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Cosmetics

Neither industry nor government screens cosmetics and personal care products for safety before they’re for sale. EWG's Skin Deep tells you what to watch out for in more than 74,000 products.

Friday, July 23, 2010

The new Story of Cosmetics video explains why personal care products in the United States contain untested and downright dangerous ingredients.

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Thursday, July 22, 2010

The 2009 President's Cancer Panel report, "Reducing Environmental Cancer Risk, What We Can Do Now," confirms what Rachel Carson articulated in Silent Spring and what Sandra Steingraber argued in her book, Living Downstream.

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Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Annie Leonard does it again. This time she tells us about all those products in the cosmetics aisle that we use so many of every day (12 for women, 6 for men, on average).

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Wednesday, July 21, 2010

WASHINGTON, July 21 –For the first time in 70 years, Congress is poised to close the gaping holes in the outdated federal law that allows chemicals linked to cancer, birth defects, learning disabilities and other illnesses in the products we use on our bodies every day.

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News Release
Wednesday, July 7, 2010

Have you ever counted how many cosmetics or personal care products you use in a day? Chances are it's nearly 10.

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Friday, May 28, 2010

 

EWG asks the FDA’s National Center for Toxicological Research to complete its study of vitamin A ingredients, which according to agency tests speed the development of skin tumors and lesions on sun-exposed skin. EWG urges FDA to make a determination about the safety of these ingredients in cosmetics and sunscreens.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, May 12, 2010

San Francisco - A new analysis reveals that top-selling fragrance products—from Britney Spears’ Curious and Hannah Montana Secret Celebrity to Calvin Klein Eternity and Abercrombie & Fitch Fierce —contain a dozen or more secret chemicals not listed on labels, multiple chemicals that can trigger allergic reactions or disrupt hormones, and many substances that have not been assessed for safety by the beauty industry’s self-policing review panels.

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News Release
Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Laboratory tests commissioned by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and analyzed by EWG revealed 38 secret chemicals in 17 name brand fragrance products, topped by American Eagle Seventy Seven with 24, Chanel Coco with 18, and Britney Spears Curious and Giorgio Armani Acqua Di Gio with 17.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, April 2, 2010

Thankfully, one can interpret spring cleaning in many ways. Some weed overgrown gardens, others dust every square inch of the house. I like to clear out my pantry and cook a mix matched feast with what I find. It's productive but doesn't involve intensive cleaning -- win, win. 

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Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Enviroblog readers all know that "fragrance" is a term that the cosmetics, cleaning and candle industries use on ingredient lists that discloses only that there are unnamed chemicals in the product.

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Wednesday, January 27, 2010

I was about seven years old, and frustrated from trying to curl my straight, limp hair when my mom taught me a saying she had learned from her mom when she was a young girl: "What price beauty."

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Thursday, January 7, 2010

We think consumers deserve to know that the products and ingredients they use every day have been tested for safety.

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Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Hitting the slopes this winter? Gnarly is for steeps and chutes, not faces.

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Monday, December 7, 2009

Last week we told you about the 232 toxic chemicals we found in umbilical cord blood. This week we tell you how to reduce your exposures to toxic chemicals to keep them out of your womb.

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Monday, November 23, 2009

If you love EWG's Skin Deep database, then this series is for you. If you've never even heard of our Skin Deep database, this series is also for you. And for pretty much anyone else on the planet who uses toothpaste, shampoo, diaper cream, lipstick, cologne, shaving cream, nail polish and basically any other "personal care product" you can think of.

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Monday, November 2, 2009

140,321,493 searches have been requested on EWG's Skin Deep cosmetics safety database since 2004 - and counting.

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Monday, October 26, 2009

 

EWG’s Olga Naidenko testifies before the New York City Counsel Committee on Environmental Protection in support of a proposed law to require testing for pharmaceuticals and personal care product chemicals in New York City drinking water.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, October 9, 2009

Last month, you saw the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics' first video about cosmetics safety, What's going on with toxic chemicals in cosmetics?

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Wednesday, September 16, 2009

It's a question most people are surprised by, in a "Huh, that's something I need to think about?" way. Check out this new video from the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, a coalition of nonprofits, co-founded by EWG, that works to get toxic chemicals out of personal care products. As it makes all too clear, your average park-goer thinks that some government agency regulates personal care products to make sure they're safe.

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Wednesday, July 22, 2009

I'm a veteran of many a house party for change - and a big fan of the concept. In fact, I got started in online activism at a friend's Moms Rising house party, where we watched a short film and discussed how we could create change - in our own lives and in the public policies that govern them.

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