is treated with and what's the best thing to do.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, April 24, 2007

A high school algebra project first clued me in to the inefficiencies of incandescent light bulbs. After working out some basic calculations in the classroom, I was appalled to find just how much electricity these virtual heat-lamps devour (and how much more they add to electric bills) in relation to their fluorescent counterparts.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, April 12, 2007

Popular Mechanics tested seven different CFLs for brightness, color, and other characteristics and all seven stomped out the incandescent 'control' bulb. They only used one incandescent as a control which seems a bit unfair to the little energy drainers.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 11, 2007

It's a question that may soon be irrelevant in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Reprinted from CSPI's Integrity in Science Watch: Proctor & Gamble has launched a massive advertising blitz to counter consumer fears about the rising death toll from poisoned pet food. The firm took out 59 full-page ads in daily newspapers, with most citing reassurances from an independent task force.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, March 12, 2007

By now you've likely seen some of the national attention EWG’s recent report about Bisphenol A (BPA), an ingredient used in plastic bottles and in the lining of food cans, has generated. BPA has been shown to be toxic in low doses, and has been linked to breast and prostate cancer, diabetes and infertility. Pregnant women and infants are most at-risk, and yet there are currently no safety standards established.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, March 5, 2007

EWG laboratory tests found a toxic food-can lining ingredient associated with birth defects of the male and female reproductive systems in over half of 97 cans of name-brand fruit, vegetables, soda, and other commonly eaten canned goods. The study targeted the chemical bisphenol A (BPA), a plastic and resin ingredient used to line metal food and drink cans. There are no government safety standards limiting the amount of BPA in canned food.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, March 5, 2007

In the most comprehensive U.S. tests for an industrial chemical used to line cans of foods, an independent laboratory found a compound linked to birth defects in more than half of the samples of canned fruit, vegetables, soda, and baby formula from supermarket shelves, according to an Environmental Working Group (EWG) report released today.

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News Release
Thursday, February 22, 2007

NPR reports on the hidden hazards of compact fluorescent light bulbs. CFLs contain trace amounts of mercury that can be released when the bulbs break. The concern is not for consumers but rather those who handle our solid waste. As recycling programs for CFLs are not yet in place in many cities, some people are tempted to toss them into their municipal trash, where invariably they will break and leave residues on trash cans, dumpsters, and trash trucks. Bad idea.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, February 13, 2007

So you’re picking out flowers to mail your loved ones for Valentines Day, but guess what else you’ll be sending them—according to the Associated Press, the flowers you send will be “sprayed, rinsed, and dipped in a battery of lethal chemicals.”

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, February 12, 2007

A major loophole in federal law allows fragrance manufacturers to hide potentially hazardous chemicals in product scents, including substances linked to allergies, birth defects, and even cancer. Because they won't tell you what's in the scents they sell you, we combed through thousands of Valentine's Day gift ideas to bring you products that not only smell great, but that are also free of hidden, potentially hazardous fragrances.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, January 24, 2007

A new report by ConsumerLab.com finds only 10 of 21 products tested meet the claims on their labels. Several of the multivitamin products tested contained high levels of lead, including one women's multivitamin that contained 15.3 micrograms of lead per daily dose--more than 10 times the amount of lead allowed without a warning label in the state of California.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, January 19, 2007

Are Wal-Mart's 'organics' organic?- A year after Wal-Mart laid out ambitious plans to become a much bigger player in the organic foods business, the giant retailer is running into trouble over its organic effort with consumer activists and government regulators.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Dell has a new program to plant a tree for each computer it sells, saying it could offset CO2 emissions from the machines. I’m not sure who did the math on that, but the program is commendable nonetheless. More impressive is Dell’s free recycling of all computers, monitors, printers, and other gadgets without requiring the purchase of a newer model.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, January 4, 2007

The New York Times' most emailed article of the day reports on the absurd marketing claims for cosmetic skin creams and the high prices the products demand. A Manhattan dermatologist recommends reducing your daily skin care routine to two simple ingredients: gentle soap and sunscreen, and a third product only for specific skin needs like acne or pigment spots. Avoid the high-priced brands, because no research suggests more expensive products are any better.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, January 4, 2007

On January 19, EPA will decide whether or not to allow unrestricted use of the potent human carcinogen chromium-6 in a wood preservative known as ACC (acid copper chromate), for lumber sold at the nation's hardware and home improvement stores.

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News Release
Tuesday, November 7, 2006

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology finds that exposure to carpeting and other materials in the workplace significantly increases adults' risk of developing asthma. Carpet contains over 100 known toxins including benzene, formaldehyde, and flame-retardants. Added features like stain resistance increase the number of toxins.
[ via : Reuters ]

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, October 12, 2006

Last week California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) signed a bill to establish a state-wide biomonitoring program aimed at helping to identify populations at-risk from long-term chemical exposures as well as isolate the trends that put certain groups in harm’s way. According to Environmental Science & Technology, public health officials are gaining confidence in the importance of biomonitoring as the method has helped uncover hidden threats as it did with an arsenic-laden skin cream in New York City.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Dupont has announced its new sustainability initiative which includes, among other goals, a reduction of air carcinogen emissions and submission to independent third-party verification of environmental management practices at all global manufacturing facilities. Our friend Jeff McIntire-Strasburg of Sustainablog has more to offer on Dupont's announcement.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 10, 2006

EWG submits comments to FDA on the need for a public process to identify and evaluate the safety of nanomaterials in cosmetics. Recommendations to FDA include the need to identify nano-scale materials in personal care products and complete product safety evaluations in those cases.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence

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