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Food Containers

 

What you can’t see can hurt you. Chemicals commonly leach out of food packaging and containers into your food. EWG’s tools and research can help you avoid avoidable toxic exposures.

Saturday, October 11, 2008

Breast milk is best, but whether you're feeding breastmilk or formula in a bottle, use EWG's guide to feed your baby safely.  

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, August 13, 2008

EWG scientists interviewed about BPA in baby formula & safe cosmetics.

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Video
Friday, July 25, 2008

It might be in your toothbrush. Your socks. Your child's rattle. Then again - it might not be. But do you know for sure?

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Triclosan is an antibacterial chemical found in many products. Use EWG's Triclosan to identify and avoid this toxic chemical in dish soap, personal care and other antibacterial products.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 17, 2008

Although most shoppers probably don't know it, "antibacterial" isn't just for soap anymore. From sports clothing to cutting boards, deodorants, and children's toys, a wide range of consumer products are now commonly treated with antimicrobial pesticides such as triclosan.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, June 9, 2008

 

In 2006, under pressure from the U.S. EPA, DuPont and 7 other companies promised to phase out by 2015 a cancer-causing chemical called PFOA, used to make Teflon and also found in grease-resistant coatings for food packaging. In its place, the chemical industry is pushing new, supposedly “green” food package coatings. But an investigation by EWG finds no evidence that the industry-touted replacement chemicals being rushed to market are safer -- and plenty of evidence that DuPont and other manufacturers are continuing a decades-long pattern of deception about the health risks of PFOA and related chemicals.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Liquid infant formula from the top manufacturers is sold in cans lined with a toxic chemical linked to reproductive disorders and neurobehavioral problems in laboratory animals, according to an investigation by Environmental Working Group (EWG). The chemical is almost as common in the packaging of powdered formula, with 4 of the top 5 companies acknowledging its use.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Many new parents are aware that the toxic chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) leaches from plastic baby bottles found on the shelves of stores across America. But a new investigation by EWG reveals that BPA is also used to line nearly all infant formula cans. BPA levels found in liquid formula are likely to be far higher than those that leach from bottles under normal use.

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News Release
Thursday, May 31, 2007

Answer: Stainless steel water bottles are the way to go, especially for hot liquids. Make sure your stainless steel bottle doesn't have a plastic liner inside, which may leach bisphenol-A (BPA), an industrial chemical linked to birth defects of the male and female reproductive systems and other health concerns.

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Key Issues:
EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, March 5, 2007

EWG laboratory tests found a toxic food-can lining ingredient associated with birth defects of the male and female reproductive systems in over half of 97 cans of name-brand fruit, vegetables, soda, and other commonly eaten canned goods. The study targeted the chemical bisphenol A (BPA), a plastic and resin ingredient used to line metal food and drink cans. There are no government safety standards limiting the amount of BPA in canned food.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 18, 2006

Today As You Sow and the Container Recycling Institute released a report card on the performance of major U.S. beverage companies on recycling and recycled content in their containers. They found that except for Coke and Pepsi, the industry gets poor or failing grades.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Over 100 accidental ingestions of Colgate-Palmolive’s multi-use cleaner Fabuloso have prompted an article in the journal Pediatrics. Those who drank the cleaning product (40% of whom are over 12), presumably did so because it’s sold in a color and packaging that resembles a sports drink. In honor of their 100th accidental poisoning, Colgate-Palmolive has decided to redo the Fabuloso label to more clearly indicate the product’s intended use.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, January 25, 2006

EWG commends the professional staff and leadership at EPA for forging a stewardship agreement with major companies that will, if properly implemented, dramatically reduce, and eventually eliminate, pollution associated with the chemical known as PFOA, and related chemicals that break down to become PFOA and similar substances. These toxic chemicals pose numerous health risks, are extraordinarily persistent in the environment, and have already found their way into the blood of people worldwide, including most Americans.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it will fine Teflon maker DuPont $16.5 million for two decades' worth of covering up company studies that showed it was polluting drinking water and newborn babies with an indestructible chemical that causes cancer, birth defects and other serious health problems in animals. The chemical is in the blood of over 95 percent of Americans.

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News Release
Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Breakdown chemicals from DuPont coatings and related sources are now in the blood of 95 percent of Americans, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has spent the last several years trying to determine how they get there.

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Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, August 10, 2005

In the past week, activists have pressed Teflon maker DuPont to clean up its act on two fronts. Environmental groups demanded that the company monitor groundwater around its local plant, the only one in the US that makes this indestructible, cancer-causing chemical, and the steeworkers' union urged carpet and clothing retailers and fast food companies to warn consumers that their products may be coated with chemicals that break down into DuPont's toxic Teflon chemical.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, January 11, 2005

Despite Teflon maker DuPont's longstanding claim that there are 'no known health effects' associated with its Teflon chemical PFOA, the company today announced that in a recently-completed worker study it found that PFOA exposures among Teflon plant workers were correlated with a 10 per cent increase in cholesterol.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, May 7, 2004

A new study presented at a meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicologists and Chemists links the Teflon chemical C8 [also known as PFOA] to elevated cancer rates. Researchers found higher levels of prostate cancer in men and cervical and uterine cancer in women exposed to C8 than in the general population.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 10, 2003

EWG asks the CEOs of nine major fast food corporations to disclose the use of toxic nonstick chemicals in their packaging.

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News Release
Thursday, May 15, 2003

Telfon-coated cookware poses a hazard when it is heated to high temperatures. EWG tests show that in 2 to 5 minutes on a conventional stovetop, cookware coated with Teflon and other non-stick surfaces can exceed temperatures at which the coating breaks apart and emits toxic particles and gases linked to hundreds, perhaps thousands, of pet bird deaths and an unknown number of human illnesses each year.

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Reports & Consumer Guides

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